Learning with Technology

for Teaching

October 1, 2018
by Educational Media Center
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Multiple Realities

Infographic XR VR MR AR

Infographic XR VR MR AR

Have you noticed the subtle expansion in extended reality or XR in our daily lives?   Extended Reality or XR is the umbrella concept that covers a range of modified or extended experiences that take true reality and either recreate or overlay computer generated content.  This content can be broadly categorized into Virtual Reality, Mixed Reality, and Augmented Reality.

Virtual Reality is an established learning technology, however it can be a large investment in time and money.  VR does has many practical applications, and is worth doing in particularly situations where cost and safety are concerns.  For example investing resources in developing a VR for training an airline ground crew to service an airplane. Prior to VR an airline might have to remove a plane from service for crew training, in addition, using an airplane for training could prove costly if a training accident occurred.  In this example a fully immersive virtual reality learning experience may be worth doing.

Augmented Reality is an emerging technology and is a relatively accessible.   Augmented reality overlays computer generated content over a live image. For example the yellow First Down line on an football television broadcast or the strike zone box on a baseball broadcast.  Educators can experiment with an augmented reality tool called Zappar (first month free).  With the Zappar app, students can waive a mobile tablet or phone over an instructor setup image, illustration or text and have a video, audio, image, or web link pop up.  Static paper is a thing of the past, Zappar can bring them to life and it is relatively easy to do.   We recently shared it at Tech It Out Day 2018, if you are interested in Zappar and its applications for supporting student learning materials let us know.

Mixed Reality fills the space between computer generated world (VR) and real world with computer overlay (AR).  Like VR, Mixed Reality also requires a large investment of time and resources to develop. An example of MR is a theme park experience which mixes kinesthetic and sensory markers to enhance your experience.  For example watching a computer generated visual while physically being moved, or sprayed with water or sniffing scented air.

 

September 6, 2018
by Leanne Riseley
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Free Webinar: Inclusive PDFs by Design

 The National Center on Accessible Educational Materials

Tuesday, September 18, 2018
8:00 am – 9:00 am HST
Presenter: Luis Pérez, AEM Center

Designers of PDF documents take great pride in creativity and visual appeal. Did you know that PDFs can be accessible to readers with disabilities without sacrificing design? And when your materials are accessible, you’ll reach a wider and more diverse audience. Join this webinar to see how accessible PDF design is responsible, inclusive, and – yes – attractive.

Unable to attend the webinar?  No worries!  A recording will be available on the webinar’s Event Page approximately one week after the webinar.  An announcement will be sent when the recording is available.

REGISTER

10/17/18 update: The webinar recording is now available.

August 28, 2018
by Brent Hirata
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Capture your Teaching with Swivl

Simple and easy to use, our Swivl robotic tripod system is available for check out.  Faculty may borrow our Swivl kit (Swivl mount, iPad) to record themselves teaching.  Finished recordings can be saved or shared with others via Google Drive (no internet required to record).  This is a great tool if you are having trouble scheduling peers to sit in on your class for peer reviews.   The Swivl kit comes with an iPad for recording the video and wireless microphones to capture student questions and responses.  The Swivl base moves the iPad (camera) to always keep you in the frame as you move about the room teaching.   Check out our previous post illustrating the differences between a video camera, stationary iPad and iPad mounted on Swivl.   Please contact Brent (bhirata@hawaii.edu) in the Educational Media Center if you are interested in checking out Swivl.

August 21, 2018
by Rachael Inake
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Tech It Out Day 2018

We kicked off the fall 2018 semester on Monday, August 13 with Tech It Out Day, a free half-day event to explore how technology can enhance teaching and learning in the classroom and online. There were four tracks of four, 30-minute hands-on sessions with about 60 faculty and staff participating. It was also a time to reconnect with each other after the summer break and enjoy some tasty snacks and manapua!

tech it out day audience

tech it out day facilitator showing audience phone

Sessions were facilitated by the EMC Educational Technologists and Leeward CC instructors. Topics included:

  • using Google Team Drive for collaboration
  • engaging students with reading resources
  • augmenting reality
  • promoting student engagement with Pear Deck
  • creating interactive content for knowledge checks using H5P
  • using Zoom for synchronous web conferencing to interact with students online
  • blogging
  • using Google Sites for weekly modules and committee websites
  • giving video feedback to students through screencasting
  • and more!

Visit the Tech It Out Day website for more information, resources, and photos.

Participants commented:

I participate in tech it out day to see how others are using technology in their classrooms trying to visit those presentations that I think might possibly be useful in my teaching.

I liked the fact that the sessions covered online feedback; in class activity interaction; creating videos for students and creating websites.

I really enjoyed the sessions. The length of the sessions were perfect to get just enough to decide whether you need more assistance. Most of the sessions had a hands-on component that was really helpful. Thank you!

Thank you for having Tech it Out day! It’s really amazing to find out what’s out there to make life easier for people.

Mahalo to our facilitators, participants, and the Leeward Staff Development Funds. We hope you join us at next year’s Tech It Out Day… maybe even as a facilitator! The call for proposals will be emailed in March 2019.

January 26, 2018
by Rachael Inake
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Leeward OER Spring 2018 Update

Here’s a quick re-cap on what’s happening with Open Educational Resources (OER) at Leeward CC.

Open Textbook Network

The Open Textbook Network (OTN) is an alliance of over 600 higher education institutions promoting access, affordability, and student success through the use of open textbooks. OTN maintains the Open Textbook Library, a collection of 453 peer-reviewed open textbooks. The UHCC system recently joined this growing community of open education advocates. Our membership allows UHCC OER advocates to participate in discussions with regional and national leaders, share best practices with other members, and tap into the collective expertise of the network. A highlight this year is an upcoming visit by two presenters from OTN coinciding with HSSI, March 28-29. A presentation is planned for Day 1 and a train-the-trainer workshop on Day 2. The all-day workshop at Honolulu CC is for individuals who will return to their home campuses as open textbook advocates and provide faculty with training opportunities. We are excited to participate in this network and share our successes with colleagues around the U.S.

Spring 2018 Textbook Cost: $0

Textbook Cost $0

Preliminary, we now have 273 sections at Leeward that are “textbook cost: $0” leading to a savings of $459,826 and a total savings to-date of $2,087,575. “Textbook cost: $0” “is a designation for a class that does not require students to purchase any course materials out-of-pocket. Classes may use a variety of Open Educational Resources (OERs), online resources, library resources, and faculty-authored materials to replace commercially-produced textbooks” (Go Open, Go Free).

“Go Open, Go Free Using OER” Spring 2018 Workshop

Go Open, Go Free Using OER

Are you interested in OER or going OER? Register today for the upcoming workshop series from February 13 to March 20 at 1:00 PM -2:30 PM. In this six-week workshop series, participants will learn about no-cost and Open Educational Resources (OER) which have the potential to replace costly commercial textbooks and other course materials.

Workshop Objectives:

  1. Articulating the value of OER in higher education
  2. Defining OER
  3. Distinguishing between openly licensed, public domain, and copyrighted materials
  4. Finding OER in your subject area
  5. Evaluating OER
  6. Understanding the differences in Creative Commons license types
  7. Combining different types of Creative Commons licensed materials
  8. Adding a Creative Commons license to your own work
  9. Giving proper attributions to OER

October 23, 2017
by Brent Hirata
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Side-by-Side Comparison of Classroom Video Capture Devices

As a follow up to my earlier post on Swivl C5 Iʻve captured a real world comparison of a Swivl C5 a stationary iPad and a stationary video camera for capturing teaching. The following excerpts came from a training session I facilitated on Nearpod engagement tool. Each device recorded simultaneously and are presented without enhancements to video or audio. The three devices and setups that I used to record content for this comparison were:

  1. Swivl C5 auto-tracker with iPad (1280×720)
  2. Stationary iPad (640×480)
  3. Stationary Camera (1920×1080)

“Clip 3 Observations” (2:25)

This clip features instructor movement through class space, student questions and commentary. Swivl wins for audio quality (Video 1 vs. Video 3), video quality and composition. Statonary iPad is definitely not the way to go since it canʻt  follow the instructor (Video 2).

Video 1: Swivl Auto-tracker 😊

  • Auto-tracker camera follows instructor.
  • Student and instructor voice quality using Swivl wireless microphones.

Video 2: iPad Stationary 😩

  • Instructor off screen, camera faces wall, no visible action occurring in video, viewer loose interest.
  • Audio soft as instructor moves away from device.  No additional microphones.

Video 3: Video Cam Stationary 😐

  • Instructor off screen for a portion of the video. The left half of the room did not fit in the wide shot.
  • Audio sounds hollow.  Picks up ambient room buzz.

Video Playlist: Compare the three recordings below.

“Clip 4 Observations” (1:25)

Traditional lecture position with no movement.  Swivl wins for audio quality and for video quality because it is a closer shot of the instructor (Video 1 vs. Video 3).

Video 1: Swivl Auto-tracker 😊

  •  Student and instructor voice quality using Swivl wireless microphones.

Video 2: iPad Stationary 😐

  • Video quality is a little fuzzy, but that is primarily because of the iPads resolution.
  • Audio a little soft.

Video 3: Video Cam Stationary 😐

  • Audio sounds hollow.  Picks up ambient room buzz.

Video Playlist: Compare the three recordings below.

“Clip 5 Observations” (2:45)

Instructor starts off in the front of the room and moves to the back of the room.  In the beginning of the video the Swivl did take a few seconds to keep up but overall got the job done. Swivl wins for audio and video quality and composition.

Video 1: Swivl Auto-tracker 😐

  • Auto-tracker camera follows instructor.  As I was walking my body shielded the lanyard from view which resulted in the Swivl taking a few seconds to find me.
  • As I was engaging with the students I was able to ask questions and receive answers. Student and instructor voice quality using Swivl wireless microphones.

Video 2: iPad Stationary 😩

  • Instructor off screen, no visible action occurring in video, viewers will loose interest.
  • Audio soft as instructor moves away from device.  No additional microphones.

Video 3: Video Cam Stationary 😐

  •  Instructor off screen for a portion of the video. The left half of the room did not fit in the wide shot.
  • Audio sounds hollow.  Picks up ambient room buzz.

Video Playlist: Compare the three recordings below.

“Clip 6 Observations” (00:45)

This shot features the audio of student helping student while instructor converses with other students. With the Swivl student microphones you can notice the difference (Check out Video 1 vs. Video 2).  While Video 3 picks up student conversation the video composition is poor.

Video 1: Swivl Auto-tracker 😊

  • Student helping student audio captured with Swivl wireless student microphones.

Video 2: iPad Stationary 😩

  • Instructor off screen, no visible action occurring in video, viewers will loose interest.
  • Audio soft as because of distance from device.  No additional microphones.

Video 3: Video Cam Stationary 😐

  • The left half of the room did not fit in the wide shot.  Instructor interactions with other students in the room not captured.
  • Audio picks up student to student conversation but also picks up ambient room buzz.

Video Playlist: Compare the three recordings below.

“Clip 7 Observations” (4:43)

This clip features instructor movement from the front of the room to the student area.  Swivl wireless microphones for instructor and student does a good job of capturing instructor and student audio.  Stationary cameras (Video 2 and Video 3) failed to capture full class in the view that Swivl (Video 1) did.

Video 1: Swivl Auto-tracker 😊

  • Auto-tracker camera follows instructor.  As I was walking my body shielded the lanyard from view which resulted in the Swivl taking a few seconds to find me.
  • Student and facilitator voice quality using Swivl wireless microphones.

Video 2: iPad Stationary 😩

  • Instructor off screen, no visible action occurring in video, viewers will loose interest.
  • Audio soft as instructor moves away from device.  No additional microphones.

Video 3: Video Cam Stationary 😩

  • The left half of the room did not fit in the wide shot.  Instructor interactions with other students in the room not captured.
  • Audio sounds hollow.  Picks up ambient room buzz.

Video Playlist: Compare the three recordings below.

Summary

I hope that these side by side comparisons helped to illustrate the benefits for using the right device in your workflow to capture your instruction. I found the stationary iPad was severely limited once the instructor move away from the front of the room.  In addition the audio was soft because there was only one microphone.  Alternatively I found the stationary video camera in the back of the room captured half of the room and the audio was noisy due to ambient noise.  I found the Swivl C5 successfully captured the session.  There were a few instances where body movement blocked the Swivl from seeing the transmitter, but that can be fixed with proper technique.  I appreciated that Swivl C5 balances close up video shots and entire classroom shots. In addition the audio with student and instructor wireless microphones was cleaner than the other cameras captured.

If you’re a Leeward CC faculty, lecturer, administrator, or staff member and are interested in using the Swivl C5, contact me, Brent Hirata, at bhirata@hawaii.edu.

September 18, 2017
by Brent Hirata
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A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words

Have you ever stared into the engine compartment of a vehicle and been fascinated by all those moving parts?   Now imagine being a student in the automotive field, building your professional knowledge of parts and terminology is an important first step toward being successful.  This week we are featuring Nolan Miyahara an Instructor of Automotive Technology  here at Leeward Community College who recently conducted a Nearpod activity with his students to review and reinforce their learning of basic parts.
 Nearpod Annotated Picture
Activity
Nearpod is a formative assessment tool for delivering engaging presentations. It does require an internet connection but does not require a Smart Classroom projector.  Each student sees the presentation on their own mobile device (phone, table, laptop) and the pace is controlled by the instructor.  Students’ interactions can be shared with their peers for class discussion or captured for easy reporting.  Nolan’s activity used Nearpod’s draw slide feature to allow individual students to match terms with images (engine parts) he provided.  Nolan thought the Nearpod draw activity worked well, he also took time to build a few Nearpod slides following a more traditional yes/no format.
Strengths and Weaknesses
Following the activity Nolan thought “the variety of ways you can put up questions and how the students can answer in different ways” was a strength.   Student feedback seemed to infer that students “didn’t feel challenged because there was no timer”, a problem which can be addressed in the future by simply having the instructor implement a time limit for each slide.
In Summary
Overall Nolan felt the Nearpod review activity went well based on learning and engagement.  When asked for tips or advice for other instructors interested in using Nearpod, Nolan said “I would recommend it.”
If you are interested in learning more about Nearpod and how a Nearpod lesson can be integrated into your rotation of activities please contact Brent Hirata (bhirata@hawaii.edu) at the Educational Media Center.

September 11, 2017
by Rachael Inake
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EMC’s Chromebook COW for Classroom Use

The following is a guest blog post by Junie Hayashi, Librarian, at Leeward CC.

Ever wanted to do an activity with your students that required everyone to have a computer (laptop, tablet, or smartphone) but didn’t have a computer classroom? Reserve the EMC’s Chromebook COW (classroom on wheels) that includes a set of 20 lightweight Chromebooks. The Chromebooks use Google Chrome browser for internet browsing and have both keyboards and touch screens. Although you cannot download software onto the Chromebooks, numerous apps are available from the Google Chrome Web Store.

chromebook cart

I provide library instruction sessions for various classes including English, Speech, Psychology, and Women’s Studies. Using the Chromebook COW, I am able to provide sessions in the classroom instead of having the class come to the Library. This is especially helpful when we have multiple sessions during the same class period. In addition, my sessions often include group work which is very difficult to do  in a traditional computer lab setting. Using the Chromebooks makes it easy for students to work together in a meaningful way. The COW is much smaller and easier to navigate than the previous one. Students have even told me that the Chromebooks were “cool” and way better than other laptops. Definitely check out the EMC’s new Chromebooks!

chromebook user

Looking to reserve/checkout the Chromebook COW? Visit the Intec window at LC 116 or request online. (Note: First time using the request form? Please contact the Help Desk so an account can be created for future reservations.)

August 21, 2017
by Rachael Inake
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Highlights from Tech It Out Day 2017

We had another great Tech It Out Day on August 14, 2017. Thank you for sharing part of your day with us in exploring how technology can enhance teaching and learning in the classroom and online. Sessions were a short 30 minutes to keep things light and fun, and spark interest and curiosity. Participants were able to “test drive” different tools and apps and see how fellow colleagues are using technology in their classes. We had sessions for formative assessment apps to make learning interactive, tools and ideas for communication and building community in your classroom, and even 3D printing.

Special thanks to the EMC and Library staff for facilitating sessions and helping at the event and the Leeward Staff Development Funds who provided funding for food.

tech it out day photo two participants

tech it out day kahoot photo

View all photos here.

Participants commented:

This was the most accessible and most useful Tech It Out Day ever.

I always enjoy Tech It Out [Day] and learning from colleagues’ ideas and experience.

I like the small group learning environment and all the presenters were enthusiastic and encouraging. Another fun morning, thank you.

tech it out day photo group

tech it out day photo of library staff

If you would like to follow-up your learning for more, please check the website for additional resources and the presenter’s contact information. See you next year!

December 14, 2016
by Leanne Riseley
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What Students Are Saying about Using OER

Over the past three semesters, several instructors who taught using no-cost or Open Educational Resources sent a survey to their students to see how these resources affected their learning. The results below are a summary of the findings.

Demographics

There were a total of 530 students who took the survey (97% Leeward and 3% Kapiolani students) in 16 different courses.

Have you saved money with your instructor adopting no-cost or OER resources?It wasn’t a surprise that 94% of survey responses showed they feel they saved money by using no-cost or OER resources.

Comments from students included:

“I was thrilled that Professor X was using OER resources. Money is very tight as it is for most college students, especially non-traditional students with families.”

“…I didn’t have to buy any books and we learned just as much as other classes where you had to buy a book maybe even better. I wish most classes were like this so we can save paper books money time.”

“Yes, absolutely! I live in Hawaii by myself, and as you know with the high cost of living here, saving every little bit helps. I am on financial aid, and scholarships. Just this simple act on the professors, as well as the colleges part, I was able to save money and use it in other places in regards to my education.”

 

 

Access and Use

The majority (97%) of the materials were accessed through the Learning Management System (Laulima). 48% of the students identified general online resources as a way they accessed their materials. 37% of students used Library online resources. It was interesting to note that 28% said they rely on print by the Instructor and 20% print it themselves.

92% of the students reported having access to a device and the Internet to access the resources. 90% found the resources easy to navigate, download, or print.  Approximately the same number of students reported using the resources frequently throughout the semester.

These access and use statistics have remained consistent for the last three semesters.

Quality

87% felt the quality of the no-cost resources were just as good as a traditional textbook.

Student’s Opinions

80% felt they did better in the course because they had access to the resources from the first day of class.

88% felt the instructor showed concern for them because they chose no-cost resources.

86% would be more likely to register for a “Textbook Cost: $0” course vs. one without a label. 97% would take another course that used “Textbook Cost: $0” resources.

95% reported no challenges with the no-cost resources.

It is interesting to note that in all areas, there was a small percentage of students (about 6%) who did not hold the same opinions regarding access, quality, and lack of challenges using no-cost resources.

Some of the General comments

“This is a much better alternative to traditional textbooks. It saves money, and much more useful and easy to access than printed textbooks. I hope all classes will convert to this method in the future.” – Spring 2016 student

“I did better in this class than I did in my other classes. All texts needed were easy to access and understand. I honestly don’t feel I would have been able to afford another book and I am very thankful that my professor chose to use no-cost resources.” – Fall 2015  student

“You can’t go wrong with downloadable textbooks. You don’t have to carry bulky books and you are using your computer to do assignments anyway! It’s all in one place.” – Fall 2015 student

“Textbook Cost $0 saves me money, time, and providing me with the education needed to succeed. It saved me the stress by going down to the crowded (fixed spelling “crowed”) book store to buy a expensive book. I really appreciate our professor X (removed name) for her concerns for us student and this program.” – Fall 2015 student

“I would say that just because there is no textbook doesn’t mean there is no work. You have to work just as hard. Also the resources are just notes of your teachers so please do NOT plagiarize! Have respect for the teachers who give you this no cost textbook option because it shows that they care, that they understand the struggles of having to pay for expensive textbooks!” – Fall 2015 student

“It saves a lot of money and isn’t a hassle at all!” – Fall 2015 student

“The quality of learning from a course that uses OER resources is just as good as when you have to spend hundreds of dollars on a textbook or two.” – Fall 2015 student

“I was happy and very thankful when she told us that we didn’t need to buy a textbook. This was the first time and I hope it’s not the last time. I wish more professors could do this for their students.” – Fall 2015 student

“…it is a great way to save money while not compromising quality of education. In some ways, like having access to material from anywhere at anytime, it improves the quality of learning.” – Fall 2016 student

“Definitely a benefit in taking this class. You don’t have to carry your book with you. You can do your assignments as long as you have Internet access.” – Fall 2016 student

“Cost friendly and easy on the back. No books to carry!” – Fall 2016 student

“This wouldn’t work for all classes. Some classes use the textbook a lot and it makes it easier to have a textbook to read and write on.” – Fall 2016 student

“I loved not having a textbook. We got to have SO many different readings, insights and resources then if we got it all from the same place (a textbook). Also, being a college student and not having tons of money, I really appreciated not having to buy a textbook!” – Fall 2016 student


Thank you to Kelsie Aguilera, Jayne Bopp, Ross Higa, Michelle Igarashi, Ann Inoshita, Gregg Longanecker, Lani Uyeno, Jonathan Wong, and Susan Wood for helping to provide this student data.

For more information, please visit the Open Educational Resources Fellowship Program.

 

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