Learning with Technology

for Teaching

January 26, 2018
by Rachael Inake
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Leeward OER Spring 2018 Update

Here’s a quick re-cap on what’s happening with Open Educational Resources (OER) at Leeward CC.

Open Textbook Network

The Open Textbook Network (OTN) is an alliance of over 600 higher education institutions promoting access, affordability, and student success through the use of open textbooks. OTN maintains the Open Textbook Library, a collection of 453 peer-reviewed open textbooks. The UHCC system recently joined this growing community of open education advocates. Our membership allows UHCC OER advocates to participate in discussions with regional and national leaders, share best practices with other members, and tap into the collective expertise of the network. A highlight this year is an upcoming visit by two presenters from OTN coinciding with HSSI, March 28-29. A presentation is planned for Day 1 and a train-the-trainer workshop on Day 2. The all-day workshop at Honolulu CC is for individuals who will return to their home campuses as open textbook advocates and provide faculty with training opportunities. We are excited to participate in this network and share our successes with colleagues around the U.S.

Spring 2018 Textbook Cost: $0

Textbook Cost $0

Preliminary, we now have 273 sections at Leeward that are “textbook cost: $0” leading to a savings of $459,826 and a total savings to-date of $2,087,575. “Textbook cost: $0” “is a designation for a class that does not require students to purchase any course materials out-of-pocket. Classes may use a variety of Open Educational Resources (OERs), online resources, library resources, and faculty-authored materials to replace commercially-produced textbooks” (Go Open, Go Free).

“Go Open, Go Free Using OER” Spring 2018 Workshop

Go Open, Go Free Using OER

Are you interested in OER or going OER? Register today for the upcoming workshop series from February 13 to March 20 at 1:00 PM -2:30 PM. In this six-week workshop series, participants will learn about no-cost and Open Educational Resources (OER) which have the potential to replace costly commercial textbooks and other course materials.

Workshop Objectives:

  1. Articulating the value of OER in higher education
  2. Defining OER
  3. Distinguishing between openly licensed, public domain, and copyrighted materials
  4. Finding OER in your subject area
  5. Evaluating OER
  6. Understanding the differences in Creative Commons license types
  7. Combining different types of Creative Commons licensed materials
  8. Adding a Creative Commons license to your own work
  9. Giving proper attributions to OER

January 17, 2018
by Leanne Riseley
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Students as Authors through Open Pedagogy

It has been thrilling to see the Open Educational Resources (OER) Initiative takeoff at Leeward CC. Many instructors have successfully adopted and integrated OER into their classes. The initiative has reduced costs for students and increased student success. As we continue the push toward openness, we would like to encourage you to consider open pedagogy. While there is no single definition of open pedagogy, here is a definition:

Open pedagogy takes OER as a jumping-off point for rethinking the relationship between teachers, students, and knowledge. If teachers and students can now modify their textbooks and learning materials, we shift the student emphasis to contribution to knowledge as opposed to simple consumption of knowledge. Teachers and students become learners together, and “content” becomes a dynamic, always changing category with which we engage rather than a stable set of facts to be mastered. (DeRosa) Submitted by Heather M. Ross

It is always helpful to see examples from other instructors. Here one we would like to share.


Gloria NilesThe following is a guest blog post by Gloria Niles, PhD, Assistant Professor in Education, UH West Oahu.

After completing a 7-week OER training offered through Leeward Community College in Spring 2017, I had a renewed commitment to reducing or eliminating textbook cost for my courses by using instructional materials that are openly sourced.  I soon realized that projects I already assign could be used to teach my students to openly source and share their work with a global audience. Later, I realized this process had a term, which is  Open Pedagogy.

One assignment, in particular, has evolved over the past three years through Open Pedagogy. EDEE 324 is a required courses in the Elementary Education concentration for Education majors at UHWO. The ʻIke Ola Pono (Health Literacy) Digital Storybook Project is a assignment for Health, Physical Education and Movement (EDEE 324) at the University of Hawaiʻi-West Oʻahu (UHWO). I began this assignment in Fall 015, initially inspired by the Health Literacy Database at Miami University directed by Valerie Ubbes, Ph.D. My initial intention was to create an authentic assessment for teacher candidates (students) in an online course. As the project has evolved, my focus on Open Pedagogy has increased.

The objective of the ʻIke Ola Pono Digital Storybook project is for teacher candidates to develop a children’s story that incorporates aspects of Dr. Ubbes’ Habits of Health and Habits of Mind Model in a story that is culturally responsive to Hawaiian ways of knowing. In 2017, I incorporated the Hawaiʻi Department of Education’s Nā Hopena Aʻo (learning outcomes), adding a requirement that the story align with the Nā Hopena Aʻo as well as Hawaii Content and Performance Standards III for Health.

Beginning in 2017, teacher candidates were encouraged to add a Creative Commons license (which allows individuals to share their work, but retain copyright) to their storybook, and have their book included in the Mālama Honua Digital Storybook Series. In June 2017, the first titles in the series were shared publicly as part of the Mālama Honua Fair, celebrating the homecoming of the Hōkūleʻa. This event provide the authors the opportunity to showcase their work. As the teacher candidates shared their books with visitors who stopped by the UHWO exhibit space, it was heartwarming to observe the pride the authors had as children were reading their digital book on tablets and laptop computers. Parents and teachers were downloading the QR code to share the storybooks with their children and students.

Some teacher candidate are excited, and other are a bit intimidated at the start of the semester, when they learn they will be required to author and illustrate a children’s book. However, once they review the resources available through articles, videos, and websites, the trepidation turns to enthusiasm. Additionally, reviewing the titles in the Mālama Honua Series provides motivation and desire to see their story included in the series at the end of the course.

In addition to providing a collection of resources to support the process of writing childrenʻs literature and various media that can be used to illustrate their story, I scaffold this semester long project into steps, beginning with formation of peer review teams. During the first week of class, students join a peer review team of 4 to 5 students. The peer review teams each have a private discussion forum where they can share resources, and submit the stages of their project for feedback and review from their teammates. Providing feedback to their teammates also tends to strengthen their own project, and provides a support system.

The first submission is the ʻIke Ola Pono Digital Storybook Plan. Teacher candidates are provided with a planning template to scaffold the planning of their storybook, and identify how the story alignments with standards and outcomes.

The second step is the submission of the First Draft. This includes the manuscript and a storyboard for the conceptual design of the illustrations. Instructor and peer review feedback is provided. I also evaluate the manuscript for the readability level, using Readable.io. This tool provides feedback to determine if the manuscript is written at an appropriate reading level for the target age or grade level.

The third step is the submission of the Final Draft. This is the complete book in a digital format, with text and illustrations in the book format layout. Feedback is provided once again by peer review teammates as well as the instructor.

The published version is the final version of the storybook, submitted as the signature assignment. In the published version, the author is asked to add two lesson activities that can be used to extend learning opportunities, as well as the alignment to Health Education standards and the Nā Hopena Aʻo.

As the instructor, I serve as the editor for the series. As editor, my job is to ensure that illustrations that are not original artwork are correctly attributed, and overall professionalism of the published version. Not every ʻIke Ola Pono Digital Storybook submitted is represented in the series. However, as the series has grown to 23 titles, each semester the teacher candidate seem increasingly motivated to self-assess and produce a high quality project.

In order to continue the evolution of Open Pedagogy, ideas that I am considering are for teacher candidates to revise, remix, reuse titles in the Mālama Honua Digital Storybook Series. I am also planning Read-Aloud events where authors from the previous semester will read their book to children in local libraries, and in elementary school classrooms.

Key Takeaways

  • Model Use openly licensed instructional materials in your course (articles, textbooks, videos, podcasts, websites.)
  • Authentic assessment. Students are creating a meaningful product that will have an audience.
  • Scaffold Divide a semester-long project into incremental steps with formative feedback and reflection.
  • Self-assessment: Involve students in self-assessment of their work and classroom performance
  • Peer review. Use peer review for support and for improving student work.

My Ola Lunch by Rapunzel YaoFamily Kuleana by Macy ThoemmesKa Kumu Kawelo Papa by Justine MercadoHealthy Me, Healthy You by Kellie OshiroKa Nalu by Malia Rossetti

 

 

 

 

Sampling of screenshots above are from Mālama Honua Digital Storybook Series. Each storybook has been licensed by the student author under a Creative Commons license.

January 9, 2018
by Leanne Riseley
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Professors Share How Their Learning Environment Changed Their Teaching


Video from “A New High-Tech Learning Center Changed How These Professors Teach” by Julia Schmalz from Chronicle of Higher Education (6:17)

Three instructors are highlighted in the video sharing how they design their instruction around the physical space and technology in the classroom. This video highlights teaching strategies such as:

  • active learning
  • paired activities
  • collaborative learning

Gregory Staley, Director of Honors Humanities at University of Maryland at College Park says:

“This room made me rethink how I was going to approach the teaching of this material”.

“I changed first of all how I use PowerPoint. Instead of laying out in my PowerPoint what I wanted to say, I laid-out what I wanted them to say. You don’t go into this profession I think unless you love talking, so I had to put myself more in the background and to bring students to the fore. What you do as a teacher is to enable them to learn”.

 

November 20, 2017
by junie
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OpenEd17

The 14th annual OpenEd17 conference was held in Anaheim, CA on October 11-13. Nearly 800 teaching faculty, librarians, instructional designers, and administrators attended the three-day conference focusing on all things related to Open Educational Resources (OER), open education, and open practice. Many sessions focused on the “Z-degree” initiatives at colleges, college systems, and states that are already implemented or are in development.  A “Z-degree” provides a complete pathway to graduation with zero textbook costs.

The UH System was represented by 10 faculty and staff representing librarians, instructors, and instructional designers from UH Manoa and 5 UHCC campuses (Honolulu, Kapiolani, Leeward, Maui, and Windward). Conference attendance for UHCC attendees was supported by the UHCC OER Initiative funds from Vice-President John Morton.

UH attendees at OpenEd 17

University of Hawaii attendees at OpenEd 17 in Anaheim, CA

Two conference sessions shared the progress of UH System OER initiatives. Our own Wayde Oshiro, Head Librarian and Sunny Pai, Digital Initiatives Librarian, Kapiʻolani Community College presented on the progress of OER in the UHCC system.

Collaboration and Contrast: How University of Hawaii Librarians Collaborate to Promote OER Across Contrasting Campuses and Cultures

Billy Meinke, OER Technologist, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa presented on the progress of OER at University of Hawai’i.

Empowering Faculty and Staff to Use OER at the University of Hawai’i

For more information about OER and how you can get involved, please see the Go Open, Go Free Using Open Educational Resources @ Leeward website.

October 23, 2017
by Rachael Inake
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Fall 2017 OER at Leeward CC

Once a month, the OER Campus Committee will share information about OER to raise awareness, promote, encourage, and support using OER at Leeward CC.

We are launching our first post, today, in the spirit of International Open Access Week (October 23 -29, 2017) to inform the campus about what OER is, why it matters, and what Leeward CC is doing.

What is OER?

Open Educational Resources (OER) are “teaching, learning, and research resources that reside in the public domain or have been released under an intellectual property license that permits their free use and re-purposing by others” (Hewlett Foundation). In other words:

  • OER is free to use; no strings attached
  • No permission is needed since the creator already grants it through a Creative Commons (CC) license
  • You can retain OER indefinitely
  • You can choose to modify OER to meet your teaching needs per rights granted by the license

Why does OER matter?

  • Saves students money
    • 25% of total college costs for Leeward students is for textbooks and supplies
    • Half of community college students rely on financial aid to pay textbook costs
    • 65% of these students use financial aid to pay for all textbook costs
  • Grants access to more choices of materials
  • Materials are publicly available for students to access before and after taking a course
  • Flexibility to customize or mashup several OER to create custom resources for your students

What is happening at Leeward CC?

Leeward CC supports “Textbook Cost: $0” and using OER. We have an OER Campus Committee, workshops, fellowship program, and more to support using OER at Leeward CC. See the infographic below for information and statistics for “Textbook Cost: $0.”

Textbook Cost: $0 infographic

Our numbers continue to increase regarding “Textbook Cost: $0” courses, students enrolled, subjects, and instructors.

Fall 15 Spr 16 Fall 16 Spr 17 Fall 17
“Textbook Cost: $0” CRN (sections) (% of all CRNs) 55 148 217 (19%) 279 (23%) 289 (27%)
Students enrolled in “Textbook Cost: $0” classes 2643 4194 5121 5371
“Textbook Cost: $0” different subjects 12 63 69 111 91
“Textbook Cost: $0” instructors 16 49 71 91 92

How can you get involved?

Be a part of this initiative to “Go Open, Go Free at Leeward CC” and use “Textbook Cost: $0” and/or OER materials in your classes. Contact the Library or EMC to get started. Also, visit our OER website for more information.

October 23, 2017
by Brent Hirata
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Side-by-Side Comparison of Classroom Video Capture Devices

As a follow up to my earlier post on Swivl C5 Iʻve captured a real world comparison of a Swivl C5 a stationary iPad and a stationary video camera for capturing teaching. The following excerpts came from a training session I facilitated on Nearpod engagement tool. Each device recorded simultaneously and are presented without enhancements to video or audio. The three devices and setups that I used to record content for this comparison were:

  1. Swivl C5 auto-tracker with iPad (1280×720)
  2. Stationary iPad (640×480)
  3. Stationary Camera (1920×1080)

“Clip 3 Observations” (2:25)

This clip features instructor movement through class space, student questions and commentary. Swivl wins for audio quality (Video 1 vs. Video 3), video quality and composition. Statonary iPad is definitely not the way to go since it canʻt  follow the instructor (Video 2).

Video 1: Swivl Auto-tracker 😊

  • Auto-tracker camera follows instructor.
  • Student and instructor voice quality using Swivl wireless microphones.

Video 2: iPad Stationary 😩

  • Instructor off screen, camera faces wall, no visible action occurring in video, viewer loose interest.
  • Audio soft as instructor moves away from device.  No additional microphones.

Video 3: Video Cam Stationary 😐

  • Instructor off screen for a portion of the video. The left half of the room did not fit in the wide shot.
  • Audio sounds hollow.  Picks up ambient room buzz.

“Clip 4 Observations” (1:25)

Traditional lecture position with no movement.  Swivl wins for audio quality and for video quality because it is a closer shot of the instructor (Video 1 vs. Video 3).

Video 1: Swivl Auto-tracker 😊

  •  Student and instructor voice quality using Swivl wireless microphones.

Video 2: iPad Stationary 😐

  • Video quality is a little fuzzy, but that is primarily because of the iPads resolution.
  • Audio a little soft.

Video 3: Video Cam Stationary 😐

  • Audio sounds hollow.  Picks up ambient room buzz.

“Clip 5 Observations” (2:45)

Instructor starts off in the front of the room and moves to the back of the room.  In the beginning of the video the Swivl did take a few seconds to keep up but overall got the job done. Swivl wins for audio and video quality and composition.

Video 1: Swivl Auto-tracker 😐

  • Auto-tracker camera follows instructor.  As I was walking my body shielded the lanyard from view which resulted in the Swivl taking a few seconds to find me.
  • As I was engaging with the students I was able to ask questions and receive answers. Student and instructor voice quality using Swivl wireless microphones.

Video 2: iPad Stationary 😩

  • Instructor off screen, no visible action occurring in video, viewers will loose interest.
  • Audio soft as instructor moves away from device.  No additional microphones.

Video 3: Video Cam Stationary 😐

  •  Instructor off screen for a portion of the video. The left half of the room did not fit in the wide shot.
  • Audio sounds hollow.  Picks up ambient room buzz.

“Clip 6 Observations” (00:45)

This shot features the audio of student helping student while instructor converses with other students. With the Swivl student microphones you can notice the difference (Check out Video 1 vs. Video 2).  While Video 3 picks up student conversation the video composition is poor.

Video 1: Swivl Auto-tracker 😊

  • Student helping student audio captured with Swivl wireless student microphones.

Video 2: iPad Stationary 😩

  • Instructor off screen, no visible action occurring in video, viewers will loose interest.
  • Audio soft as because of distance from device.  No additional microphones.

Video 3: Video Cam Stationary 😐

  • The left half of the room did not fit in the wide shot.  Instructor interactions with other students in the room not captured.
  • Audio picks up student to student conversation but also picks up ambient room buzz.

“Clip 7 Observations” (4:43)

This clip features instructor movement from the front of the room to the student area.  Swivl wireless microphones for instructor and student does a good job of capturing instructor and student audio.  Stationary cameras (Video 2 and Video 3) failed to capture full class in the view that Swivl (Video 1) did.

Video 1: Swivl Auto-tracker 😊

  • Auto-tracker camera follows instructor.  As I was walking my body shielded the lanyard from view which resulted in the Swivl taking a few seconds to find me.
  • Student and facilitator voice quality using Swivl wireless microphones.

Video 2: iPad Stationary 😩

  • Instructor off screen, no visible action occurring in video, viewers will loose interest.
  • Audio soft as instructor moves away from device.  No additional microphones.

Video 3: Video Cam Stationary 😩

  • The left half of the room did not fit in the wide shot.  Instructor interactions with other students in the room not captured.
  • Audio sounds hollow.  Picks up ambient room buzz.

Summary

I hope that these side by side comparisons helped to illustrate the benefits for using the right device in your workflow to capture your instruction. I found the stationary iPad was severely limited once the instructor move away from the front of the room.  In addition the audio was soft because there was only one microphone.  Alternatively I found the stationary video camera in the back of the room captured half of the room and the audio was noisy due to ambient noise.  I found the Swivl C5 successfully captured the session.  There were a few instances where body movement blocked the Swivl from seeing the transmitter, but that can be fixed with proper technique.  I appreciated that Swivl C5 balances close up video shots and entire classroom shots. In addition the audio with student and instructor wireless microphones was cleaner than the other cameras captured.

If you’re a Leeward CC faculty, lecturer, administrator, or staff member and are interested in using the Swivl C5, contact me, Brent Hirata, at bhirata@hawaii.edu.

September 18, 2017
by Brent Hirata
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A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words

Have you ever stared into the engine compartment of a vehicle and been fascinated by all those moving parts?   Now imagine being a student in the automotive field, building your professional knowledge of parts and terminology is an important first step toward being successful.  This week we are featuring Nolan Miyahara an Instructor of Automotive Technology  here at Leeward Community College who recently conducted a Nearpod activity with his students to review and reinforce their learning of basic parts.
 Nearpod Annotated Picture
Activity
Nearpod is a formative assessment tool for delivering engaging presentations. It does require an internet connection but does not require a Smart Classroom projector.  Each student sees the presentation on their own mobile device (phone, table, laptop) and the pace is controlled by the instructor.  Students’ interactions can be shared with their peers for class discussion or captured for easy reporting.  Nolan’s activity used Nearpod’s draw slide feature to allow individual students to match terms with images (engine parts) he provided.  Nolan thought the Nearpod draw activity worked well, he also took time to build a few Nearpod slides following a more traditional yes/no format.
Strengths and Weaknesses
Following the activity Nolan thought “the variety of ways you can put up questions and how the students can answer in different ways” was a strength.   Student feedback seemed to infer that students “didn’t feel challenged because there was no timer”, a problem which can be addressed in the future by simply having the instructor implement a time limit for each slide.
In Summary
Overall Nolan felt the Nearpod review activity went well based on learning and engagement.  When asked for tips or advice for other instructors interested in using Nearpod, Nolan said “I would recommend it.”
If you are interested in learning more about Nearpod and how a Nearpod lesson can be integrated into your rotation of activities please contact Brent Hirata (bhirata@hawaii.edu) at the Educational Media Center.

September 11, 2017
by Rachael Inake
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EMC’s Chromebook COW for Classroom Use

The following is a guest blog post by Junie Hayashi, Librarian, at Leeward CC.

Ever wanted to do an activity with your students that required everyone to have a computer (laptop, tablet, or smartphone) but didn’t have a computer classroom? Reserve the EMC’s Chromebook COW (classroom on wheels) that includes a set of 20 lightweight Chromebooks. The Chromebooks use Google Chrome browser for internet browsing and have both keyboards and touch screens. Although you cannot download software onto the Chromebooks, numerous apps are available from the Google Chrome Web Store.

chromebook cart

I provide library instruction sessions for various classes including English, Speech, Psychology, and Women’s Studies. Using the Chromebook COW, I am able to provide sessions in the classroom instead of having the class come to the Library. This is especially helpful when we have multiple sessions during the same class period. In addition, my sessions often include group work which is very difficult to do  in a traditional computer lab setting. Using the Chromebooks makes it easy for students to work together in a meaningful way. The COW is much smaller and easier to navigate than the previous one. Students have even told me that the Chromebooks were “cool” and way better than other laptops. Definitely check out the EMC’s new Chromebooks!

chromebook user

Looking to reserve/checkout the Chromebook COW? Visit the Intec window at LC 116 or request online. (Note: First time using the request form? Please contact the Help Desk so an account can be created for future reservations.)

August 21, 2017
by Rachael Inake
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Making your syllabus viewable in Laulima

The Syllabus tool in Laulima allows you to post your syllabus for your students to access.

To add the Syllabus tool:

  1. Log into Laulima.
  2. Click on your course site in the blue tabs across the top.
  3. Click on Site Info in the left menu of tools.
  4. Click on Edit Tools.
  5. Checkmark the Syllabus tool and click Continue and then Finish.
  6. Click on the Syllabus tool in the left menu and add your syllabus.

By default, the Syllabus tool is not published to students. To make it viewable to students, you’ll need to click the lightbulb icon ‘on’.

publish syllabus animated gif

And now to check/preview as a student, click the drop-down menu, “View site as:” at the top-right of your screen and choose “Student”. You should be able to see it. When you’re done, go back to the drop-down menu and select “Instructor.”

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