Library News and Much More!

February 13, 2017
by Carina Chernisky
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New Books

Please check the location of the following items, as some are on our new book cart located on the third floor, in a display case, or have already been placed in the stacks.

General Collection
Back from the Dead: Wrongful Convictions and Criminal Justice in China by He Jiahong (Voyager)
A Chinese Traveler in Medieval Korea: Xu Jing’s Illustrated Account of the Xuanhe Embassy to Koryo translated by Sem Vermeersch (Voyager)
Divided Lenses: Screen Memories of War in East Asia by Michael Berry and Ching Sawada (Voyager)
Figures of Buddhist Modernity in Asia by Jeffrey Samuels, Justin Thomas McDaniel, and Mark Michael Rowe (Voyager)
A Good Revolutionary is NOT a Dead Revolutionary: Memoirs of Ezzat Shahi, an Activist and Participant in the Iranian Revolution-1978-1979 translated by Amir Ali Shirazi (Voyager)
Igniting the Internet: Youth and Activism in Postauthoritarian South Korea by Jiyeon Kang (Voyager)
Japanese Feminist Debates: a Century of Contention on Sex, Love, and Labor by Ayako Kano (Voyager)
Numinous Awareness is Never Dark: The Korean Buddhist Master Chinul’s Excerpts on Zen Practice translated by Robert E. Buswell Jr. (Voyager)
One Hundred Million Philosophers: Science of Thought and the Culture of Democracy in Postwar Japan by Adam Bronson (Voyager)
Places for Happiness: Community, Self, and Performance in the Philippines by William Peterson (Voyager)
The Silk Roads: a New History of the World by Peter Frankopan (Voyager)

Hawaiian Pacific Collection
E Nga Uri Whakatupu: Weaving Legacies by Dame Rangimarie Hetet and Diggeress Te Kanawa (Voyager)
Protea: a Guide to Cultivated Species and Varieties by Lewis J. Matthews (Voyager)

February 7, 2017
by Wayde Oshiro
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Reusing, Revising, and Remixing OER

You’ve heard about the potential of OER to reduce educational costs for students, but what does it mean for you as an instructor besides a potentially longer to do list?

One of the greatest benefits that OER has to offer is the freedom to reuse, remix, revise, redistribute, and retain resources licensed as ‘open’ without worrying about copyright. How many times have you wondered whether you were violating copyright law?

Reusing OER involves taking available open materials and adopting them ‘as is.’  It’s similar process to selecting a publisher’s textbook. Moving up the ladder, revising and remixing requires a higher level of involvement and commitment because you are a modifying a resource (or resources) to better meet your teaching needs.  Yes, there is work involved and it can be substantial but the end result promises better materials for your exact(ing) needs. Billy Meinke, UHM OER Technologist, has a fantastic post describing the revising and remixing process in a little more detail.  (Say it like you mean it: Describing revision and remixing of OER)

Leeward’s seven-week Go Open, Go Free Using OER workshop series started today with a cohort of 9 faculty and lecturers ready to discover how they can incorporate open educational resources into their courses.  You’ll be hearing more about their experiences in this workshop, what they’re learning and what they hope to do with OER in the future.

I Mua Nō Ka ʻUlu: Celebrate ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi Month!

January 31, 2017 by Annemarie Paikai | 0 comments

The month of Pepeluali (February) is celebrated as ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi month.  Here at Leeward library, some of our newest resources include 31 children’s books written entirely in ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi! This series is called I Mua Nō Ka ʻUlu and and all of the titles were written by the late Sam Noʻeau Warner.  Although these books were written for children, language learners at all levels will find immense value in both the content and the grammar within these materials.  You can access these and many other resources that perpetuate the Hawaiian language in our Hawaiʻi-Pacific Collection.

 

All of these exciting titles can be found upstairs in the Hawaiʻi-Pacific Collection at call numbers PL6445 .W36517 2009 – PL6445 .W36589 2009

This gallery contains 7 photos

January 25, 2017
by Natalie Wahl
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Identifying Campus Plants: A Horticulture, Kilo ‘Aina, & Library Collaboration

You may notice some interesting new signage around campus! Horticulture lab classes came to Leeward Library last week to identify plants, find information on their plant (and cite sources!), and create informational signage on their plant. This place based learning lab was created to connect culture and science and to inspire and inform a population of students, staff, faculty, and community members that pass these plants every day.

Keep an eye out for these student-made signs, and if you are interested in learning how to identify plants, please visit this LibGuide that is full of library resources (both print and electronic). Also, if you are interested in hosting a similar project in the library, please contact Natalie at nwahl@hawaii.edu!

January 24, 2017
by Wayde Oshiro
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Save $$ with New e-Resources at Your Library

We’re kicking off our Spring Library Learning Series with a reprise of our convocation breakout session from early January.  If you missed it the first time now’s your chance to catch it again!

  • Tuesday, January 31
  • 1:00-2:00 PM
  • Library, Kapunawai

With Carina Chernisky, Public Services Specialist and Librarians Junie Hayashi, Annemarie Paikai, and Natalie Wahl.

Leeward CC Library staff will show you how new e-resources can support your students and enhance your academic, professional, and personal life.  Featured resources include:

Our next Library Learning Series workshop will be in late February.

January 23, 2017
by Carina Chernisky
0 comments

New Books

Please check the location of the following items, as some are on our new book cart located on the third floor, in a display case, or have already been placed in the stacks. Titles from our General Collection can be “held” via Voyager (click on the link below and follow these directions).

General Collection
$2 A Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America by Kathryn J. Edin and H. Luke Shaefer (Voyager)
Altered Genes, Twisted Truth: How the Venture to Genetically Engineer Our Food Has Subverted Science, Corrupted Government, and Systematically Deceived the Public by Steven M. Druker (Voyager)
Black Flags: the Rise of Isis by Joby Warrick (Voyager)
The Book of Joy: Lasting Happiness in a Changing World by His Holiness the Dalai Lama, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, and Douglas Abrams (Voyager)
The Cartoon Guide to Algebra by Larry Gonick (Voyager)
Cognitive Therapy of Personality Disorders by Aaron T. Beck, Denise D. Davis, and Arthur Freeman (Voyager)
The Complete Guide to Auto Body Repair by Dennis W. Parks (Voyager)
Deep Dark Fears by Fran Krause (Voyager)
The Divine by Asaf Hanuka, Tomer Hanuka, and Boaz Lavie (Voyager)
Electric and Hybrid Vehicles by Tom Denton (Voyager)
ESL Classroom Activities for Teens & Adults: Fluency Activities and Grammar Drills by Shelley Ann Vernon (Voyager)
Food Forensics: the Hidden Toxins Lurking in Your Food and How You Can Avoid Them in Lifelong Health by Mike Adams (Voyager)
Humans: from the Beginning by Christopher Seddon (Voyager)
Killing and Dying: Stories by Adrian Tomine (Voyager)
March: Book Two by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, and Nate Powell (Voyager)
March: Book Three by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, and Nate Powell (Voyager)
Mind Over Mood: Change How You Feel by Changing the Way You Think by Dennis Greenberger, PhD and Christine A. Padesky, PhD (Voyager)
Mockingbird: I Can Explain by Chelsea Cain, Kate Niemczyk, and Ibrahim Moustafa (Voyager)
Monstress by Marjorie Liu and Sana Takeda (Voyager)
The Nameless City by Faith Erin Hicks and Jor Die Bellaire (Voyager)
The Osamu Tezuka Story: a Life in Manga and Anime by Toshio Ban and Tezuka Productions (Voyager)
The Past in Perspective: an Introduction to Human Prehistory by Kenneth L. Feder (Voyager)
The Productivity Project: Accomplishing More by Managing Your Time, Attention, and Energy by Chris Bailey (Voyager)
The Sandman: Overture by Neil Gaiman, J.H. Williams III, and Dave Stewart (Voyager)
The Sheriff of Babylon: Bang, Bang, Bang by Tom King and Mitch Gerads (Voyager)
The Vision: Little Worse Than a Man by Tom King and Gabriel Hernandez Walta (Voyager)

Hawaiian/Pacific Collection
Artefacts of Encounter: Cook’s Voyages, Colonial Collecting and Museum Histories by Nicholas Thomas, Julie Adams, Billie Lythberg, Maia Nuku, and Amiria Salmond (Voyager)
For a Song by Rodney Morales (Voyager)
Ho’ala Loko I’a: Permit Application Guidebook by the DLNR Office of Conservation and Coastal Lands (Voyager)
The Lives of Hawai’i’s Dolphins and Whales: Natural History and Conservation by Robin W. Baird (Voyager)
Long Hops: Making Sense of Bird Migration by Mark Denny (Voyager)
Making the Modern Primitive: Cultural Tourism in the Trobriand Islands by Michelle MacCarthy (Voyager)
The Maori Meeting House: Introducing the Whare Whakairo by Damian Skinner (Voyager)
Plants for Our Healing by May Kealoha (Voyager)

Juvenile Collection
A Poem for Peter: the Story of Ezra Jack Keats by Andrea Davis Pickney (Voyager)
Ada Twist, Scientist by Andrea Beaty (Voyager)
Iggy Peck, Architect by Andrea Beaty (Voyager)
The Most Magnificent Thing by Ashely Spires (Voyager)
What Do You Do With An Idea? by Kobi Yamada (Voyager)

 

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