Learning with Technology

for Teaching

June 6, 2019
by Les
0 comments

INBRE Student Scientists

EMC Video Production Unit Captures Amazing Student Scientists Conducting Research at Leeward Community College

For the last 17 years, Leeward Community College has provided students opportunities to conduct research projects that actually contribute data to larger biomedical research efforts.

Each summer, teams of students are recruited to be part of INBRE, the IDeA Network for Biomedical Research Excellence, a program of the National Institutes of Health.  Under the guidance of Professors Kabi Neupane and Helmut Kae, these students learn research techniques and lab skills in well-equipped labs right here on campus. They collaborate with researchers at UH Manoa, making contributions that have real scientific impact. Even more, their work could ultimately have global implications, feeding the hungry, increasing agricultural productivity, curing presently little understood diseases.

A few months ago, the EMC’s Video Unit partnered with Drs. Neupane and Kae to document the activities of these remarkable students…and they are remarkable. These young scientists are amazingly comfortable, knowledgeable, and poised in the lab environment. They are mature and eloquent, and all of them demonstrate an impressive level of passion and excitement for their projects. The videos produced help to highlight the professionalism and quality of the program.

Dr. Neupane, Campus Coordinator for the INBRE program expressed his appreciation for the work the Video Production Unit provided. “We are extremely pleased with the high quality work and care of the Media Center Video Production staff. We would love to continue the partnership in future. The videos made will be used to highlight our undergraduate research program at Leeward CC. This will help us in our recruitment process.”

Dr. Kae, the Campus Co-Coordinator, was also appreciative of the effort put forth by the production staff. When asked for his impressions he said he was “…quite amazed with the production quality. I wasn’t really sure what to expect, but it definitely exceeded anything that we imagined it would look like.” He added, “The staff was very professional, and extremely courteous. They put our students at ease during filming, and really made this process as smooth as possible. I really appreciated the fact that they were cognizant of the work that was going on, so they tried to be minimally disruptive throughout the process.”

We look forward to continuing this partnership with Drs. Kae and Neupane, and having the opportunity to work with more of their students. Aside from creating noteworthy videos for our campus programs, our staff gets great satisfaction and enjoyment in meeting and working with our inspirational young scientists.

To see the videos about this program and these amazing students,  click on this link:  INBRE Playlist.  If you would like to produce a video highlighting a project or event you’re involved with, contact the EMC Video Production Unit at ext. 0604, or submit a services request form at Video Services Request.

April 29, 2019
by Leanne Riseley
0 comments

Open Educational Resources Award Winners 2019

Open Educator Award

The Leeward Open Educator Award is an annual award which seeks to recognize faculty who promote or contribute to a culture of utilizing Open Educational Resources (OER) in the classroom.

Congratulations to Michael Cawdery!

Michael CawderyMichael has designated two (2) of his classes at TXT0 (Textbook Cost: $0). He has reached more than 500 students, saving them over $50,000.

As part of his dissertation and a Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grant with Leeward CC’s Associates in Arts in Teach (AAT) program, Michael facilitated the creation an OER website: Highlighting Effective Teaching Strategies Video Library (http://hets.leeward.hawaii.edu/).  With permission of students, parents, teachers, and administrators, the project visited over 30 classrooms and recorded more than 55 lessons in public and public charter schools over an 18-month period.  The website was a collaborative project between Michael, local education agencies, and David Fry who helped with the video and technical aspects of the project. The video library is designed to bring real-world examples and models of effective teaching practice to pre-service and in-service teachers.
The Leeward Open Educator Award is an annual award which seeks to recognize faculty who promote or contribute to a culture of utilizing Open Educational Resources (OER) in the classroom.
Award: $500
The goal of the LDORA is to create renewable assignments based on the principles of OER-Enabled Pedagogy which are designed to be used with specific open educational resources.

Congratulations to Tasha Williams & Rachael Inake!

Tasha WilliamsRachael InakeTasha and Rachael will be working together to create a renewable assignment for ENG 100. The renewable assignment will have students contribute to a chapter in an existing OER College Success textbook plus create ancillary materials for that chapter.

The goal of the LDORA is to create renewable assignments based on the principles of OER-Enabled Pedagogy which are designed to be used with specific open educational resources.

Incentive Award: $250 each

 

 

The goal of the LOERCA is to develop original OER materials where none exists or revise and remix existing OER with the addition of original content.

Congratulations to I-Chia Shih!

I-Chia ShihI-Chia Shih will be creating OER lab manuals for Leeward Anatomy and Physiology students (PHYL 141L and 142L). This project has the potential impact to save our students at least $16,662 within an academic year. While I-Chia will be building upon and remixing existing content, about 70% of the content will be originally created, peer-reviewed, and copyedited. I-Chia has established a collaboration with other Anatomy and Physiology faculty within the UH System and they plan to help each other with the development of OER resources across campuses.

The goal of the LOERCA is to develop original OER materials where none exists or revise and remix existing OER with the addition of original content.

Incentive Award: $3000

 

 

For more information on all of these Awards, please visit the Leeward CC OER Website.

February 18, 2019
by Leanne Riseley
0 comments

Winning with OER

The following awards have been designed to recognize Leeward CC instructors’ use or creation of Open Educational Resources (OER) or designing renewable assignments. Funds for these programs have been provided by the Office of the Vice President for Community Colleges at the University of Hawai’i.

Join the 2018 OER award recipients to hear more about their projects, the awards, and how to apply at the TGIF session on Friday, February 22, 2019 at 1:00 p.m. in BE 104.

Congratulations to P. Jayne Bopp!

The Leeward Open Educator Award is an annual award which seeks to recognize faculty who promote or contribute to a culture of utilizing Open Educational Resources (OER) in the classroom.
P. Jayne BoppThe Leeward Open Educator Award is an annual award which seeks to recognize faculty who promote or contribute to a culture of utilizing Open Educational Resources (OER) in the classroom. Award amount: $500.

Jayne has designated eight (8) of her classes as Textbook Cost: $0. She has saved students over $132,600.

Jayne’s OER journey included adopting an existing open textbook and openly licensing resources for four classes. She created two new resources where none existed before and openly licensed this content for others to use. Jayne created an OER activity for Sociology of the Family by adapting existing OER, applying a Creative Commons license to it, and sharing the modified OER in the UH OER Repository. Jayne also shared her experiences in a video produced by the Educational Media Center (EMC) and served as a guest speaker on a panel with Michelle Igarashi. Finally, Jayne participated in an OpenStax pilot test for Concept Coach, a homework tool for their introduction to sociology textbook. Jayne is a true champion for OER at Leeward.

Congratulations to Erika Molyneux and Rachael Inake!

The goal of the LDORA is to create renewable assignments based on the principles of OER-Enabled Pedagogy which are designed to be used with specific open educational resources.
Erika MolyneuxRachael Inake In a partnership between instructor and instructional designer, the goal of the LDORA is to create a renewable assignment based on the principles of OER-Enabled Pedagogy which are designed to be used with specific open educational resources. Award amount: $250 each.

Erika and Rachael created a renewable assignment for Digital Art. The renewable assignment had students create “how-to” videos on creating media using Photoshop. The student tutorials were licensed under Creative Commons and uploaded to a YouTube playlist. The playlist was linked to the instructor’s class modules. The tutorials are openly available to current students, future students, and the community. Erika and Rachael’s renewable assignment is available for others to retain, reuse, revise, remix, and redistribute under CC BY 4.0.

Congratulations to Kelsie Aguilera!

The goal of the LOERCA is to develop original OER materials where none exists or revise and remix existing OER with the addition of original content. Kelsie Aguilera

The goal of the LOERCA is to develop original OER materials where none exists or revise and remix existing OER with the addition of original content. Award amount: $3000.

Kelsie is serving as the managing editor and author of a high-quality, open access biological anthropology textbook with 100% original written content that will be written and peer-reviewed by experts in the field. It is the first of its kind and slated to be ready for use in Fall 2019. The edited book will be available free of charge under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 International License and housed on a website administered by the Society for Anthropology in Community Colleges (SACC), a professional anthropology organization that is part of the American Anthropological Association. In addition, this edited book will be made available on the University of Hawaii Open Educational Resources (OER) Repository and may be uploaded to UH Pressbooks.

Explorations Sample Book Cover

Apply for the 2019 OER Awards

If you are interested in applying for this year’s awards, visit the OER Award Programs and apply online. Deadline: March 15, 2019.

More at the TGIF Session

If you’d like to hear more or have questions, the OER awardees will be sharing and answering questions at an upcoming TGIF session on Friday, February 22, 2019 at 1:00 p.m. in BE 104.

TGIF 2018 OER award recipients flier

February 4, 2019
by Brent Hirata
0 comments

Don’t Just Stand There, Swivl

Swivl ProcessAre you interested in capturing a video of yourself teaching, but dread being stuck standing in one place for the whole time?  Has poor audio made your past recordings unusable?   Are you having trouble scheduling a peer review visit or need evidence of your teaching?  Break out of that frame of mind with the Swivl video tracking/ capturing system.  The EMC recently expanded to 3 Swivl capture kits, the Swivl will smoothly pan and tilt your mobile video device (or use ours) and follow you as you move throughout the classroom.   We agree that having great audio is really important, Swivl incorporates wireless microphones for you and an additional one for small groups.  Swivl is also a great tool if you are having trouble scheduling peers to review or capture evidence of your teaching.   Simple and easy to use, the Swivl robotic tripod system is available for instructors to check out from out EMC.   Finished recordings can be saved or shared with others via UH Google Drive.      Please contact Brent (bhirata@hawaii.edu) in the Educational Media Center if you are interested in checking out Swivl.

Advantages:

  • Be free to move around your classroom
  • Wireless (instructor & student) microphones
  • Mobile setup
  • No Internet required for recording (only for uploading later on)
  • No new sign up (Swivl app works with your UH Google)

Check out our previous post illustrating the differences between a video camera, stationary iPad and iPad mounted on Swivl.

Swivl Process

 

October 1, 2018
by Educational Media Center
0 comments

Multiple Realities

Infographic XR VR MR AR

Infographic XR VR MR AR

Have you noticed the subtle expansion in extended reality or XR in our daily lives?   Extended Reality or XR is the umbrella concept that covers a range of modified or extended experiences that take true reality and either recreate or overlay computer generated content.  This content can be broadly categorized into Virtual Reality, Mixed Reality, and Augmented Reality.

Virtual Reality is an established learning technology, however it can be a large investment in time and money.  VR does has many practical applications, and is worth doing in particularly situations where cost and safety are concerns.  For example investing resources in developing a VR for training an airline ground crew to service an airplane. Prior to VR an airline might have to remove a plane from service for crew training, in addition, using an airplane for training could prove costly if a training accident occurred.  In this example a fully immersive virtual reality learning experience may be worth doing.

Augmented Reality is an emerging technology and is a relatively accessible.   Augmented reality overlays computer generated content over a live image. For example the yellow First Down line on an football television broadcast or the strike zone box on a baseball broadcast.  Educators can experiment with an augmented reality tool called Zappar (first month free).  With the Zappar app, students can waive a mobile tablet or phone over an instructor setup image, illustration or text and have a video, audio, image, or web link pop up.  Static paper is a thing of the past, Zappar can bring them to life and it is relatively easy to do.   We recently shared it at Tech It Out Day 2018, if you are interested in Zappar and its applications for supporting student learning materials let us know.

Mixed Reality fills the space between computer generated world (VR) and real world with computer overlay (AR).  Like VR, Mixed Reality also requires a large investment of time and resources to develop. An example of MR is a theme park experience which mixes kinesthetic and sensory markers to enhance your experience.  For example watching a computer generated visual while physically being moved, or sprayed with water or sniffing scented air.

 

September 6, 2018
by Leanne Riseley
0 comments

Free Webinar: Inclusive PDFs by Design

 The National Center on Accessible Educational Materials

Tuesday, September 18, 2018
8:00 am – 9:00 am HST
Presenter: Luis Pérez, AEM Center

Designers of PDF documents take great pride in creativity and visual appeal. Did you know that PDFs can be accessible to readers with disabilities without sacrificing design? And when your materials are accessible, you’ll reach a wider and more diverse audience. Join this webinar to see how accessible PDF design is responsible, inclusive, and – yes – attractive.

Unable to attend the webinar?  No worries!  A recording will be available on the webinar’s Event Page approximately one week after the webinar.  An announcement will be sent when the recording is available.

REGISTER

10/17/18 update: The webinar recording is now available.

August 21, 2018
by Rachael Inake
0 comments

Tech It Out Day 2018

We kicked off the fall 2018 semester on Monday, August 13 with Tech It Out Day, a free half-day event to explore how technology can enhance teaching and learning in the classroom and online. There were four tracks of four, 30-minute hands-on sessions with about 60 faculty and staff participating. It was also a time to reconnect with each other after the summer break and enjoy some tasty snacks and manapua!

tech it out day audience

tech it out day facilitator showing audience phone

Sessions were facilitated by the EMC Educational Technologists and Leeward CC instructors. Topics included:

  • using Google Team Drive for collaboration
  • engaging students with reading resources
  • augmenting reality
  • promoting student engagement with Pear Deck
  • creating interactive content for knowledge checks using H5P
  • using Zoom for synchronous web conferencing to interact with students online
  • blogging
  • using Google Sites for weekly modules and committee websites
  • giving video feedback to students through screencasting
  • and more!

Visit the Tech It Out Day website for more information, resources, and photos.

Participants commented:

I participate in tech it out day to see how others are using technology in their classrooms trying to visit those presentations that I think might possibly be useful in my teaching.

I liked the fact that the sessions covered online feedback; in class activity interaction; creating videos for students and creating websites.

I really enjoyed the sessions. The length of the sessions were perfect to get just enough to decide whether you need more assistance. Most of the sessions had a hands-on component that was really helpful. Thank you!

Thank you for having Tech it Out day! It’s really amazing to find out what’s out there to make life easier for people.

Mahalo to our facilitators, participants, and the Leeward Staff Development Funds. We hope you join us at next year’s Tech It Out Day… maybe even as a facilitator! The call for proposals will be emailed in March 2019.

January 26, 2018
by Rachael Inake
0 comments

Leeward OER Spring 2018 Update

Here’s a quick re-cap on what’s happening with Open Educational Resources (OER) at Leeward CC.

Open Textbook Network

The Open Textbook Network (OTN) is an alliance of over 600 higher education institutions promoting access, affordability, and student success through the use of open textbooks. OTN maintains the Open Textbook Library, a collection of 453 peer-reviewed open textbooks. The UHCC system recently joined this growing community of open education advocates. Our membership allows UHCC OER advocates to participate in discussions with regional and national leaders, share best practices with other members, and tap into the collective expertise of the network. A highlight this year is an upcoming visit by two presenters from OTN coinciding with HSSI, March 28-29. A presentation is planned for Day 1 and a train-the-trainer workshop on Day 2. The all-day workshop at Honolulu CC is for individuals who will return to their home campuses as open textbook advocates and provide faculty with training opportunities. We are excited to participate in this network and share our successes with colleagues around the U.S.

Spring 2018 Textbook Cost: $0

Textbook Cost $0

Preliminary, we now have 273 sections at Leeward that are “textbook cost: $0” leading to a savings of $459,826 and a total savings to-date of $2,087,575. “Textbook cost: $0” “is a designation for a class that does not require students to purchase any course materials out-of-pocket. Classes may use a variety of Open Educational Resources (OERs), online resources, library resources, and faculty-authored materials to replace commercially-produced textbooks” (Go Open, Go Free).

“Go Open, Go Free Using OER” Spring 2018 Workshop

Go Open, Go Free Using OER

Are you interested in OER or going OER? Register today for the upcoming workshop series from February 13 to March 20 at 1:00 PM -2:30 PM. In this six-week workshop series, participants will learn about no-cost and Open Educational Resources (OER) which have the potential to replace costly commercial textbooks and other course materials.

Workshop Objectives:

  1. Articulating the value of OER in higher education
  2. Defining OER
  3. Distinguishing between openly licensed, public domain, and copyrighted materials
  4. Finding OER in your subject area
  5. Evaluating OER
  6. Understanding the differences in Creative Commons license types
  7. Combining different types of Creative Commons licensed materials
  8. Adding a Creative Commons license to your own work
  9. Giving proper attributions to OER

October 23, 2017
by Brent Hirata
0 comments

Side-by-Side Comparison of Classroom Video Capture Devices

As a follow up to my earlier post on Swivl C5 Iʻve captured a real world comparison of a Swivl C5 a stationary iPad and a stationary video camera for capturing teaching. The following excerpts came from a training session I facilitated on Nearpod engagement tool. Each device recorded simultaneously and are presented without enhancements to video or audio. The three devices and setups that I used to record content for this comparison were:

  1. Swivl C5 auto-tracker with iPad (1280×720)
  2. Stationary iPad (640×480)
  3. Stationary Camera (1920×1080)

“Clip 3 Observations” (2:25)

This clip features instructor movement through class space, student questions and commentary. Swivl wins for audio quality (Video 1 vs. Video 3), video quality and composition. Statonary iPad is definitely not the way to go since it canʻt  follow the instructor (Video 2).

Video 1: Swivl Auto-tracker 😊

  • Auto-tracker camera follows instructor.
  • Student and instructor voice quality using Swivl wireless microphones.

Video 2: iPad Stationary 😩

  • Instructor off screen, camera faces wall, no visible action occurring in video, viewer loose interest.
  • Audio soft as instructor moves away from device.  No additional microphones.

Video 3: Video Cam Stationary 😐

  • Instructor off screen for a portion of the video. The left half of the room did not fit in the wide shot.
  • Audio sounds hollow.  Picks up ambient room buzz.

Video Playlist: Compare the three recordings below.

“Clip 4 Observations” (1:25)

Traditional lecture position with no movement.  Swivl wins for audio quality and for video quality because it is a closer shot of the instructor (Video 1 vs. Video 3).

Video 1: Swivl Auto-tracker 😊

  •  Student and instructor voice quality using Swivl wireless microphones.

Video 2: iPad Stationary 😐

  • Video quality is a little fuzzy, but that is primarily because of the iPads resolution.
  • Audio a little soft.

Video 3: Video Cam Stationary 😐

  • Audio sounds hollow.  Picks up ambient room buzz.

Video Playlist: Compare the three recordings below.

“Clip 5 Observations” (2:45)

Instructor starts off in the front of the room and moves to the back of the room.  In the beginning of the video the Swivl did take a few seconds to keep up but overall got the job done. Swivl wins for audio and video quality and composition.

Video 1: Swivl Auto-tracker 😐

  • Auto-tracker camera follows instructor.  As I was walking my body shielded the lanyard from view which resulted in the Swivl taking a few seconds to find me.
  • As I was engaging with the students I was able to ask questions and receive answers. Student and instructor voice quality using Swivl wireless microphones.

Video 2: iPad Stationary 😩

  • Instructor off screen, no visible action occurring in video, viewers will loose interest.
  • Audio soft as instructor moves away from device.  No additional microphones.

Video 3: Video Cam Stationary 😐

  •  Instructor off screen for a portion of the video. The left half of the room did not fit in the wide shot.
  • Audio sounds hollow.  Picks up ambient room buzz.

Video Playlist: Compare the three recordings below.

“Clip 6 Observations” (00:45)

This shot features the audio of student helping student while instructor converses with other students. With the Swivl student microphones you can notice the difference (Check out Video 1 vs. Video 2).  While Video 3 picks up student conversation the video composition is poor.

Video 1: Swivl Auto-tracker 😊

  • Student helping student audio captured with Swivl wireless student microphones.

Video 2: iPad Stationary 😩

  • Instructor off screen, no visible action occurring in video, viewers will loose interest.
  • Audio soft as because of distance from device.  No additional microphones.

Video 3: Video Cam Stationary 😐

  • The left half of the room did not fit in the wide shot.  Instructor interactions with other students in the room not captured.
  • Audio picks up student to student conversation but also picks up ambient room buzz.

Video Playlist: Compare the three recordings below.

“Clip 7 Observations” (4:43)

This clip features instructor movement from the front of the room to the student area.  Swivl wireless microphones for instructor and student does a good job of capturing instructor and student audio.  Stationary cameras (Video 2 and Video 3) failed to capture full class in the view that Swivl (Video 1) did.

Video 1: Swivl Auto-tracker 😊

  • Auto-tracker camera follows instructor.  As I was walking my body shielded the lanyard from view which resulted in the Swivl taking a few seconds to find me.
  • Student and facilitator voice quality using Swivl wireless microphones.

Video 2: iPad Stationary 😩

  • Instructor off screen, no visible action occurring in video, viewers will loose interest.
  • Audio soft as instructor moves away from device.  No additional microphones.

Video 3: Video Cam Stationary 😩

  • The left half of the room did not fit in the wide shot.  Instructor interactions with other students in the room not captured.
  • Audio sounds hollow.  Picks up ambient room buzz.

Video Playlist: Compare the three recordings below.

Summary

I hope that these side by side comparisons helped to illustrate the benefits for using the right device in your workflow to capture your instruction. I found the stationary iPad was severely limited once the instructor move away from the front of the room.  In addition the audio was soft because there was only one microphone.  Alternatively I found the stationary video camera in the back of the room captured half of the room and the audio was noisy due to ambient noise.  I found the Swivl C5 successfully captured the session.  There were a few instances where body movement blocked the Swivl from seeing the transmitter, but that can be fixed with proper technique.  I appreciated that Swivl C5 balances close up video shots and entire classroom shots. In addition the audio with student and instructor wireless microphones was cleaner than the other cameras captured.

If you’re a Leeward CC faculty, lecturer, administrator, or staff member and are interested in using the Swivl C5, contact me, Brent Hirata, at bhirata@hawaii.edu.

September 18, 2017
by Brent Hirata
0 comments

A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words

Have you ever stared into the engine compartment of a vehicle and been fascinated by all those moving parts?   Now imagine being a student in the automotive field, building your professional knowledge of parts and terminology is an important first step toward being successful.  This week we are featuring Nolan Miyahara an Instructor of Automotive Technology  here at Leeward Community College who recently conducted a Nearpod activity with his students to review and reinforce their learning of basic parts.
 Nearpod Annotated Picture
Activity
Nearpod is a formative assessment tool for delivering engaging presentations. It does require an internet connection but does not require a Smart Classroom projector.  Each student sees the presentation on their own mobile device (phone, table, laptop) and the pace is controlled by the instructor.  Students’ interactions can be shared with their peers for class discussion or captured for easy reporting.  Nolan’s activity used Nearpod’s draw slide feature to allow individual students to match terms with images (engine parts) he provided.  Nolan thought the Nearpod draw activity worked well, he also took time to build a few Nearpod slides following a more traditional yes/no format.
Strengths and Weaknesses
Following the activity Nolan thought “the variety of ways you can put up questions and how the students can answer in different ways” was a strength.   Student feedback seemed to infer that students “didn’t feel challenged because there was no timer”, a problem which can be addressed in the future by simply having the instructor implement a time limit for each slide.
In Summary
Overall Nolan felt the Nearpod review activity went well based on learning and engagement.  When asked for tips or advice for other instructors interested in using Nearpod, Nolan said “I would recommend it.”
If you are interested in learning more about Nearpod and how a Nearpod lesson can be integrated into your rotation of activities please contact Brent Hirata (bhirata@hawaii.edu) at the Educational Media Center.
Skip to toolbar