Library News and Much More!

October 16, 2017
by Wayde Oshiro
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UHCC OER Initiative, OpenEd 17, OpenStax Business, UH OpenStax Adoptions

UHCC System OER Initiative

Vice-President John Morton is providing $140,000 in FY 2018 to support OER initiatives across the UHCC system. Each campus will receive $15,000-$20,000 for OER awareness, conference travel (see below), faculty training, and other support costs. A portion of the funding will go towards supporting capacity building and collaboration across the system. Coordinating this initiative are Wayde Oshiro, Sunyeen “Sunny” Pai (Kapiolani), and Leanne Riseley.

Open Education 2017

The annual Open Education conference was held in Anaheim, CA on October 11-13. Nearly 800 teaching faculty, librarians, instructional designers, and administrators attended the three-day conference focusing on all things related to OER, open education, and open practice. Many sessions focused on the “Z-degree” initiatives at colleges, college systems, and states that are already implemented or are in development.  A Z-degree provides a complete pathway to graduation with zero textbook costs.

The UH System was represented by 10 faculty and staff representing librarians, instructors, and instructional designers from UH Manoa and 5 UHCC campuses (Honolulu, Kapiolani, Leeward, Maui, and Windward). Two conference sessions shared the progress of UH System OER initiatives.

Collaboration and Contrast: How University of Hawaii Librarians Collaborate to Promote OER Across Contrasting Campuses and Cultures

Empowering Faculty and Staff to Use OER at the University of Hawai’i

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University of Hawaii attendees at OpenEd 17 in Anaheim, CA

Conference attendance for UHCC attendees was supported by the UHCC OER Initiative funds from Vice-President John Morton.


UH OpenStax Textbook Adoptions

OpenStax textbooks have been adopted by faculty across the UH System. View a list of faculty-reported adoptions* of OpenStax textbooks to see which titles on each campus are being used in teaching.

OpenStax Adoptions Titles- All UH Campuses

*These are adoptions as reported to OpenStax by individual faculty members.


OpenStax Business Series in Development

OpenStax, the premier publisher of peer-reviewed open textbooks, is beginning the development of business titles and they are actively seeking faculty partners.

Nicole Finkbeiner, Associate Director, Institutional Relations shared the news recently:

OpenStax is in the beginning stages of developing a business series (expected publication in 2019)!
All OpenStax, Rice University OER texts are expert-written, peer-reviewed, match standard scope and sequence, and meet the same quality standards as traditional publisher texts. Currently, our texts are used in over 10% of introductory courses in the U.S. (per 2016 Babson Survey). 
Faculty who author/contribute/peer-review the texts receive compensation (the contact below can provide details).
Can you please forward this to your faculty? 
I’ve also included some details below on some upcoming webinars we are hosting.
I hope you all have a good day!
Nicole
Author/Reviewer needs
Please ask faculty to reach-out to the contact listed for each book vs. emailing me. 
Principles of Accounting
Contributing Authors (chapter writers, feature writers)
Reviewers (core, expert, generalist, accuracy verification)
Art Consultant
Contact: Alisha McCarthy, amccarthy@wisewire.com
 
Entrepreneurship
Contributing Authors (chapter writers)
Reviewers (core, expert, generalist)
Contact: Alisha McCarthy, amccarthy@wisewire.com
 
Business Ethics
Contributing Authors (chapter writers)
Reviewers (expert, generalist)
Contact: Alisha McCarthy, amccarthy@wisewire.com

 

Principles of Management
Chapter Reviewers 
Instructor’s Manual author
Contact: Michael Roche, Editor, m.roche@sixredmarbles.com
 
Introduction to Business
Chapter Reviewers
Test bank, Instructor’s manual author
Contact: Michael Roche, Editor, m.roche@sixredmarbles.com
 
Organizational Behavior
Chapter Authors
Chapter Reviewers
Test bank, Instructor’s manual author
Contact: Michael Roche, Editor, m.roche@sixredmarbles.com
 
Webinars
Business Statistics webinar
With author Alexander Holmes, University of Oklahoma
Developmental Math (Prealgebra, Elementary Algebra, Intermediate Algebra) webinar
With author Lynn Marecek, Santa Ana College

OpenStax and OER, a quick overview webinar
Short, general webinar about OpenStax and OER

September 23, 2017
by Wayde Oshiro
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An Economic Argument for Economics OER

The following was originally published on the UH OER blog on September 5, 2017,

This guest post was written by John Lynham, grant recipient and project lead developing OER for the ECON 130 microeconomics undergraduate course at UHM.

One of the questions I sometimes ask students in my introductory Principles of Microeconomics class is “Why are textbooks so expensive compared to other books?”. Part of the reason is that the market for textbooks is not like the market for other books: the person who chooses the book isn’t actually the person who pays for it. Most of the time, when you want to buy a new book you go to a bookstore (or online), choose the book that you want and then pay for it. But with textbooks, the professor chooses the book and then the students in the class have to go out and pay for it. This creates a disconnect between the person demanding the book and the person actually paying for it. In economics jargon: demand is “inelastic” or less responsive to changes in price. If the price of a textbook goes up by 10% many professors might not even notice since they never have to buy the book themselves. In addition, for some reason I can never figure out, the Instructors’ Edition of the textbook that professors receive for free never lists the price of the book on the back…

It shouldn’t be too surprising then that textbook prices increased 300% from 1986 to 2004 but the prices of most other goods only increased 80%. One of the most popular textbooks for the class I teach has a list price of $249.95! You can buy a new hardback edition of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone on Amazon for $16.16. I know which one I would prefer to read! In response to the exorbitant cost of textbooks, I started using a free Creative Commons (CC) licensed OpenStax textbook a few years ago. It’s a very good book, my students really like it, and I always encourage other faculty members to adopt it.

Click here to read the entire post.

September 11, 2017
by Wayde Oshiro
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$tudents $ave with OER & Textbook Cost: $0

" "Leeward continues to lead the system with OER and zero-textbook cost courses this Fall.

Total student enrollment in the 289 Textbook Cost: $0 courses is 5,371. Ninety-two instructors are teaching Textbook Cost: $0 courses this semester. Direct cost savings to students for Fall 2017 is $512,630. Average savings per enrolled student is $95.

Since 2014, Leeward faculty making the leap from commercial textbooks to OER and zero-cost have saved students an estimated $1,627,749!

Hats off to Leeward faculty for making the tough decision to opt out of the commercial textbook marketplace. Not only have you saved your students $$$, but your actions are having a direct impact on the for-profit textbook publishers and their heretofore unchallenged pricing strategies. This has led to lower price inflation in the textbook market. Competition is a good thing.

For many of you, the time and effort spent converting to OER were not inconsequential. However, your hard work has resulted in great benefits for both you and your students, including:

  • Freedom from high costs. OER is zero-cost to students.
  • No mandated edition changes. OER gives you full control over the content.
  • Materials are customizable according to your specific teaching needs. OER is openly-licensed for you to use.
  • No restrictions on access. OER is available to all students from day one and beyond. No time limits.

Want to learn more?

Textbook Cost: $0 infographic showing Fall 2017 figures: 289 Textbook Cost: $0 courses; 5300+ enrollment; 27% of total courses at Leeward are Textbook Cost: $0. Breakdown of courses by division. Leading divisions with OER courses are Social Sciences, Language Arts, Arts & Humanities & Math & Sciences

View this infographic online at https://magic.piktochart.com/output/24165646-textbook-cost-0-fall-2017-copy

9/12/17: Infographic updated to use the correct name for the Business division.

August 28, 2017
by Wayde Oshiro
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Notice: ScienceDirect Access Ends on December 31

Access to the ScienceDirect Freedom Collection with 2,298 journal titles published by Elsevier ends on December 31, 2017.

Our access to ScienceDirect is via a UH System Libraries consortial arrangement coordinated by UH-Manoa, Hamilton Library. Manoa has carried most of the costs over the years and we are grateful for their generosity to the other campuses. Unfortunately, due to budget constraints, they can no longer afford to maintain this resource under existing terms.

Elsevier journals are expensive and it would be difficult for Leeward to afford a journal package let alone a single journal title in many cases. Recently, a group of German universities canceled their Elsevier contracts en masse to put pressure on the Dutch publisher during contract negotiations. Universities in other countries such as Taiwan and Finland have made similar attempts to force the publisher to agree to more favorable pricing and to guarantee that publicly-funded research will remain open access. Will that pressure tactic work here? It’s possible but it will be difficult due to our relatively small size and Manoa’s need to cut costs.

Our EBSCOHost Academic Search Complete database includes many Elsevier titles. However, these titles are under a publisher (Elsevier) embargo. The embargo means that recently published articles are not available until 6-18 months after publication. Back issues are full text.

ScienceDirect will be available through the end of the year. After it ends, the library will still provide full-text article coverage to nearly 25,000 journal titles through Academic Search Complete. I am open to hearing your concerns about the loss of this resource and to discuss what options we have for access to scholarly resources. Contact me to schedule a meeting or send an email to waydeo@hawaii.edu.

Lastly, this is an issue important to higher education. The loss of the Elsevier titles is upsetting because these are prestige scholarly publications that are respected and relied upon for current research in your disciplines. Unfortunately, academic publishers have used this (prestige) to their advantage and employ practices that result in exorbitant costs and restricted access. It’s unbelievable to think that publications like Cell require authors to pay up to $5000 to publish an article on research that is often publicly funded. After paying that fee you would think that the authors would at least have access to their article, but no. The article is published behind a pay wall and is only available if the individual or institution, i.e. library, pays for it. In this instance, a one-year institutional subscription to Cell is $2020 per year. This is the major reason why open access (scholarly publishing) and open educational resources (teaching materials) are such important issues that we need to address.

  • 9/5/17: This post was updated to remove confidential pricing information.
  • 9/6/17: Updated to clarify that it is the current UH System Libraries consortial agreement with Elsevier that is ending.

June 6, 2017
by Wayde Oshiro
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UHM OER Grant Project: Open Physics Database

Mechanical engineering junior at the University of Hawaii Manoa, Ana, demonstrates conservation of angular momentum. (27 seconds)

Since 2015, the UH Mānoa Department of Physics and Astronomy has used the OpenStax College Physics textbook to teach introductory physics courses. Now, a faculty-led project funded by an Outreach College UHM OER Project grant is developing a database of physics problems that can be paired with the open textbook.

Learn more about this exciting project from project lead Christina Nelson at http://oer.hawaii.edu/an-open-physics-database-for-students-learning-with-oer/

Have questions about OER? Get in touch with your Leeward OER Team:

  • Junie Hayashi, Public Services Librarian
  • Wayde Oshiro, Head Librarian
  • Leanne Riseley, Educational Media Center Coordinator

February 7, 2017
by Wayde Oshiro
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Reusing, Revising, and Remixing OER

You’ve heard about the potential of OER to reduce educational costs for students, but what does it mean for you as an instructor besides a potentially longer to do list?

One of the greatest benefits that OER has to offer is the freedom to reuse, remix, revise, redistribute, and retain resources licensed as ‘open’ without worrying about copyright. How many times have you wondered whether you were violating copyright law?

Reusing OER involves taking available open materials and adopting them ‘as is.’  It’s similar process to selecting a publisher’s textbook. Moving up the ladder, revising and remixing requires a higher level of involvement and commitment because you are a modifying a resource (or resources) to better meet your teaching needs.  Yes, there is work involved and it can be substantial but the end result promises better materials for your exact(ing) needs. Billy Meinke, UHM OER Technologist, has a fantastic post describing the revising and remixing process in a little more detail.  (Say it like you mean it: Describing revision and remixing of OER)

Leeward’s seven-week Go Open, Go Free Using OER workshop series started today with a cohort of 9 faculty and lecturers ready to discover how they can incorporate open educational resources into their courses.  You’ll be hearing more about their experiences in this workshop, what they’re learning and what they hope to do with OER in the future.

October 24, 2016
by Wayde Oshiro
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What is Open Access?

Open Access (OA) is a movement seeking to make scholarly research freely available to the widest possible audience.  The goal of OA is to advance knowledge through communication and sharing. Sound familiar?  Open Education and OER have roots in OA. All three share a common philosophy of democratizing access to knowledge through a structured framework which gives individuals flexible rights (e.g. Creative Commons) to use existing knowledge to accelerate new discoveries and innovation in the research lab,  the classroom, and elsewhere.  Learn more about OA by viewing this animation, Open Access Explained!

open access week t-shirt logoUH is celebrating Open Access Week, October 24-28th, by hosting a series of events throughout the week. View the complete schedule here.  On Tuesday, October 25th, the Leeward OER Committee is hosting a live viewing of the panel discussion: Copyright, Intellectual Property, Creative Commons & Fair Use via HITS in LC 108B at 10:30 AM.

Topics include:

  • Key points to consider when using Open Access materials or creating your own;
  • Copyright maximalism in the information age;
  • Creative Commons licenses, including examples in our everyday lives; and
  • Four factors of the Fair Use doctrine and how to apply them.

Presenters:

Brian Huffman, Electronic Services Librarian and teaches Scholarly Research at William S. Richardson School of Law.

Debora Halbert, Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and the author of The State of Copyright, the co-edited Handbook of Intellectual Property.

Billy Meinke, OER Technologist for the UHM Outreach College; formerly at Creative Commons, specializing in education applications of their open licenses.

Peter Shirts, Music & Audiovisual Librarian, Acting Head of Sinclair Library & the Wong Audiovisual Center.

For more info about this panel, contact Junie Hayashi at junie@hawaii.edu

September 15, 2016
by Wayde Oshiro
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Textbook Prices Up 88 Percent

Textbook costs continue to rise faster than overall college costs.  The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports

From January 2006 to July 2016, the Consumer Price Index for college tuition and fees increased 63 percent, compared with an increase of 21 percent for all items. Over that period, consumer prices for college textbooks increased 88 percent and housing at school (excluding board) increased 51 percent.

The student cost for an Open Educational Resources textbook?  $0

An interactive graph is available at http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2016/college-tuition-and-fees-increase-63-percent-since-january-2006.htm

Bureau of Labor statistics chart showing 88 percent increase in college textbook costs since 2006

June 15, 2016
by Wayde Oshiro
0 comments

National OER Degree Initiative Announced

Achieving the Dream recently announced an initiative supporting the development of new degree programs using OER at 38 community colleges across the country.  According to ATD, the “effort is intended to spark more rapid adoption of OER within higher education, beginning with community colleges.” At the completion of the initiative all OER courses will be available to non-participating institutions.  Learn more about this initiative here.

Projects such as the ATD OER Degree Initiative are supporting the development of OER in many subject areas.  Since there is no single place online to find OER, the Leeward Library maintains a guide to help faculty get started.  Our OER LibGuide is available here.

Finally, the EMC and Library maintain the OER @ Leeward website where you can learn more about Leeward’s efforts to encourage and support faculty in using OER.  You’ll find a lot of useful information here but please don’t hesitate to contact us with your questions.

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