Learning with Technology

for Teaching

October 1, 2018
by Educational Media Center
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Multiple Realities

Infographic XR VR MR AR

Infographic XR VR MR AR

Have you noticed the subtle expansion in extended reality or XR in our daily lives?   Extended Reality or XR is the umbrella concept that covers a range of modified or extended experiences that take true reality and either recreate or overlay computer generated content.  This content can be broadly categorized into Virtual Reality, Mixed Reality, and Augmented Reality.

Virtual Reality is an established learning technology, however it can be a large investment in time and money.  VR does has many practical applications, and is worth doing in particularly situations where cost and safety are concerns.  For example investing resources in developing a VR for training an airline ground crew to service an airplane. Prior to VR an airline might have to remove a plane from service for crew training, in addition, using an airplane for training could prove costly if a training accident occurred.  In this example a fully immersive virtual reality learning experience may be worth doing.

Augmented Reality is an emerging technology and is a relatively accessible.   Augmented reality overlays computer generated content over a live image. For example the yellow First Down line on an football television broadcast or the strike zone box on a baseball broadcast.  Educators can experiment with an augmented reality tool called Zappar (first month free).  With the Zappar app, students can waive a mobile tablet or phone over an instructor setup image, illustration or text and have a video, audio, image, or web link pop up.  Static paper is a thing of the past, Zappar can bring them to life and it is relatively easy to do.   We recently shared it at Tech It Out Day 2018, if you are interested in Zappar and its applications for supporting student learning materials let us know.

Mixed Reality fills the space between computer generated world (VR) and real world with computer overlay (AR).  Like VR, Mixed Reality also requires a large investment of time and resources to develop. An example of MR is a theme park experience which mixes kinesthetic and sensory markers to enhance your experience.  For example watching a computer generated visual while physically being moved, or sprayed with water or sniffing scented air.

 

September 6, 2018
by Leanne Riseley
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Free Webinar: Inclusive PDFs by Design

 The National Center on Accessible Educational Materials

Tuesday, September 18, 2018
8:00 am – 9:00 am HST
Presenter: Luis Pérez, AEM Center

Designers of PDF documents take great pride in creativity and visual appeal. Did you know that PDFs can be accessible to readers with disabilities without sacrificing design? And when your materials are accessible, you’ll reach a wider and more diverse audience. Join this webinar to see how accessible PDF design is responsible, inclusive, and – yes – attractive.

Unable to attend the webinar?  No worries!  A recording will be available on the webinar’s Event Page approximately one week after the webinar.  An announcement will be sent when the recording is available.

REGISTER

10/17/18 update: The webinar recording is now available.

September 4, 2018
by Leanne Riseley
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Free OER Webinars

OER Open Educational ResourcesButte College is hosting a series of free “Introduction to OER” Webinars.  It is a 4-part series that is focused on orienting faculty who are new to OER.

The workshops are Fridays from 9 AM – 11 AM HST Time (Note: 11/9 and 12/14 are 10 AM – 12 PM due to daylight savings time).  The login for the webinars is: https://cccconfer.zoom.us/j/458705302

Dates and tentative Topics:

9/28 – Introduction to OER and Open Access

10/12 –Licensing and Search Strategies

11/9 – Universal Design and Accessibility

12/14 – Curation using Pressbooks and Open Pedagogy

More information is found on the Intro to OER Course Website: https://canvas.instructure.com/courses/1123092

Registration is not necessary. Webinars are free. Please feel free to share with your colleagues.

August 28, 2018
by Brent Hirata
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Capture your Teaching with Swivl

Simple and easy to use, our Swivl robotic tripod system is available for check out.  Faculty may borrow our Swivl kit (Swivl mount, iPad) to record themselves teaching.  Finished recordings can be saved or shared with others via Google Drive (no internet required to record).  This is a great tool if you are having trouble scheduling peers to sit in on your class for peer reviews.   The Swivl kit comes with an iPad for recording the video and wireless microphones to capture student questions and responses.  The Swivl base moves the iPad (camera) to always keep you in the frame as you move about the room teaching.   Check out our previous post illustrating the differences between a video camera, stationary iPad and iPad mounted on Swivl.   Please contact Brent (bhirata@hawaii.edu) in the Educational Media Center if you are interested in checking out Swivl.

August 21, 2018
by Rachael Inake
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Tech It Out Day 2018

We kicked off the fall 2018 semester on Monday, August 13 with Tech It Out Day, a free half-day event to explore how technology can enhance teaching and learning in the classroom and online. There were four tracks of four, 30-minute hands-on sessions with about 60 faculty and staff participating. It was also a time to reconnect with each other after the summer break and enjoy some tasty snacks and manapua!

tech it out day audience

tech it out day facilitator showing audience phone

Sessions were facilitated by the EMC Educational Technologists and Leeward CC instructors. Topics included:

  • using Google Team Drive for collaboration
  • engaging students with reading resources
  • augmenting reality
  • promoting student engagement with Pear Deck
  • creating interactive content for knowledge checks using H5P
  • using Zoom for synchronous web conferencing to interact with students online
  • blogging
  • using Google Sites for weekly modules and committee websites
  • giving video feedback to students through screencasting
  • and more!

Visit the Tech It Out Day website for more information, resources, and photos.

Participants commented:

I participate in tech it out day to see how others are using technology in their classrooms trying to visit those presentations that I think might possibly be useful in my teaching.

I liked the fact that the sessions covered online feedback; in class activity interaction; creating videos for students and creating websites.

I really enjoyed the sessions. The length of the sessions were perfect to get just enough to decide whether you need more assistance. Most of the sessions had a hands-on component that was really helpful. Thank you!

Thank you for having Tech it Out day! It’s really amazing to find out what’s out there to make life easier for people.

Mahalo to our facilitators, participants, and the Leeward Staff Development Funds. We hope you join us at next year’s Tech It Out Day… maybe even as a facilitator! The call for proposals will be emailed in March 2019.

August 20, 2018
by Leanne Riseley
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Free OER In-Person and Online Professional Learning Opportunities

Sharing some free OER professional development opportunities…

In-person OER Training on UH Manoa Campus

Online OER Training by OpenStax

Topics include:

  1. What is OER?
  2. What is OpenStax?
  3. Are OpenStax books high quality and are they really free? (spoiler alert: yes)
  4. How can my students and I access the books?
  5. Do you have other teaching resources?
  6. What about homework and courseware?

Tuesday, September 4 at 6 a.m. HST and Monday, September 17 at 9 a.m. HST.

Registration for Tuesday, September 4

Registration for Monday, September 17

May 31, 2018
by Rachael Inake
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Highlights from the “Course by Design” track at PRLS 2018

At this year’s annual Pacific Region Learning Summit (PRLS) at Leeward CC on May 14 to 18, Brent and I facilitated an updated version of our “Course by Design” workshop series from the one we offered last summer. Joining us this summer were:

  • Heather McCafferty – Math and Sciences, Leeward CC
  • Benjamin Zenk – Philosophy, Hawaii CC
  • Amy Shiroma – Hospitality & Tourism Education, Kapiolani CC
  • Don Maruyama – Culinary Arts, Leeward CC
  • Robert Oshita – Digital Media, Leeward CC
  • Sandro Jube – Human Anatomy & Physiology, Leeward CC

PRLS 2018 course by design track group

Using our updated four-step course design process for in-person classes, we guided instructors through systematically organizing and structuring their courses by aligning their course outcomes with appropriate learning activities. The four-step process consists of:

  1. Identifying student learning outcomes.
  2. Creating specific learning objectives.
  3. Creating activities to meet the learning objectives.
  4. Building your lessons on a website.

Participants used a planning worksheet (Google Doc) that guided them through each of the four steps. New to the process is mapping alignment of outcomes, objectives, and activities which greatly helped instructors to see all the pieces and how they relate to each other. Once they had everything mapped out, they started to build their lesson modules using our Google Sites template for a quick-start.

PRLS 2018 course by design mapping

The goal was to go through at least one cycle of the course design process to create one lesson module. Then you would repeat the process to create the rest of your lesson modules.

Participants who created at least one lesson module using the four-step course design process earned the “Course Designer Creator” badge of achievement that can be used as evidence in contract renewal/tenure/promotion dossiers.

At the end of the week, participants said the following:

Attending the “Course by Design” workshop was a great opportunity to reflect back at the course that I teach and implement new ideas and concepts to keep my students engaged and motivated. I will certainly implement if not all, at least some of the activities that I envisioned during the PRLS, and I am glad that we discussed about the development of rubrics to assist with the process of scoring the activities.

I’ve gotten a chance to look more closely at how my course activities align with my learning outcomes, and this has allowed me to cut a few unnecessary lessons and replace them with others that align.

Course by Design helped clarify the alignment of course level outcomes with modules and activities. It opened my mind to new connections, and I hope to take this knowledge and use it to re-work my class to improve the overall experience for the student.

We look forward to checking in with our participants and seeing what they create and how implementation goes!

May 3, 2018
by Rachael Inake
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Our Future is Open Access

A poem written by Ann Inoshita, Instructor of English at Leeward CC.

We must break the limits of the past
and construct new methods to collect and access
the contributions of all.

We must find answers at a faster rate
and unite our efforts to create breakthroughs.

We must participate in a free exchange of ideas
unbarred by bias.

We must embrace diversity as a strength
and realize that humility opens our minds to possibilities.

Problems have evolved and our minds must evolve
to support new ways to communicate and collect solutions.

Access to shared ideas is necessary
to learn and discover
beyond what we think is possible.

Ann Inoshita shares her poem, “Our Future is Open Access.”

poem

March 8, 2018
by Rachael Inake
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Kelsie’s OER Journey Continues

The following is a special guest blog post by: Kelsie Aguilera, Instructor of Anthropology, OER committee member, and graduate of the Go Open, Go Free Using OER workshop series.

Kelsie Aguilera profile

During the fall semester of 2016, I first shared with you my Open Educational Resources (OER) journey through a special guest blog post. I now wish to update you because some things have changed!

But, what has not changed is my support for OER and the global Open Education movement OER are a component of. There are so many barriers and challenges that our students face on their paths to academic and career success; purchasing an expensive textbook no longer has to be one of them. I now advocate for OER by serving on our campus OER committee along with serving on the Awareness subcommittee. Through my OER committee work, I am grateful for the many opportunities I have been given to share my experiences with OER to our campus and the community, such as being a guest speaker for the Go Open, Go Free Using OER track at the Pacific Region Learning Summit.

After taking the incredibly enriching Go Open, Go Free Using OER workshop series in 2016 and launching two of my courses as “$0 Textbook Cost” soon after, the response I have received from students has been overwhelmingly positive. I have received countless words of gratitude and thanks about going “$0 Textbook Cost” from students and no major critiques. In stark comparison, I used to receive countless complaints about the traditional textbook I used to assign. Furthermore, my success rates have increased since the switch. Although I cannot confidently attribute the increase to my adoption of free resources, many of which are OER, I like to believe that my efforts have made a positive impact.

Ultimately, I wanted to impart a note of encouragement to you. When I first heard about OER in 2013, I immediately became frustrated because I couldn’t find any suitable OER for anthropology. Thus, I abandoned the project until I took the Go Open, Go Free Using OER workshop series, which gave me the confidence and resources I need to take the leap. New OER materials are steadily being created and added to the movement. For example, an organization I am involved with, the Society for Anthropology in Community Colleges (SACC), recently released the first peer-reviewed, open access textbook for cultural anthropology called Perspectives: An open invitation to cultural anthropology.

Movements elicit change as the result of the participation of its supporters, so you can contribute to the OER movement too. I am doing my part; I am currently working with a dedicated group of SACC members to produce and edit an OER introductory biological anthropology textbook, which will be the first of its kind. If OER doesn’t work for you at the moment, don’t indefinitely rule it out. The movement keeps growing and evolving, and you can contribute to it, too, so that you can make OER work for you.

March 7, 2018
by Rachael Inake
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Why OER Was Appealing for Me

The following is a special guest blog post by: Lois-Lynn Deuel, Instructor of Psychology at Leeward CC.

Lois-Lynn Deuel profileMy path to using Open Educational Resources (OER) was not a hasty one. When I taught my first college course 25 years ago, I dutifully selected a well-known textbook for the spine of my course, promptly employed all of the publisher’s bells and whistles and creatively developed colorful PowerPoint presentations to organize my in-class lectures and facilitate student note-taking.

As my experience and expertise increased, a lot of things changed in my instructional style. I started incorporating more active learning activities, stopped using the “death by PowerPoint” approach and adopted a number of flipped classroom techniques. Most importantly, I began a slow drift away from using the textbook as the foundation in my courses.

Why was OER appealing to me?

  • Each semester, more and more students were not purchasing the textbook, purchasing a really old edition, using a “similar textbook,” or depending on the University of Google. I found the potential of increased access for ALL students to be very appealing.
  • In a similar vein, access from DAY ONE and continued access long after the course has ended (something that is not possible if students have rented or resold their textbooks) gives students a substantive and permanent resource.
  • I wasn’t making use of the entire textbook. Each year, I would “require” fewer pages to be read and leave some chapters as “optional reading.”
  • I was using an increased number of supplements to address shortcomings in the textbook, e.g., short YouTube videos that succinctly explained course concepts, popular literature with meaningful examples, clips from movies, TV shows and the news.
  • Even with new editions every few years—the information in textbooks was immediately out-of-date. I was making corrections “on the fly,” and sharing stories about cutting-edge research that was YEARS from making it into a textbook.

Last year, I participated in the OER Workshop offered through PRLS. My initial intention was to increase my technical knowledge and learn about more scholarly resources that I could systematically use to beef up the supplementary materials for my courses—like an “OER Lite” to accompany the textbook. As the week progressed, I decided that an OER text along with my existing supplementary materials might be an option. It would certainly save my students money.

Unfortunately, the next thing I came to realize during the PRLS week was that there were no existing OER texts for Developmental Psychology. If I wanted something better for my students (i.e., higher quality, up-to-date, more relevant, better explanations and examples, more efficient or concentrated learning), I was going to have to make it myself—an OER mash-up using hundreds of different resources.

The PRLS workshop on OER gave me the confidence to try (WARNING: Junie, Wayde, and Leanne are really sweet, helpful and persuasive!). So, I decided to take the plunge.

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