Learning with Technology

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January 17, 2018
by Leanne Riseley
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Students as Authors through Open Pedagogy

It has been thrilling to see the Open Educational Resources (OER) Initiative takeoff at Leeward CC. Many instructors have successfully adopted and integrated OER into their classes. The initiative has reduced costs for students and increased student success. As we continue the push toward openness, we would like to encourage you to consider open pedagogy. While there is no single definition of open pedagogy, here is a definition:

Open pedagogy takes OER as a jumping-off point for rethinking the relationship between teachers, students, and knowledge. If teachers and students can now modify their textbooks and learning materials, we shift the student emphasis to contribution to knowledge as opposed to simple consumption of knowledge. Teachers and students become learners together, and “content” becomes a dynamic, always changing category with which we engage rather than a stable set of facts to be mastered. (DeRosa) Submitted by Heather M. Ross

It is always helpful to see examples from other instructors. Here one we would like to share.


Gloria NilesThe following is a guest blog post by Gloria Niles, PhD, Assistant Professor in Education, UH West Oahu.

After completing a 7-week OER training offered through Leeward Community College in Spring 2017, I had a renewed commitment to reducing or eliminating textbook cost for my courses by using instructional materials that are openly sourced.  I soon realized that projects I already assign could be used to teach my students to openly source and share their work with a global audience. Later, I realized this process had a term, which is  Open Pedagogy.

One assignment, in particular, has evolved over the past three years through Open Pedagogy. EDEE 324 is a required courses in the Elementary Education concentration for Education majors at UHWO. The ʻIke Ola Pono (Health Literacy) Digital Storybook Project is a assignment for Health, Physical Education and Movement (EDEE 324) at the University of Hawaiʻi-West Oʻahu (UHWO). I began this assignment in Fall 015, initially inspired by the Health Literacy Database at Miami University directed by Valerie Ubbes, Ph.D. My initial intention was to create an authentic assessment for teacher candidates (students) in an online course. As the project has evolved, my focus on Open Pedagogy has increased.

The objective of the ʻIke Ola Pono Digital Storybook project is for teacher candidates to develop a children’s story that incorporates aspects of Dr. Ubbes’ Habits of Health and Habits of Mind Model in a story that is culturally responsive to Hawaiian ways of knowing. In 2017, I incorporated the Hawaiʻi Department of Education’s Nā Hopena Aʻo (learning outcomes), adding a requirement that the story align with the Nā Hopena Aʻo as well as Hawaii Content and Performance Standards III for Health.

Beginning in 2017, teacher candidates were encouraged to add a Creative Commons license (which allows individuals to share their work, but retain copyright) to their storybook, and have their book included in the Mālama Honua Digital Storybook Series. In June 2017, the first titles in the series were shared publicly as part of the Mālama Honua Fair, celebrating the homecoming of the Hōkūleʻa. This event provide the authors the opportunity to showcase their work. As the teacher candidates shared their books with visitors who stopped by the UHWO exhibit space, it was heartwarming to observe the pride the authors had as children were reading their digital book on tablets and laptop computers. Parents and teachers were downloading the QR code to share the storybooks with their children and students.

Some teacher candidate are excited, and other are a bit intimidated at the start of the semester, when they learn they will be required to author and illustrate a children’s book. However, once they review the resources available through articles, videos, and websites, the trepidation turns to enthusiasm. Additionally, reviewing the titles in the Mālama Honua Series provides motivation and desire to see their story included in the series at the end of the course.

In addition to providing a collection of resources to support the process of writing childrenʻs literature and various media that can be used to illustrate their story, I scaffold this semester long project into steps, beginning with formation of peer review teams. During the first week of class, students join a peer review team of 4 to 5 students. The peer review teams each have a private discussion forum where they can share resources, and submit the stages of their project for feedback and review from their teammates. Providing feedback to their teammates also tends to strengthen their own project, and provides a support system.

The first submission is the ʻIke Ola Pono Digital Storybook Plan. Teacher candidates are provided with a planning template to scaffold the planning of their storybook, and identify how the story alignments with standards and outcomes.

The second step is the submission of the First Draft. This includes the manuscript and a storyboard for the conceptual design of the illustrations. Instructor and peer review feedback is provided. I also evaluate the manuscript for the readability level, using Readable.io. This tool provides feedback to determine if the manuscript is written at an appropriate reading level for the target age or grade level.

The third step is the submission of the Final Draft. This is the complete book in a digital format, with text and illustrations in the book format layout. Feedback is provided once again by peer review teammates as well as the instructor.

The published version is the final version of the storybook, submitted as the signature assignment. In the published version, the author is asked to add two lesson activities that can be used to extend learning opportunities, as well as the alignment to Health Education standards and the Nā Hopena Aʻo.

As the instructor, I serve as the editor for the series. As editor, my job is to ensure that illustrations that are not original artwork are correctly attributed, and overall professionalism of the published version. Not every ʻIke Ola Pono Digital Storybook submitted is represented in the series. However, as the series has grown to 23 titles, each semester the teacher candidate seem increasingly motivated to self-assess and produce a high quality project.

In order to continue the evolution of Open Pedagogy, ideas that I am considering are for teacher candidates to revise, remix, reuse titles in the Mālama Honua Digital Storybook Series. I am also planning Read-Aloud events where authors from the previous semester will read their book to children in local libraries, and in elementary school classrooms.

Key Takeaways

  • Model Use openly licensed instructional materials in your course (articles, textbooks, videos, podcasts, websites.)
  • Authentic assessment. Students are creating a meaningful product that will have an audience.
  • Scaffold Divide a semester-long project into incremental steps with formative feedback and reflection.
  • Self-assessment: Involve students in self-assessment of their work and classroom performance
  • Peer review. Use peer review for support and for improving student work.

My Ola Lunch by Rapunzel YaoFamily Kuleana by Macy ThoemmesKa Kumu Kawelo Papa by Justine MercadoHealthy Me, Healthy You by Kellie OshiroKa Nalu by Malia Rossetti

 

 

 

 

Sampling of screenshots above are from Mālama Honua Digital Storybook Series. Each storybook has been licensed by the student author under a Creative Commons license.

November 20, 2017
by junie
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OpenEd17

The 14th annual OpenEd17 conference was held in Anaheim, CA on October 11-13. Nearly 800 teaching faculty, librarians, instructional designers, and administrators attended the three-day conference focusing on all things related to Open Educational Resources (OER), open education, and open practice. Many sessions focused on the “Z-degree” initiatives at colleges, college systems, and states that are already implemented or are in development.  A “Z-degree” provides a complete pathway to graduation with zero textbook costs.

The UH System was represented by 10 faculty and staff representing librarians, instructors, and instructional designers from UH Manoa and 5 UHCC campuses (Honolulu, Kapiolani, Leeward, Maui, and Windward). Conference attendance for UHCC attendees was supported by the UHCC OER Initiative funds from Vice-President John Morton.

UH attendees at OpenEd 17

University of Hawaii attendees at OpenEd 17 in Anaheim, CA

Two conference sessions shared the progress of UH System OER initiatives. Our own Wayde Oshiro, Head Librarian and Sunny Pai, Digital Initiatives Librarian, Kapiʻolani Community College presented on the progress of OER in the UHCC system.

Collaboration and Contrast: How University of Hawaii Librarians Collaborate to Promote OER Across Contrasting Campuses and Cultures

Billy Meinke, OER Technologist, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa presented on the progress of OER at University of Hawai’i.

Empowering Faculty and Staff to Use OER at the University of Hawai’i

For more information about OER and how you can get involved, please see the Go Open, Go Free Using Open Educational Resources @ Leeward website.

October 23, 2017
by Rachael Inake
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Fall 2017 OER at Leeward CC

Once a month, the OER Campus Committee will share information about OER to raise awareness, promote, encourage, and support using OER at Leeward CC.

We are launching our first post, today, in the spirit of International Open Access Week (October 23 -29, 2017) to inform the campus about what OER is, why it matters, and what Leeward CC is doing.

What is OER?

Open Educational Resources (OER) are “teaching, learning, and research resources that reside in the public domain or have been released under an intellectual property license that permits their free use and re-purposing by others” (Hewlett Foundation). In other words:

  • OER is free to use; no strings attached
  • No permission is needed since the creator already grants it through a Creative Commons (CC) license
  • You can retain OER indefinitely
  • You can choose to modify OER to meet your teaching needs per rights granted by the license

Why does OER matter?

  • Saves students money
    • 25% of total college costs for Leeward students is for textbooks and supplies
    • Half of community college students rely on financial aid to pay textbook costs
    • 65% of these students use financial aid to pay for all textbook costs
  • Grants access to more choices of materials
  • Materials are publicly available for students to access before and after taking a course
  • Flexibility to customize or mashup several OER to create custom resources for your students

What is happening at Leeward CC?

Leeward CC supports “Textbook Cost: $0” and using OER. We have an OER Campus Committee, workshops, fellowship program, and more to support using OER at Leeward CC. See the infographic below for information and statistics for “Textbook Cost: $0.”

Textbook Cost: $0 infographic

Our numbers continue to increase regarding “Textbook Cost: $0” courses, students enrolled, subjects, and instructors.

Fall 15 Spr 16 Fall 16 Spr 17 Fall 17
“Textbook Cost: $0” CRN (sections) (% of all CRNs) 55 148 217 (19%) 279 (23%) 289 (27%)
Students enrolled in “Textbook Cost: $0” classes 2643 4194 5121 5371
“Textbook Cost: $0” different subjects 12 63 69 111 91
“Textbook Cost: $0” instructors 16 49 71 91 92

How can you get involved?

Be a part of this initiative to “Go Open, Go Free at Leeward CC” and use “Textbook Cost: $0” and/or OER materials in your classes. Contact the Library or EMC to get started. Also, visit our OER website for more information.

April 6, 2017
by Leanne Riseley
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Information and Computer Science Microbytes Revealed

Leeward Community College Information and Computer Science MicrobytesInformation and Computer Science Faculty: Blanca Polo, William Albritton, and Pete Gross are leading the effort in creating and sharing OER materials!

They created 78 short videos on a variety of computer science topics. The topics range from general information such as PowerPoint to more technical ones such as network security. Feel free to browse through the videos, which are available on the playlist.

The videos are licensed with a Creative Commons (CC BY NC ND) license, allowing anyone to use the videos as long as they are properly attributed. These videos may be linked to or embedded in your online course materials. If you need help with this, use our Technology One-on-One request form and one of the Educational Technologist will assist you.

If you are interested in creating your own microbytes or short videos, we encourage you to take advantage of the services of the Educational Media Center Video Production team who will work with you to create high quality OER resources for your students!

March 24, 2017
by Rachael Inake
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National Open Education Week

This concludes Leeward CC’s Open Education Week! Thank you for reading our blog posts and getting involved whether it may be in spreading awareness, inquiring for more information, using OER materials in your courses, or other things. Feel free to contact the friendly librarians on campus if you’re interested in utilizing open and/or OER materials in your courses.

If you’re interested in more, you can also check out how UH Manoa celebrated Open Education Week:

UHM Open Education Week Summary: Students at the Front

Lastly, if you’d like to get more involved, nationally, visit the Open Education Week’s website for other events – https://www.openeducationweek.org/events.

Mahalo, on behalf of the Leeward CC OER Committee!

March 23, 2017
by Wayde Oshiro
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What You Should Know About Publishers and their Amazing Discounted Prices

According to Pearson’s website, 64% of students surveyed are opting out of buying course materials and this “decision is having a negative impact on [their] choices,” which include “taking fewer courses per semester, not registering for a course, dropping a course, failing a course.” Leeward students reported similar, though, slightly lower percentages in our own textbook survey back in 2015. Our students are making the same hard choices as college students everywhere, even when the choices they make are detrimental to their academic success.

Pearson provides a complex diagram (to view, click the link and scroll down the page) showing the many decisions students make before they actually get their hands on a textbook. The interesting thing about this chart is that it leaves the obvious out of the picture – purchasing a textbook from the bookstore. It’s been clear for a while now that many students avoid the easiest way to get their textbooks because they can’t or won’t pay the retail prices.

Publishers are responsible for this situation. Their sky-high prices enabled by captive markets have allowed them to gouge students year after year.  Students are going through extraordinary means to acquire textbooks at more affordable prices and the publishers are with them every step of the way, erecting barriers to protect their revenue. Is this endless cat and mouse game helping us create the ideal climate for learning?

How is this impacting the publishers and why you should care

The current system is breaking down. Students are choosing not to buy their textbooks and the publishers are feeling the pinch. Revenues for the largest textbook publisher are down by double digits in 2016. According to Coram Williams, CFO, Pearson PLC:

[O]ur US higher education courseware business declined an unprecedented 18%, driven by three factors.

Firstly, enrolments were again weaker than our expectations, driven by pressures in the for-profit and community college channels.

Secondly, we saw a bigger-than-anticipated impact from rental.

And thirdly, and largest of all, at around two-thirds of the total, or 12%, we saw a significant inventory correction in the sales channel.

To recap, enrollments fell, alternative textbook acquisition models rose, and students are not buying textbooks from traditional retailers.

The publishers are responding to the changes in the marketplace. At a February 2017 conference call with investors, Kevin Capitani, President, North America, Pearson PLC, said “the year is shaping up fantastic,”

So we’re actually expanding what we’re doing in terms of how we’re going to attack the market at an institution or an administrator level, in addition to adoption level selling, which will remain incredibly important. But also, more direct to the consumer or the customer and the student. And if we set the business unit in higher ed particularly in that manner, we’ll be able to attack it a lot better, more comprehensive, and drive, let’s say, additional revenue at different points in the year, rather than just the adoption selling at two key intervals at each semester.

Beware of publishers bearing gifts

The digital direct access (DDA) strategy adopted by Pearson North America is one attempt to recapture revenue lost when students acquire textbooks through alternative methods and/or decide to not purchase them at all. The promise is affordability and access, but at what cost?

The language used by OER proponents and the publisher’s is becoming disquietly similar, but clearly the objectives are not. We are educators seeking to impart knowledge and help our students succeed in life. Ultimately, publishers are in the business to make a profit and students are the market. Students become even more valuable customers when they aren’t given a choice. You might say they don’t have a choice now when an instructor requires a textbook, but of course they have choices with used books, textbook rentals, book sharing, course reserves, etc. However, individual freedom to obtain lower priced course materials vanishes with the digital delivery model. Digital course materials are available only through a publisher’s proprietary (closed) platform. They control the content, the delivery, and the access. Sure, they might offer discounted prices, but you have to wonder why they couldn’t offer the same discounts in the first place with print textbooks. And just how long will the low prices last?

DDA programs automatically charge students for course materials at the time of enrollment. It’s not an opt-in, but an opt-out model. The opt-out is presented as a choice, but is it a real one? What happens when a student decides to opt-out? There is no secondary market for used digital textbooks or access codes. Without access to course materials, the student is in same bind as before trying to succeed when one of the essential requirements for succeeding is not available to them.

The sole purpose of DDA is to ensure steady, guaranteed revenue for the publisher. Minimum enrollment requirements ensure that the model also preserves the existing print textbook market. With DDA, publishers promise a near 100% sell-through rate for the program. Let’s say the e-text and platform access is priced at $50 (50% off the price for the print).  For a course with 100 students this will generate $5,000 in revenue.  The print version of the same textbook priced at $100 with a 50% sell-through rate (only half the students purchase it retail) generates the same revenue. The discount offered will never jeopardize what remains of the print market.  In other words, the discount received is in exchange for guaranteeing 100% sell-through rates to the publisher. What kind of bargain is this?

So what now?

Ultimately, the choice is yours. Just know that other options exist for course materials besides the traditional publishers. OER doesn’t require negotiating prices at all.  There are no access codes and the material is available to students indefinitely. You can even customize the material to better suit your students and your teaching needs. OER is developed by dedicated educators who decided that reliance on for-profit companies to develop educational materials leads to unaffordable prices, questionable practices, and lack of innovation. With OER, you are in control of the material, the teaching, and the learning.

If you looked for OER before but were not able to find materials that were satisfactory to you, don’t give up! Ask a librarian for help, they’re excellent searchers. And if nothing is available today it just means someone is hard at work developing great material they will share with you tomorrow.  That’s the beauty of OER, it’s a global collective of educators working for the common good. Lastly, don’t forget to ask your colleagues who made the switch. They are the best people to address your questions and concerns.

OER is becoming a greater threat to the publishing industry, John Fallon, CEO, Pearson PLC:

We’re also dealing with some potentially very disruptive threats. Currently, the negative impact that we’ve seen from OER is small, but it’s growing.

Indeed, OER may still be small but it’s a quickly growing movement. OER enables educators to collaboratively develop and distribute the materials needed to ensure affordable and equitable access to education for all students without compromise.

March 22, 2017
by junie
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OER Saved My Life

The following is a guest blog post by Borjana Lubura-Winchester, Geography Lecturer, Leeward Community College.

Aloha, my name is Borjana and I am a Geography lecturer at Leeward CC and the UH Manoa. Originally, I am from Sarajevo, Bosnia and a proud Leeward CC/Manoa graduate. First time I have learned about OER was last semester from our librarian Junie Hayashi. My students complained about high cost of the textbook I was using for one of my classes. In addition to high cost, I was using a very small portion of the book and could not find any alternative. I was constantly ‘bombarded’ with different publishers and offers via email or knocking on my office door, but nothing even close to what I wanted. Finally, I decided to create my own textbook and asked Junie for help. During our first meeting, Junie started telling me about OER and creative commons, licenses, copyright, etc. Oh boy, it was so overwhelming to me. I did not understand anything. I ‘jumped’ into compiling the resources week by week. Pretty soon I learned how hard process that could be. The OER workshop saved my life!

Participation in the OER workshop made a whole difference for me and my students. From the early start, the students did not have to worry about the textbook. There were no complains about ‘late Amazon arrivals’ or waits for the financial aid to ‘kick in.’ The material was immediately available online and ready to use. I cannot say that I was not skeptic at first about credibility and availability of the sources. However, the OER workshop and its facilitators Leanne, Junie and Wade helped me to get on a right path of finding sources I never knew existed before. The facilitators were patient with many of my questions and always willing to provide guidance for my subject matter. I discovered a well of available pictures, podcasts, documentaries, lectures, textbooks and various articles. Also, I realized that there is a completely new world of the community of authors who put hard work into creating these materials, yet enable them for anyone to use. At first, I did not want to share MY hard work, but (after participating in the workshop) I changed my attitude. Once my textbook is complete to the standard I feel comfortable with, I will upload it for use in the OER.

Finding sources is not an easy job. Giving the appropriate credit and using the appropriate attributions is crucial. Weekly homework and in-class activities with my colleagues helped me understand the process better. The teamwork cleared up any confusion and gave me the confirmation of how to find/attribute sources correctly. The facilitators had ‘easy to follow’ weekly assignments with the list of compiled instructions, links and directions for us to successfully complete the task.

Throughout the OER workshop I created my ‘road map’ toward OER courses. Because of the OER workshop, I am able to offer the rest of my classes with the OER for upcoming Fall 2017. I must admit, I am glad that there is the summer break coming up where I can spend a lot more time searching and building my source bank. My advice for instructors who plan on converting their classes to OER is to do it over the summer break where they might have more time. In the end, no matter when an instructor decides to take this journey, the OER is worth her/his time. I feel liberated and much confident in my classes and material I present to my students. It suits better the student learning objectives and their success in the classroom. It enables me to teach what matters the most in my discipline. Thank you OER team!

March 22, 2017
by junie
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OER Journey: From “Oh, What is That?” to “Oh, Wow!”

The following is a guest blog post by Faustino Dagdag, Business Management Instructor, Leeward Community College.

My first impression of OER was really “what is that thing people were calling OER”? OER in my mind was something that I should stay away from because it had to do with some kind of technology issue. And technology is not my “cup of tea”. Then at a Pacific Region Learning Seminar (PRLS) session last summer, I learned during a morning discussion that OER was a real way to provide students with text books without any cost to the student. I was however in the Art of Teaching Online PRLS track, but I was intrigued at the concept of free textbooks. I attempted to learn more about OER during meal breaks where I could ask those attending the OER track more about, how to provide “free textbooks”.

For myself one of the more distressing part of teaching is the growing number of students in the course who could not or would not purchase the assigned text due to financial reasons. Also growing is the number of students who are purchasing the text utilizing discount on-line sights which often delayed delivery of their copy. The issue of text book availability resulted in having to adjust the course delivery schedule often sacrificing valuable hands on in class activities time to provide for more content instruction at a slower pace to accommodate those with no text. This slower pacing jeopardizes the application gained knowledge due to investing more time in content driving as opposed to content usage. This problem now may have a solution in OER.

I needed to learn more. I had to learn more about it quickly because in the fall I was scheduled to teach a management course that was designated “No Cost textbook”. It is the goal for the management program which I belong, to support OER and No cost textbooks. My first experience was being provided the site for Saylor.org to research OER text books on Management. Luckily I found a suitable e-text book. However the search was difficult as well as cumbersome. And I thought “so this is OER”. Was I wrong.

In the fall semester I participated in the Teaching Excellence Program. One of the sessions was titled: “Student Engagement Using Technology and Open Education Resources”. Speakers showed how student engagement could be ignited by how the course content was provided and delivered using OER. This session opened my eyes and mind that OER was much more than free text books. It was a way to spark students imagination, creativity and engagement while building their knowledge and skills base for their future career. Additionally the session exposed me to the wide array of resource available for me to utilize to engage and teach my students. Still I needed to learn more regarding OER.

The next opportunity to learn more was the “Go open, go free with OER” workshop. The title is most appropriate, I learned that OER is more than free access to material but it was a way of sharing and collaborating to move ideas and thoughts forward to make it accessible to any and everyone who could find the idea valuable then they could add to the thought. The workshop provided a solid foundation to understanding OER as a practice as well as a philosophy. It showed me and the other participants how to share properly by learning about Creative Commons licenses, practices and ethics. It instructed us on the technical aspects of searching, using and sharing subject content. More importantly it provided reasons to let go of thinking knowledge is to be held as a possession but to see knowledge as a gift to be shared and grown.

This is just the start of my OER experience and pursuit of sharing. I have a desire to construct a course utilizing OER in totality not piece meal as I am utilizing it now. I have a kernel of an idea regarding that course. I’ll use the summer to fully develop my OER supported course, more exciting to me is the prospect of having students join the sharing process and experience. OER for me has gone from Oh, what is that to Oh wow.

March 21, 2017
by junie
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OER Opened My Eyes

The following is a guest blog post by Naiad Wong, Instructor, History, Leeward Community College.

I really appreciate how much this 7-week course has “opened” my eyes. Of course, I realized a while back that teaching was becoming more challenging as students are using more and more technology to get through class. Trying to keep up with the radical changes sometimes feels a bit overwhelming.

The information in this course has given me a great understanding of where I need to go with my own course but also in collaborating with my own department on how to upgrade our sources for Generation Z.

Right now, my biggest challenge will be trying to convert all my primary source readings and all textbooks into a format that students can access anywhere at anytime. This is especially true as more and more students are taking history classes at Leeward and they are from Kauai CC and Maui CC. The reason they like OER and online classes is that they have no such course on their campuses.

The “dialog” which has started in the Arts and Humanities department on making the switch is quite exciting to see but we know how much work still needs to be done. I consider this only the start and will be working with Wayde and the rest of the OER teachers — thanks Leanne and Junie — to really get this going.

We were essentially, “saved” this semester in terms of enrollment thanks NOT to our in-person classes but to our online classes which allow lower cost, more flexibility for all types of students, and also, access to OER materials which I cannot use the same way in on-campus classes.

OER will be THE tool which may save the humanities in the future. Actually, I am VERY sure that this is the case.

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