Learning with Technology

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November 8, 2018
by Leanne Riseley
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What We Have Learned About CES – Part 4

CES was released on Monday, October 29, 2018. Together, we are learning about this new system. Some wonderful hints and questions have already been shared. By communicating them to you, I hope it will help you as you set up your CES for your class(es).


This question was submitted by Albert Chan

Albert ChanI have already constructed my survey with relevant questions and it is ready to go. Do I need to do anything else before it is released to the students? After they receive the notification, may I remind them to take the survey?

After you created your survey, you are ready to go. You do not have to do anything else to release it to students. A common mistake is to only enter the questions into the question pool. Be sure to add the questions to each of your surveys. It is a two-step process: 1. add questions to question pool, 2. select questions for your survey.

Students will receive automated messages from the UH system to take the surveys. Students will be taking the surveys from Nov 19, 2018 – Dec 6, 2018. I like your idea to remind your students (in class and by email) to take the survey.


This question was submitted by Michael Oishi.

Michael Oishi headshotWill CES provide instructors a running total/percentage of how many students have completed a given survey, similar to eCAFE?

Once the students start taking the survey, if you login to CES you will see updated statistics for each of your classes. It will look similar to this screen. Each CRN has the number of students enrolled, completed, and opted-out.

Screenshot showing two CRNs with the number of students enrolled, number of students completed, and number of students opted out.


This question was submitted by Tina Lee.

Tina Lee HeadshotWhen eCafe first came out I thought I remembered a bunch of questions being available that we could choose from and add into our evaluation. Is there a question bank that we could refer to in case we wanted to revise our evaluation questions?

Yes, the questions from Leeward’s paper surveys were collected by Faculty Senate. They can be found on our CES website (scroll to the bottom for links to questions by Division). Additionally, all 300+ old eCafe questions have been archived and are available from within eCafe under Help –> View Retired eCafe Questions.

Help menu - View Retired eCafe Questions


This question was submitted by Erika Molyneux.

Erika MolyneuxI accidentally copied a few questions into my question bank more than once. I made the duplicates inactive, but is there a way to actually delete them from the question bank?

No, sorry, you can’t delete them. You can only make them inactivate. For future reference, once a question has been used in a completed survey, for statistical and historical reasons, the question cannot be changed.

 


Please continue to share your helpful hints with me and I will share it out.
Email Leanne Riseley: leannech@hawaii.edu

More information at Leeward CC CES site.

November 7, 2018
by Leanne Riseley
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What We Have Learned About CES – Part 3

CES was released on Monday, October 29, 2018. Together, we are learning about this new system. Some wonderful hints and questions have already been shared. By communicating them to you, I hope it will help you as you set up your CES for your class(es).


This question was submitted by Kermit the Frog (aka Dottie Sunio)

Kermit the Frog

Can you tell me how I can copy all of the questions from eCafe to CES?  It appears that I have to do it one question at a time.

Yes, you are correct. If you have used eCafe in the past, you will have to copy/paste each question one at a time into CES. Your previous eCafe evaluations are archived and can be accessed by logging into CES, then clicking My Surveys –> My Survey Results. Select one of your past surveys and copy/paste your questions into the CES  question pool.

CES screenshot showing My Surveys menu with My Survey Results

You only have to copy your questions into CES this semester. In future semesters your questions/surveys will be in CES and it will be much quicker to create your surveys.


Please continue to share your helpful hints with me and I will share it out.
Email Leanne Riseley: leannech@hawaii.edu

More information at Leeward CC CES site.

November 6, 2018
by Leanne Riseley
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What We Have Learned About CES – Part 2

CES was released on Monday, October 29, 2018. Together, we are learning about this new system. Some wonderful hints and questions have already been shared. By communicating them to you, I hope it will help you as you setup your CES for your class(es).


This question was submitted by John Signor
John Signor headshot

May I still use the traditional hard copy evaluation forms this semester and switch to CES next semester?

Yes, you may still use hard copy evaluation forms this semester. Please be aware that your students will be emailed a link to a CES evaluation for your course with a single question (How would you rate the overall quality of this course?).


This is a general question about Early College classes.

Can I use CES for my Early College class?

Absolutely. Early College classes all have CRNs in Banner. Therefore, you may create a CES evaluation for your Early College class just as you would for any other Leeward CC class.


Please continue to share your helpful hints with me and I will share it out.
Email Leanne Riseley: leannech@hawaii.edu

More information at Leeward CC CES site.

November 1, 2018
by Leanne Riseley
0 comments

What We Have Learned About CES

CES was released on Monday, October 29, 2018. Together, we are learning about this new system. Some wonderful hints and questions have already been shared. By communicating them to you, I hope it will help you as you setup your CES for your class(es).


This was helpful hint was submitted by Michael Oishi
Michael Oishi headshot
The order of the questions in the question bank is the order in which they appear in the survey.  

I have a slightly different set of questions for my DE courses than I do for my face-to-face class courses.  While several of the questions are similar, they are worded slightly differently. Since I am currently in the middle of a promotion cycle and have already created tables and graphs of my evaluation results, I would like to keep the order of CES questions the same as in my previous evaluations.  The problem, however, is that when new questions are added to the bank, they are randomly added to and organized in the bank. To separate the questions for my face-to-face questions classes from my DE classes, I reorganized the questions in my question bank. I put all the questions for my face-to-face classes first, followed by the questions for my DE classes.

A hack for instructors who also have different sets of questions for different types of courses they teach is to first add ALL questions for all their surveys into the question bank.  Then go back and reorder the questions–perhaps by listing questions for face-to-face classes first, then all questions for DE courses.  That way, when one has to select the questions for a survey from the bank, all the questions are generally separated and organized in the order one wants.

Like many things, CES is a bit time-consuming in the beginning, but thankfully much easier and faster once things are set up.


This question was submitted by Donna MatsumotoDonna Matsumoto headshot

My evaluation for my accelerated ENG 200 class is Turned Off. Will I be able to use the CES for that class?  Here is a screenshot of what is in CES.

ENG 200 CES screenshot showing survey is turned off

Accelerated classes and other non-traditional classes have been set to end on 11/23/18. As the instructor, you should create your evaluation now. The evaluation will open to your students two weeks prior to the end of the course which will be 11/9/18. On that date, your survey will be turned on.


This was a helpful hint submitted by Kale’a Silva.

Kale'a Silva headshot

I feel like students rush through course evaluations if I give it to them at the end of class on the last day. So, what I plan to do with CES, is to give them the first 10 minutes of class to complete it while I step out. Then, I’ll resume class after they complete the evaluation. That way, I hope to get 100% participation and more meaningful responses if students have time and don’t feel rushed.

Note: CES is now mobile friendly and can be completed on a smartphone.


Please continue to share your helpful hints with me and I will share it out.
Email Leanne Riseley: leannech@hawaii.edu

More information at Leeward CC CES site.

October 22, 2018
by Leanne Riseley
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Sharing about Leeward OER Creation

The following post is written by Kelsie Aguilera, Leeward CC OER Creation Award Winner for 2018

Kelsie doing workLast semester, I was honored (and thrilled!) to receive the Leeward OER Creation Award (LOERCA). The goal of the LOERCA is to develop original OER materials where none exists or revise and remix existing OER with the addition of original content. I highly recommend applying for one of the many Leeward CC OER Award programs when the application periods open up again this coming spring semester; they are a great way to stay motivated and focused while transitioning to or developing OER.

I was graciously awarded the LOERCA in recognition of the following project I am working on: I, along with a team of three other managing editors, am developing a high-quality, open access biological anthropology textbook with 100% original written content that will be written and peer-reviewed by experts in the field—a project that will be the first of its kind and slated to be ready for use in Fall 2019. This edited book will be available free of charge under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 International License and housed on a website administered by the Society for Anthropology in Community Colleges (SACC), a professional anthropology organization that is part of the American Anthropological Association. In addition, this edited book can be made available on the University of Hawaii Open Educational Resources (OER) Repository and can be uploaded to UH Pressbooks. We finally decided on a title for our book, Explorations: An Open Invitation to Biological Anthropology.

The idea for this projected originated at the 2017 SACC conference in Boise, Idaho. On the bus to an archaeological site, I was chatting with an anthropologist from the California State University system about how great it would be if there were an OER textbook for biological anthropology. After the conference, when we got back home to our respective institutions, rather than just ignore our big idea, we decided to take action and make this textbook a reality. It is so exciting to be where we are now with the project. Over 25 expert authors have submitted chapters for our book, some of whom are big names in anthropology. And dozens more are supporting us as reviewers, illustrators, or designers. We are also fortunate that money will not be a problem for our project; we were quickly awarded the first grant we applied for, a $25,000 Innovation Grant from Minnesota State. If you decide to take on an OER project, no matter at what scale, you might be surprised at the tremendous support you will receive from Leeward CC and your larger communities. For example, receiving the LOERCA was unexpected but much appreciated. As a managing editor and author of this textbook, the Leeward CC OER Award program is supporting the countless hours I have put in to make this textbook for our students.

Although the cost savings to students is obvious, I want to mention another important contribution that our project will make. In the field of biological anthropology, there are less than a handful of “classic” introductory biological anthropology textbooks, some of which are now in their double-digit edition. While I certainly received a solid education as an undergraduate via one of these “classic” textbooks, in what ways are we limiting the voices that teach by privileging the voices of a select few? How many generations of anthropology students have been taught by the same voices with the same perspectives? Our textbook challenges this model by providing our students with a fresh multiplicity of voices, many of which have been traditionally underrepresented in biological anthropology textbooks. OER democratizes not only who gets to learn but also who gets to teach.  

Lastly, a note of encouragement for those who are considering transitioning to or developing OER. The first step is always the most daunting but you don’t have to take that first step alone! There are so many resources at Leeward to assist you along the way. Don’t be shy in reaching out to the Educational Media Center, Library, OER Campus Committee, or me!

May 3, 2018
by Rachael Inake
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Our Future is Open Access

A poem written by Ann Inoshita, Instructor of English at Leeward CC.

We must break the limits of the past
and construct new methods to collect and access
the contributions of all.

We must find answers at a faster rate
and unite our efforts to create breakthroughs.

We must participate in a free exchange of ideas
unbarred by bias.

We must embrace diversity as a strength
and realize that humility opens our minds to possibilities.

Problems have evolved and our minds must evolve
to support new ways to communicate and collect solutions.

Access to shared ideas is necessary
to learn and discover
beyond what we think is possible.

Ann Inoshita shares her poem, “Our Future is Open Access.”

poem

March 8, 2018
by Rachael Inake
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Kelsie’s OER Journey Continues

The following is a special guest blog post by: Kelsie Aguilera, Instructor of Anthropology, OER committee member, and graduate of the Go Open, Go Free Using OER workshop series.

Kelsie Aguilera profile

During the fall semester of 2016, I first shared with you my Open Educational Resources (OER) journey through a special guest blog post. I now wish to update you because some things have changed!

But, what has not changed is my support for OER and the global Open Education movement OER are a component of. There are so many barriers and challenges that our students face on their paths to academic and career success; purchasing an expensive textbook no longer has to be one of them. I now advocate for OER by serving on our campus OER committee along with serving on the Awareness subcommittee. Through my OER committee work, I am grateful for the many opportunities I have been given to share my experiences with OER to our campus and the community, such as being a guest speaker for the Go Open, Go Free Using OER track at the Pacific Region Learning Summit.

After taking the incredibly enriching Go Open, Go Free Using OER workshop series in 2016 and launching two of my courses as “$0 Textbook Cost” soon after, the response I have received from students has been overwhelmingly positive. I have received countless words of gratitude and thanks about going “$0 Textbook Cost” from students and no major critiques. In stark comparison, I used to receive countless complaints about the traditional textbook I used to assign. Furthermore, my success rates have increased since the switch. Although I cannot confidently attribute the increase to my adoption of free resources, many of which are OER, I like to believe that my efforts have made a positive impact.

Ultimately, I wanted to impart a note of encouragement to you. When I first heard about OER in 2013, I immediately became frustrated because I couldn’t find any suitable OER for anthropology. Thus, I abandoned the project until I took the Go Open, Go Free Using OER workshop series, which gave me the confidence and resources I need to take the leap. New OER materials are steadily being created and added to the movement. For example, an organization I am involved with, the Society for Anthropology in Community Colleges (SACC), recently released the first peer-reviewed, open access textbook for cultural anthropology called Perspectives: An open invitation to cultural anthropology.

Movements elicit change as the result of the participation of its supporters, so you can contribute to the OER movement too. I am doing my part; I am currently working with a dedicated group of SACC members to produce and edit an OER introductory biological anthropology textbook, which will be the first of its kind. If OER doesn’t work for you at the moment, don’t indefinitely rule it out. The movement keeps growing and evolving, and you can contribute to it, too, so that you can make OER work for you.

March 7, 2018
by Rachael Inake
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Why OER Was Appealing for Me

The following is a special guest blog post by: Lois-Lynn Deuel, Instructor of Psychology at Leeward CC.

Lois-Lynn Deuel profileMy path to using Open Educational Resources (OER) was not a hasty one. When I taught my first college course 25 years ago, I dutifully selected a well-known textbook for the spine of my course, promptly employed all of the publisher’s bells and whistles and creatively developed colorful PowerPoint presentations to organize my in-class lectures and facilitate student note-taking.

As my experience and expertise increased, a lot of things changed in my instructional style. I started incorporating more active learning activities, stopped using the “death by PowerPoint” approach and adopted a number of flipped classroom techniques. Most importantly, I began a slow drift away from using the textbook as the foundation in my courses.

Why was OER appealing to me?

  • Each semester, more and more students were not purchasing the textbook, purchasing a really old edition, using a “similar textbook,” or depending on the University of Google. I found the potential of increased access for ALL students to be very appealing.
  • In a similar vein, access from DAY ONE and continued access long after the course has ended (something that is not possible if students have rented or resold their textbooks) gives students a substantive and permanent resource.
  • I wasn’t making use of the entire textbook. Each year, I would “require” fewer pages to be read and leave some chapters as “optional reading.”
  • I was using an increased number of supplements to address shortcomings in the textbook, e.g., short YouTube videos that succinctly explained course concepts, popular literature with meaningful examples, clips from movies, TV shows and the news.
  • Even with new editions every few years—the information in textbooks was immediately out-of-date. I was making corrections “on the fly,” and sharing stories about cutting-edge research that was YEARS from making it into a textbook.

Last year, I participated in the OER Workshop offered through PRLS. My initial intention was to increase my technical knowledge and learn about more scholarly resources that I could systematically use to beef up the supplementary materials for my courses—like an “OER Lite” to accompany the textbook. As the week progressed, I decided that an OER text along with my existing supplementary materials might be an option. It would certainly save my students money.

Unfortunately, the next thing I came to realize during the PRLS week was that there were no existing OER texts for Developmental Psychology. If I wanted something better for my students (i.e., higher quality, up-to-date, more relevant, better explanations and examples, more efficient or concentrated learning), I was going to have to make it myself—an OER mash-up using hundreds of different resources.

The PRLS workshop on OER gave me the confidence to try (WARNING: Junie, Wayde, and Leanne are really sweet, helpful and persuasive!). So, I decided to take the plunge.

January 17, 2018
by Leanne Riseley
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Students as Authors through Open Pedagogy

It has been thrilling to see the Open Educational Resources (OER) Initiative takeoff at Leeward CC. Many instructors have successfully adopted and integrated OER into their classes. The initiative has reduced costs for students and increased student success. As we continue the push toward openness, we would like to encourage you to consider open pedagogy. While there is no single definition of open pedagogy, here is a definition:

Open pedagogy takes OER as a jumping-off point for rethinking the relationship between teachers, students, and knowledge. If teachers and students can now modify their textbooks and learning materials, we shift the student emphasis to contribution to knowledge as opposed to simple consumption of knowledge. Teachers and students become learners together, and “content” becomes a dynamic, always changing category with which we engage rather than a stable set of facts to be mastered. (DeRosa) Submitted by Heather M. Ross

It is always helpful to see examples from other instructors. Here one we would like to share.


Gloria NilesThe following is a guest blog post by Gloria Niles, PhD, Assistant Professor in Education, UH West Oahu.

After completing a 7-week OER training offered through Leeward Community College in Spring 2017, I had a renewed commitment to reducing or eliminating textbook cost for my courses by using instructional materials that are openly sourced.  I soon realized that projects I already assign could be used to teach my students to openly source and share their work with a global audience. Later, I realized this process had a term, which is  Open Pedagogy.

One assignment, in particular, has evolved over the past three years through Open Pedagogy. EDEE 324 is a required courses in the Elementary Education concentration for Education majors at UHWO. The ʻIke Ola Pono (Health Literacy) Digital Storybook Project is a assignment for Health, Physical Education and Movement (EDEE 324) at the University of Hawaiʻi-West Oʻahu (UHWO). I began this assignment in Fall 015, initially inspired by the Health Literacy Database at Miami University directed by Valerie Ubbes, Ph.D. My initial intention was to create an authentic assessment for teacher candidates (students) in an online course. As the project has evolved, my focus on Open Pedagogy has increased.

The objective of the ʻIke Ola Pono Digital Storybook project is for teacher candidates to develop a children’s story that incorporates aspects of Dr. Ubbes’ Habits of Health and Habits of Mind Model in a story that is culturally responsive to Hawaiian ways of knowing. In 2017, I incorporated the Hawaiʻi Department of Education’s Nā Hopena Aʻo (learning outcomes), adding a requirement that the story align with the Nā Hopena Aʻo as well as Hawaii Content and Performance Standards III for Health.

Beginning in 2017, teacher candidates were encouraged to add a Creative Commons license (which allows individuals to share their work, but retain copyright) to their storybook, and have their book included in the Mālama Honua Digital Storybook Series. In June 2017, the first titles in the series were shared publicly as part of the Mālama Honua Fair, celebrating the homecoming of the Hōkūleʻa. This event provide the authors the opportunity to showcase their work. As the teacher candidates shared their books with visitors who stopped by the UHWO exhibit space, it was heartwarming to observe the pride the authors had as children were reading their digital book on tablets and laptop computers. Parents and teachers were downloading the QR code to share the storybooks with their children and students.

Some teacher candidate are excited, and other are a bit intimidated at the start of the semester, when they learn they will be required to author and illustrate a children’s book. However, once they review the resources available through articles, videos, and websites, the trepidation turns to enthusiasm. Additionally, reviewing the titles in the Mālama Honua Series provides motivation and desire to see their story included in the series at the end of the course.

In addition to providing a collection of resources to support the process of writing childrenʻs literature and various media that can be used to illustrate their story, I scaffold this semester long project into steps, beginning with formation of peer review teams. During the first week of class, students join a peer review team of 4 to 5 students. The peer review teams each have a private discussion forum where they can share resources, and submit the stages of their project for feedback and review from their teammates. Providing feedback to their teammates also tends to strengthen their own project, and provides a support system.

The first submission is the ʻIke Ola Pono Digital Storybook Plan. Teacher candidates are provided with a planning template to scaffold the planning of their storybook, and identify how the story alignments with standards and outcomes.

The second step is the submission of the First Draft. This includes the manuscript and a storyboard for the conceptual design of the illustrations. Instructor and peer review feedback is provided. I also evaluate the manuscript for the readability level, using Readable.io. This tool provides feedback to determine if the manuscript is written at an appropriate reading level for the target age or grade level.

The third step is the submission of the Final Draft. This is the complete book in a digital format, with text and illustrations in the book format layout. Feedback is provided once again by peer review teammates as well as the instructor.

The published version is the final version of the storybook, submitted as the signature assignment. In the published version, the author is asked to add two lesson activities that can be used to extend learning opportunities, as well as the alignment to Health Education standards and the Nā Hopena Aʻo.

As the instructor, I serve as the editor for the series. As editor, my job is to ensure that illustrations that are not original artwork are correctly attributed, and overall professionalism of the published version. Not every ʻIke Ola Pono Digital Storybook submitted is represented in the series. However, as the series has grown to 23 titles, each semester the teacher candidate seem increasingly motivated to self-assess and produce a high quality project.

In order to continue the evolution of Open Pedagogy, ideas that I am considering are for teacher candidates to revise, remix, reuse titles in the Mālama Honua Digital Storybook Series. I am also planning Read-Aloud events where authors from the previous semester will read their book to children in local libraries, and in elementary school classrooms.

Key Takeaways

  • Model Use openly licensed instructional materials in your course (articles, textbooks, videos, podcasts, websites.)
  • Authentic assessment. Students are creating a meaningful product that will have an audience.
  • Scaffold Divide a semester-long project into incremental steps with formative feedback and reflection.
  • Self-assessment: Involve students in self-assessment of their work and classroom performance
  • Peer review. Use peer review for support and for improving student work.

My Ola Lunch by Rapunzel YaoFamily Kuleana by Macy ThoemmesKa Kumu Kawelo Papa by Justine MercadoHealthy Me, Healthy You by Kellie OshiroKa Nalu by Malia Rossetti

 

 

 

 

Sampling of screenshots above are from Mālama Honua Digital Storybook Series. Each storybook has been licensed by the student author under a Creative Commons license.

September 18, 2017
by Brent Hirata
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A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words

Have you ever stared into the engine compartment of a vehicle and been fascinated by all those moving parts?   Now imagine being a student in the automotive field, building your professional knowledge of parts and terminology is an important first step toward being successful.  This week we are featuring Nolan Miyahara an Instructor of Automotive Technology  here at Leeward Community College who recently conducted a Nearpod activity with his students to review and reinforce their learning of basic parts.
 Nearpod Annotated Picture
Activity
Nearpod is a formative assessment tool for delivering engaging presentations. It does require an internet connection but does not require a Smart Classroom projector.  Each student sees the presentation on their own mobile device (phone, table, laptop) and the pace is controlled by the instructor.  Students’ interactions can be shared with their peers for class discussion or captured for easy reporting.  Nolan’s activity used Nearpod’s draw slide feature to allow individual students to match terms with images (engine parts) he provided.  Nolan thought the Nearpod draw activity worked well, he also took time to build a few Nearpod slides following a more traditional yes/no format.
Strengths and Weaknesses
Following the activity Nolan thought “the variety of ways you can put up questions and how the students can answer in different ways” was a strength.   Student feedback seemed to infer that students “didn’t feel challenged because there was no timer”, a problem which can be addressed in the future by simply having the instructor implement a time limit for each slide.
In Summary
Overall Nolan felt the Nearpod review activity went well based on learning and engagement.  When asked for tips or advice for other instructors interested in using Nearpod, Nolan said “I would recommend it.”
If you are interested in learning more about Nearpod and how a Nearpod lesson can be integrated into your rotation of activities please contact Brent Hirata (bhirata@hawaii.edu) at the Educational Media Center.
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