Library News and Much More!

February 27, 2017
by Wayde Oshiro
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Database Trial: World Religions

Trial ended. World Religions is now available for all Leeward users.  Click here.

The Infobase World Religions database provides historical and contemporary coverage of major world religions and spiritual movements. World Religions is not a comprehensive religion resource. It offers access to concise articles on each religion, select primary source materials, sacred texts, music clips, and videos. Supplemental resources include images of religious art, architecture, and rituals; historical timelines; maps and graphs; and a calendar of religious holidays and observances.

Students can use World Religions as a gateway to exploring religion-related topics in a structured and unbiased manner, or as a resource for maps and images that can be used to provide a finishing touch on their research assignments.

 

February 13, 2017
by Carina Chernisky
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New Books

Please check the location of the following items, as some are on our new book cart located on the third floor, in a display case, or have already been placed in the stacks.

General Collection
Back from the Dead: Wrongful Convictions and Criminal Justice in China by He Jiahong (Voyager)
A Chinese Traveler in Medieval Korea: Xu Jing’s Illustrated Account of the Xuanhe Embassy to Koryo translated by Sem Vermeersch (Voyager)
Divided Lenses: Screen Memories of War in East Asia by Michael Berry and Ching Sawada (Voyager)
Figures of Buddhist Modernity in Asia by Jeffrey Samuels, Justin Thomas McDaniel, and Mark Michael Rowe (Voyager)
A Good Revolutionary is NOT a Dead Revolutionary: Memoirs of Ezzat Shahi, an Activist and Participant in the Iranian Revolution-1978-1979 translated by Amir Ali Shirazi (Voyager)
Igniting the Internet: Youth and Activism in Postauthoritarian South Korea by Jiyeon Kang (Voyager)
Japanese Feminist Debates: a Century of Contention on Sex, Love, and Labor by Ayako Kano (Voyager)
Numinous Awareness is Never Dark: The Korean Buddhist Master Chinul’s Excerpts on Zen Practice translated by Robert E. Buswell Jr. (Voyager)
One Hundred Million Philosophers: Science of Thought and the Culture of Democracy in Postwar Japan by Adam Bronson (Voyager)
Places for Happiness: Community, Self, and Performance in the Philippines by William Peterson (Voyager)
The Silk Roads: a New History of the World by Peter Frankopan (Voyager)

Hawaiian Pacific Collection
E Nga Uri Whakatupu: Weaving Legacies by Dame Rangimarie Hetet and Diggeress Te Kanawa (Voyager)
Protea: a Guide to Cultivated Species and Varieties by Lewis J. Matthews (Voyager)

February 7, 2017
by Wayde Oshiro
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Reusing, Revising, and Remixing OER

You’ve heard about the potential of OER to reduce educational costs for students, but what does it mean for you as an instructor besides a potentially longer to do list?

One of the greatest benefits that OER has to offer is the freedom to reuse, remix, revise, redistribute, and retain resources licensed as ‘open’ without worrying about copyright. How many times have you wondered whether you were violating copyright law?

Reusing OER involves taking available open materials and adopting them ‘as is.’  It’s similar process to selecting a publisher’s textbook. Moving up the ladder, revising and remixing requires a higher level of involvement and commitment because you are a modifying a resource (or resources) to better meet your teaching needs.  Yes, there is work involved and it can be substantial but the end result promises better materials for your exact(ing) needs. Billy Meinke, UHM OER Technologist, has a fantastic post describing the revising and remixing process in a little more detail.  (Say it like you mean it: Describing revision and remixing of OER)

Leeward’s seven-week Go Open, Go Free Using OER workshop series started today with a cohort of 9 faculty and lecturers ready to discover how they can incorporate open educational resources into their courses.  You’ll be hearing more about their experiences in this workshop, what they’re learning and what they hope to do with OER in the future.

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