You identified some great qualities and practices …

You identified some great qualities and practices by your best teacher. I like them all and hope to incorporate all of those things into my online class. The ones I think make the biggest difference is clear expectations (overall), facilitating peer interaction, and giving students the opportunity to be peer critiqued and rewritten. I also like your last one and would generalize it as assignments that are geared toward real-world applications. Thanks for sharing your ideas. I enjoyed reading your post.

My favorite teacher

I still haven’t found where this assignment is located, but I’ve seen so many blog posts, I  thought I’d join in.

When I think back to my favorite teacher, I think back to a world before computers and standardized tests, back to fourth grade.  Mrs. Woods (Fern as she would later ask me to call her) was the most amazing teacher.  In a classroom before computers, she had us traveling the world through her themed assignments.  I remember studying the Amazon region.  Her husband (who was an art teacher at a local community college) came in and drew the most wonderful colored chalk mural on the blackboard.  Each day or two, he would come in before we arrived in class and add some facet.  Maybe a monkey, or bananas, etc.  She also had a missionary that had been to the region come talk to us.  I remember her helping a bunch of rowdy 4th graders who couldn’t have cared less about the ballet put on a version of the Nutcracker Suite for the entire school (what we didn’t know at the time was how much we were learning about Russia and Tchaikovsky while we were doing it).  I remember Kansas Day when we read “Little House on the Prairie” and learned about the pioneers and baked our own bread and made our own butter.  I especially remember the Hawaiian Tea Party.  We spent weeks learning about Hawaii.  We made our own leis and grass skirts.  We learned how to do the hula and to wrap everything up we had a party to welcome the 3rd graders into 4th grade.  We preformed the dances we had learned, made presentations about what we had learned, set off the volcano we had made for science, had coconut milk, coconut, bananas and pineapples.  It was a wonderful learning experience.

Could these learning experiences have been the same today?  I think so only they could be even magnified even bigger thanks to computers.  I can see where now students could communicate with someone living near the Amazon or in Hawaii.  I can see where students can be taken on virtual pioneer experiences.  But with today’s standardized test and having to teach to certain objectives, I feel like many times learning experiences are being left out of the classroom because of the pressure to “pass the test.”  Because of those pressures and the fact that often we rely too much on computers, students don’t get the same kind of experience I received and in many ways I think they are missing a tremendous education because we don’t give the future Mrs. Woods’s of the world an opportunity to bring this into the classroom.

Hello? Is anyone out there? Interaction is key to online teaching – Lori Rietze


First, I applaud the point offered by this site http://www.bestcollegesonline.com/blog/2012/10/02/22-secrets-from-the-most-successful-online-educators/ (Thank you to Dawn MacDonald!):What students can teach each other is just as important as what the professor teaches. I wholeheartedly agree and in this course, I am most interested in how to use technology to support active learning among and between the students.

Based on that learning objective, I will add to the conversation about this week's discussion questions.

My teaching Philosophy:
My beliefs are deeply rooted in constructivism. Defined by Dunn (2005), constructivism is an orientation where “individuals create or construct their own understanding/knowledge through the interaction of what they already know and through the ideas, events, and activities/experiences that they encounter” (p. 230). More specifically, social constructivism resonates with my philosophical views of the learning process as seen by Lens Vygotsky. In Vygotsky’s view, learning is a result of the interaction between the learner and the social environment, by way of reflection and meaningful discussions (Dunn, 2005; Pratt & Paterson, 2007; Vygotsky, 1978; Young & Maxwell, 2007). Like Vygotsky, I too believe that learning is enhanced when the material is meaningful to the students (Beatty, Leigh, & Dean, 2009; Vygotsky, 1978) and when social interaction is integrated into class activities.
 Some scholars argue that social interaction functions to increase the student’s awareness to social phenomena and new ideas. Kersten (2002), Schutz (1932) and Van Maanen (1983) suggest that people do not have the ability to see and understand the complexity of a scenario without pre-knowledge or a stock of knowledge that provides an awareness to the presence of social phenomena. Without a stock of knowledge in a particular area, the student requires another individual to help them notice things in which they lack experience. I believe that students have a stock of knowledge upon which educators can build, but I also hold that the role of the educator (and that of their peers) is to expand the student’s thinking, to notice the unnoticed.
Deciding and describing the ‘mix’ of face-to-face and online learning will be best for my course:
For my course, it is institutionally mandated that the delivery format will be a hybrid of face-to-face and online; the first week will be face-to-face and the subsequent weeks are online. I think my role will be to build their stock of knowledge and then by way of peer interaction, reflection and meaningful discussions, students will 'play' with the content and enhance their knowledge. As adult learners, I will be clear on my expectations related to postings and student contribution. I am interested to learn more about how I can embrace technology to stimulate discussion, critical thinking and peer learning.  I think that it may also be useful to contact some nurse leaders in the hospital setting and gain their perspective of the course content (these would be stakeholders). Perhaps I might do this by entering their comment into a twitter? How would I do that? Is this advantageous over a blog post? Perhaps I could ask students to download twitter on their handheld device and the message would be more immediate?

Hmm, it is tricky (but exciting) to intersect accessibility and course content. :)

Grading online discussions. Advice?

I always assign a weekly discussion based on something other than the textbook that is still topically-relevant- an academic article, a short video, etc. Many of my students are 18, and in general it takes awhile just to get the basics down- how often they need to post, to make sure to answer all parts of the question, etc. Since it’s typically a critical-thinking exercise and there are not really “right” answers for the questions, I generally grade them for participation. However by the end of the semester the quality of discussion goes downhill- in particular, I strongly suspect that the students don’t read the source material but just write something based on another student’s post.

Has anyone been in a similar spot? Does anyone have any suggestions?

Catching up…I hope!

Just thought I’d do a little catch up and try and be a bit more active after all you get out what you put in! You might need to remind me of that in the next week or two.

In my role at Riverina Institute (NSW Australia) I work as a Teaching and Learning Support Officer – basically to assist staff to use technology in teaching and learning. Prior to this I had had 15 years teaching in high schools, followed by 10 years teaching part time with Riverina Institute in Vocational Education, mainly in the area of Business.

My purpose for joing this MOOC is to learn what I can and use it to pass on in my work with staff to improve online delivery. We are keen to develop quality blended and online courses so a broad experience helps.

Over the last few years I have noticed a number of shifts related to online learning or should I say “evolution”? In the my early experience as online student it was more about resources but now we are more focused on the experience and developing cognitive skills of a much higher order through interaction (boo the resource dump which by the way I think still has a place for some learning formats).

I’m interested in seeing how the community develops and what gets us interacting – what will be the hooks that get us in and fired up? We are all time poor but participation is the key (so I’ll try not to be a lurker) but it’s the motivation that needs to be there and the ability to negotiate the technical “road blocks” – yep! I’m trying!

My best teacher – way back in high school I had a fantastic Maths teacher who suddenly had the subject making sense for me. She was the best because she was passionate, enthusiastic, had high expectations of us and developed and incredible rapport with us – we wanted to work with her and the rest just happened so it was about relationships and interactions. She was directed and there were clear boundaries but that made for a class environment that was a happy, nurturing and safe from judgement.

My worst teacher – they all blur into insignificance… probably because they won’t engaging and they didn’t foster good interactions and relationships.

In summary as a teacher in any environment:

  • Do get to know your students
  • Do prepare your “lessons”
  • Do have clear goals and expectations
  • Do curate, summarise and revise
  • Don’t “set and forget”
  • Don’t assume
  • Don’t forget that new environments are daunting
  • Don’t forget feedback

NYT op-ed on online learning

Who else saw this when they sat down to their computer this morning?

I was interested to read that studies have shown that disenfranchised students are more likely to drop out of online courses due to a lack of social ties in an online classroom. One of the reasons I have advocated for online courses is that they reach more students, many of whom may be disenfranchised. But if those students are the most likely to drop, then what is the benefit? Perhaps what he is eluding to is one thing I have also suspected- that online courses widen the gap between successful students and weaker ones.

Hirsch uses the Sea of Cortez as the larger context for his argument, showing how the unpredictability of the real world serves as a valuable educational tool. But I can’t help but this of the embedded elitism of this field trip. Most of my students can’t afford the cost or the time to listen to shrimp sounds in the Sea of Cortez. And doing away with online courses doesn’t enable them to do so.

I wonder about the author’s core assertion that the outside world no longer becomes a third party in online education. To prevent this, he suggests hybrid online-field courses, which have been shown to retain students more successfully than online courses. Seems like a good approach, though for better or worse they would require synchronous meetings.

I think that Sea of Cortez field trips are great for students with the means to go on them. But for other motivated, pro-active students whose lives, for whatever reason, don’t allow for in-person coursework, I think online courses remain a great option.

I need a good mini-lecture app or tool.

I am a relatively non-tech savy online instructor.  My first class was a cable course where students were supposed to watch a 45-minute lecture online, read instructions for essays online and then turn in essays and assignments via the internet.  It was awful, to say the least.  The lecturers had been prerecorded by another instructor many semesters prior, and the assignments weren’t even my own.  Because I was following someone else’s pre-designed course, I had to kind of follow along like a student. I’m going to be honest- I tried to watch the lectures.  They were exhausting.  They felt sloooooooooooooow, and since I couldn’t participate, they turned into a passive listening experience.  I usually started cooking or texting or painting my nails.  Usually cooking though.  I’d constantly tune out and then have to rewatch them looking for hints about the assignment.  After that experience, I knew that online lecturing was not the way to go.  

 

Nevertheless, I am auditory learner and I keep catching myself drawn to the videos over text when it comes to taking online classes.  Still, if the video is more than 3 minutes and starts off slow or resembles a power-point in any way, I’m out!  I may sound like some “over-stimulated” “tech-saturated” lazy-minded youngster with the attention-span of a hamster, but I’m not.  Give me a book and I’m satisfied sitting still for hours.  Put me on the internet and I want out as fast as possible.  I just like hearing things too.  

 

Thus, what I want, in order to make my online course more engaging for my auditory learners and my visual learners, is an app or a tool for recording short and sweet videos/teaching segments where I can highlight a concept that I really want my students to understand.  

I’ve never made a video in my life.  Help me?


Hello my name is @LeeBogner and I’m looking forward to taking #TOMOOC new online course how to teach online

My name is Lee Bogner, I am an adjunct professor of information systems and business analytics at Hofstra University in NY USA, where I teach Introduction to ECommerce as an online distance learning course.

I’ve been a CIO (chief information officer) and Digital Technologist at retail, media and tech companies where I’ve created and delivered online training, communications and community since 1996.

My intention is to learn from this course and my classmates to better my online instruction, and specifically by experiential and participative learning, and using best practices. Also I like to meet, and collaborate with, like-minded people from around the world. I believe engagement and participation are crucial to help remove the “distance” from distance learning.

I will contribute by communicating and collaborating with the class (people) as well as share learnings from my University online course which I just pushed live on Sept. 3. I would like to see “this” community develop naturally, perhaps with some “thought seeding” by the facilitators. I plan to participate and due to my background I see limited technical obstacles and I am open to assisting classmates and facilitators if and when needed.

I look forward to meeting you all!

Thank you!

LeeBogner

Reach @LeeBogner

LeeBognerHofstra@Gmail.com

Adjunct Instructor, IS and Business Analytics Dept. [new dept. name!]
Board Member, Zarb IT Executive Board of Visitors
Hofstra University
117 Weller Hall
Hempstead, New York
11549-1000
Google mail: LeeBognerHofstra@Gmail.com
Reach @LeeBogner on many Social networks and communities, including:
Twitter | LinkedIn | Google+  | Slideshare | LeeBogner.com | Hofstra U | St. John’s U | Skype | RebelMouse

Hello, my name is…(handshake)

1.Introduce yourself  to the workshop on your blog or here.
Hello, I am a nursing educator from Ontario. I have 3 children and I am a distance PhD student through the University of Victoria in British Columbia.

1.What is your intention for this workshop (why are you here)?
I am here to learn more about how I can use blogs, twitter and other online forums to enhance my teaching experience to facilitate learning with students who geographically distant.

2.What issues do you think are important?
In this course, I am interested to learn more about how to facilitate critical thinking, peer learning and community, leadership, critical questioning, mentorship, and student/educator connection.

3.How  will contribute?
I will contribute by posting on my blog and following the weekly activities. I will probably have more of a 'backseat' for some weeks and enhanced engagement for others that are more applicable to my learning needs.

4.How would you like to see community develop among participants?
Critical questioning, peer support, referencing to different interactive online resources

5.These types of workshops are new for most people. In fact  about 90% don’t even participate. How will you overcome the fear of learning in the open and the frustration of using new technology, courageously work through any setbacks, and not give up?
I will likely use twitter (totally new for me) to ask quick focused questions and I am fortunate because my sister (Dawn MacDonald) is also taking this course. I can ask dorky questions to her!

Describe your best teacher and your worst teacher ever.
  • asked questions that made us think about relationships between concepts or ideas that we already learned
  • had clear expectations related to postings
  • was available to address all of the student's posted activities
  • made the environment comfortable to ask questions that are at a novice level
  • facilitated peer interaction
  • assignments that were peer critiqued and then re-written for grades
  • assignments that were geared to publications
1.What types of  behavior and interaction with students are most memorable?
  • encouraging but not fake
  • engaged and useful feedback
  • thoughtful reflections

Online Lectures using Camtasia

So I teach an online Human Geography course for HPU, and lately I have been using Camtasia 2 to record PowerPoint-based lectures with video accompaniment. Since the class is asynchronous, I find this is a good way to provide my students with a classroom-type setting. While I have taught the course for two years now, this is the first semester I have added lectures. It’s time consuming now, but I figure I can reuse them in future semesters.

Has anyone else used a similar tool? How have your students responded?

HERE is my first lecture, an Introduction to Human Geography, based on Visualizing Human Geography by Alison Grenier. The ppts come with the instructor resources, and I haven’t altered them much at all.

How can I view other folks’ posts and for whom exactly is this course?

I'm still trying to figure out this whole MOOC thing. I like when we receive an email with a whole list of people's posts, but am trying to figure out how I can see some of those posts without having the email handy. Can I only view those posts when invited to view them or when they come in the long list?

I was hoping this course was for those who don't have a whole lot of Internet experience, other than blogging or running a business online. Is this course just totally geared to people who teach online through universities and colleges? Or can those of us who want to learn Internet business techniques benefit?

MAM


Week 0 – Post 1

Howzit! My name is Robin, I am a social worker and employee at UH-Manoa.  I had many moments this week questioning why I had decided to do this, but after sitting down and looking at them material for this week and writing my blog entry, I am optimistic about this opportunity.  Best of luck to everyone!
What is your intention for this course (why are you here)?
I'm here to learn and improve my ability to create an engaging class.  I've taught graduate courses in social work since 2011 in a variety of formats (through interactive television, blackboard, and face-to-face).  Each semester I am able to learn new skills that I apply moving forward, yet I desire to learn more.
What issues do you think are important?
In terms of education, I feel the most important issue is how to engage learners and assist them acquiring the necessary knowledge, skills, and abilities to be successful in the future. I also think it is important that more time and focus is directed towards the theories and philosophies driving education and the application of these items in practice.  On a grander scale, I think poverty, the distribution of wealth, equal access to resources, and healthcare top my list of important issues... Additional note, I also believe free resources are important.  In fact they are so important that after creating a blog in edublogs, I moved to back to google's blogger because many of the features I would like for my blog appear to cost money... Free is always best... Now I am trying to do two blogs with the same or similar content.  I secretly don't want to abandon edublog as I would like to learn it as well. 
How will you contribute?
Good question.  I have attempted blogs multiple times in the past and have never remained actively engaged.  So in starting this blog, I am worried that it will be another failed attempt on my part.  I am a resource sharer.  I like giving out information as I find its applicability to people and situations.  I also like discussion.  So if I had to pick two areas that I will try my hardest to contribute in, it would be sharing resources and engaging in conversation.
How would you like to see community develop among participants?
I am an advocate for learning communities.  I am hopeful that this will continue to be a forum for discussion and learning.  In adult learning, there is an assumption that every learner brings something to the table, an expert in something.  I am hopeful that as a community of learners we can facilitate a fruitful discussion that drives each of our abilities to facilitate online learning, thus moving education forward.
These types of courses are new for most people. In fact about 90% don’t even participate. How will you overcome the fear of learning in the open and the frustration of using new technology? How do you plan to courageously work through any setbacks, and not give up?                                                                                                                                                      New technology is not a fear of mine.  I am an early adopter and try many different means to figure out what will work best for me and my situation.  The openness of a blog is something that I will have to work on.  I've instituted some new elements to a class I am teaching that I believe will help me become less fearful of appearing like an idiot and more able to go with the flow.  The public aspect of this can be concerning.  I get most fearful in thinking about how my words are perceived.  With the changing times, it is important to move beyond this and accept that this is part of the new normal. Time will be challenging.  I have a lot on my plate and much more that I want to accomplish.  I need to continue to find the meaning behind the exercises and see how this is truly an opportunity to improve my skills.  If I can keep that mindset, I believe I will remain engaged.
Full disclosure, I didn't read everything that was asked originally and had to go back and add content to my first blog post.  So in essence, this is post 1.1....
The best teachers I ever had were those that both identified my potential but didn't let me be complacent.  There are many examples in my past in which I felt my instructors didn't challenge me, they saw my ability to learn and engage in class and were okay with it.  And in those classes I don't feel that I acquired as much as I could have nor did I retain that which I did learn. My most memorable interactions are those that have a conversation.  Where there is disagreement and it is welcomed.  I also value fairness and have taken this lesson with me in my role as an instructor.  I strive to challenge and inspire my students while also ensuring there is fairness.

In thinking of those experiences that were less than positive in learning, I identify those elements in which engagement is a problem (meaning I am not engaged), discussion is not welcomed (or if it is welcomed it is dismissed when it does not align with the instructors view of the situation), and the instructor did not appear to be engaged in the material.  
Making meaning of this content is also important for me.  And to make meaning of the content I have to see how I can build the parallel to my practice in social work.  
I am grateful for the "wear a hat when you comment" and "sensemaking" material.  I've been struggling with developing an activity for my class on providing feedback to classmates.  This material will help them reconsider the multiple ways we provide feedback.  MAHALO!

Why Am I Here?

I want to learn new skills. I have an online local news source business, but I also want to create a course useful for folks in my field—journalism. I love learning new things, and I love challenges. This seemed like a wonderful thing to challenge my aging brain. I hope I'm not the only "old" lady here - of an age when I SHOULD be retired, but am having too much fun with my business.

Just started the class

Today, I started taking the How to Teach Online course.  A bit of catching up to do since the actual course started on Monday.  I’ve done a little bit of Blackboard and blogging, but I can already tell that this class will hold a lot of new experience for me and I am very excited, as well as a bit nervous.

So, here’s my Aloha Discussion.

I’m here because I would like to be an online teacher someday.  I currently teach part time in traditional classrooms and I love it.  But recently I have taken several MOOCs and it really opened up my eyes to what these courses can do.  I teach Biology, so I am especially interested in finding out how to get the hands-on component of science classes (such as lab experiments etc)  online.  I am hoping that I can use this class to build my online tools for my future classes, and that will motivate me to keep participating in the class.    For a beginner, it’s so overwhelming to face all these new technology, but it was encouraging to hear Greg say “Pick and Choose”.  Look forward to do my best to be a part of the online community and to see what others have to offer!

How to Teach Online – Week 0

Not sure if I did the Category thing right, so we’ll see.

Why am I here? This is my first MOOC so I’m curious to experience it. I work for an organization that offers instructor-led online courses. Students in a course are assigned to groups and have an instructor. Work is mostly done asynchronously, but according to a schedule. Most of the interaction between participants and with the instructor is via the class discussion boards. I’d like to see if there is anything in this MOOC that I can use to make our courses better.

What issues do I think are important? Getting people to interact online. Many complain that they feel isolated, but getting them to post to discussions, including reviewing and commenting on other posts is difficult. Also, I’m interested in learning more about how to use things like Twitter in courses as well as learning what some of the following are and how to use: Evernote, Socrative, Poll Everywhere, Schoology.

How will you contribute? I’m still trying to figure out the site (now I know how confused our students feel the first time they login our course site –lol!). If this posting works, I’ll continue to contribute that way. If there are other tools we can use to contribute I’ll try that as well as I learn more. Mostly, I’ll try to step outside of my comfort zone and share my experiences while also learning from others.

How would you like to see the community develop? Really not sure about this. I think that part of my experience will be just seeing how things evolve.


Online geospatial mapping course

As someone who teaches geography online, I was interested in First Syndication Post’s mention of a coursera-based geography course. Penn State is one of the best geography schools in the country, so I am not surprised that they have jumped on the online teaching bandwagon. Looks like a great course, but when I searched for more geography courses on coursera I didn’t find any…is this because my search terms are wrong or because they don’t exist? It would be cool to start to start a list of all the online geography courses out there, both open-access and non…

 

Why I’m here!

Actually having to write down my thoughts rather than just thinking them in my head was a useful activity. Reflecting (written) is something I get my students to do regulary, but I’ve just realised that I’d also benefit from doing this more often – and that’s why I’ve now started to blog! What is your [...]

Why I’m here!

Actually having to write down my thoughts rather than just thinking them in my head was a useful activity. Reflecting (written) is something I get my students to do regulary, but I’ve just realised that I’d also benefit from doing this more often – and that’s why I’ve now started to blog!

What is your intention for this course (why are you here)?

I want to see what it feels like to do a MOOC – I’ve read so much about this type of learning and want to get some real-life, hands-on experience of what a MOOC really is. And at the same time, I want to learn more about teaching online. I think it’ll also be a very useful learning experience to be a “student” again, i.e. on the receiving end of online learning, and to experience what it’s like to feel confused, incompetent, lost, the only one who can’t get a tool to work etc. I’m sure this will help me to be more patient and to empathize more with my students in the future. I teach English for Specific Purposes (ESP) courses at a university in Austria. These are run in blended learning mode, so I have some experience of teaching online. But since we all get to see each other F2F approximately once a month, this means technical glitches etc. can also be sorted out in person if no solution could be found during the online phases, which makes life easier!

What issues do you think are important?

I think it’s extremely important that we (the participants) know what we’ve got to do – so far, so good – and that we get prompt support if we ask for this – has also proved to be true – thank you!. For example, I couldn’t get my blog connected and found it extremely frustrating that it was working for everyone else (?) but not for me. But I was delighted to get an email (in response to mine) from Greg the same day saying he’ll fix it. It still doesn’t work, but at least I felt heard/acknowledged and not totally alone! Yes, I think effective and timely communication between facilitators and participants is a really important issue. I think it’s important for me to be selective when deciding what to read/do etc. and to accept that I won’t be able to do everything. I’ll also need to manage my time carefully and not spend too much time thinking (and sometimes worrying if I’m doing the right thing!) about this MOOC! As mentioned on the webinar on blogging: “Don’t worry about it! Don’t try to be perfect! Just do it!” This was really helpful – thanks, Sue!

How will you contribute?

Because of time differences, I’ll probably not be participating live in the webinars – most of them are between 1am and 4am for me, i.e. when I’m usually fast asleep! But they’ll all be recorded, so I’ll watch them when I’m awake. Yes, and in the meantime, I’ve watched both from 0 week. This means I won’t be able to actually contribute, but at least I won’t miss anything. And I’m pretty sure that someone else will have asked similar queries to mine! Otherwise, I’ll be communicating via my blog, once it’s finally connected! And I intend to read and reply to other participants postings – let’s see! I will post and have already posted on the community wall but would prefer to have everything documented on my blog and feed through. I’ve also joined the Google+ TOMOOC community and posted, and have tweeted once about the course – I’m not really comfortable about tweeting  – much prefer following and reading other people’s tweets – so this is something I’m planning to do more often till it feels more normal! All in all, it’s going to be too time-consuming posting everywhere, so I’ll probably just focus on adding my thoughts to my blog and replying to other participants’’ blog postings.

How would you like to see community develop among participants?

I’m hoping to experience a real sense of community, which can only develop by us participating and sharing our views etc., and which I’m prepared to do. I also think it might be a good idea for those of us who are in a similar time zone to get together from time to time on Blackboard to have a live sharing/support session. We’d then form a kind of “local time” community!

These types of courses are new for most people. In fact about 90% don’t even participate. How will you overcome the fear of learning in the open and the frustration of using new technology? How do you plan to courageously work through any setbacks, and not give up?

I’m currently experiencing technology frustration – getting my blog connected – and having a good grumble with my husband was a big help! Also, getting suport from Greg and Sue/edublogs was great. So I will continue to ask for help if I need it. But generally speaking, I enjoy trying out new technology – this is one of the reasons I’m doing this MOOC – so I’m pretty sure I won’t give up. I don’t really like giving up things I start without a really good reason, i.e. the course would have to be a real mess and total waste of my time and effort, something I don’t anticipate. Re overcoming the fear of learning in the open – it’s not something that bothers me at the moment, and I comfort myself by thinking I’m probably not the only one that maybe doesn’t know the “right” answers, if there are any. But time will tell!

How to Teach Online MOOC

I just signed up for LCC's "Teaching Online" MOOC, and this will be my second foray into the world of MOOCs. My first MOOC was one through Coursera, in a Geography MOOC by Penn. State.  While I found the course material interesting, I had a hard time setting aside time for the course and ultimately didn't finish it in time.  Despite this, I still plan to finish the course.  I'm hoping that this MOOC will be a different experience for me, as this will be motivated by work rather than personally.  I have studied Educational Technology for the last 6 years, but I'm hoping that this MOOC will help me brush up on the latest technologies, research findings, and trends.

In the past I've been more of a lurker in terms of blogging or participating in discussion boards, but I hope to more active in the future.  I think being more active will hopefully improve my retention of the course material, and develop community with fellow participants.  By participating and commenting on others blogs, as well as whatever else is posted, I think is a great way for teachers and students to interact.  Nothing is more frustrating when you asked to post but no one comments.  It almost makes the exercise feel pointless.

DOs and DONT's for Teaching (Online and otherwise)

  • DO
    • Have clear instructions and expectations
    • Participate in class discussions
    • Offer positive and constructive feecback
    • Remind students of expectations
  • DON'T
    • Be a talking head, give students the opportunity to learn a little more about you
    • Post assignments and readings willy nilly.  Be clear at the beginning where everything will be posted
    • Expect all learners to come in with the same background.  If it is technology related, poll participants first to get a consensus, and if backgrounds are diverse, split up instruction so that people can pick what best fits their needs
    • be rigid.  Like teaching F2F, things can change and teachers and students need to be flexible.

Things I've learned this week:

  • Videos can be effective when they are engaging, like this week's video.

How to Teach Online MOOC

I just signed up for LCC's "Teaching Online" MOOC, and this will be my second foray into the world of MOOCs. My first MOOC was one through Coursera, in a Geography MOOC by Penn. State.  While I found the course material interesting, I had a hard time setting aside time for the course and ultimately didn't finish it in time.  Despite this, I still plan to finish the course.  I'm hoping that this MOOC will be a different experience for me, as this will be motivated by work rather than personally.  I have studied Educational Technology for the last 6 years, but I'm hoping that this MOOC will help me brush up on the latest technologies, research findings, and trends.

In the past I've been more of a lurker in terms of blogging or participating in discussion boards, but I hope to more active in the future.  I think being more active will hopefully improve my retention of the course material, and develop community with fellow participants.  By participating and commenting on others blogs, as well as whatever else is posted, I think is a great way for teachers and students to interact.  Nothing is more frustrating when you asked to post but no one comments.  It almost makes the exercise feel pointless.

DOs and DONT's for Teaching (Online and otherwise)

  • DO
    • Have clear instructions and expectations
    • Participate in class discussions
    • Offer positive and constructive feecback
    • Remind students of expectations
  • DON'T
    • Be a talking head, give students the opportunity to learn a little more about you
    • Post assignments and readings willy nilly.  Be clear at the beginning where everything will be posted
    • Expect all learners to come in with the same background.  If it is technology related, poll participants first to get a consensus, and if backgrounds are diverse, split up instruction so that people can pick what best fits their needs
    • be rigid.  Like teaching F2F, things can change and teachers and students need to be flexible.

Things I've learned this week:

  • Videos can be effective when they are engaging, like this week's video.

My first achievement


Although I'm sorry about missing last night's webinar, because somehow I didn't know about it, I did figure out today how to follow people, so Norene and Jenn I think I'm following you.

I hope somebody somehow will soon discover me, because I don't know how to "get out there: Hello! It's me, why doesn't anyone see me?"

Mary Alice

Addressing Questions

Hello Everyone,

My name is Sara and I am the Online Coordinator at Allen Community College.  While I am not currently teaching online, I have in the past and have enjoyed it. I am hoping that this course will provide me with some ideas that I can use should I teach online again in the future.  In the meantime, I hope to take what I learn here and share it with the teachers I work with so that they can in turn improve their online courses.

In addition to gaining new ideas, I am interested in learning more about the MOOC experience.  This is my first MOOC and honestly right now it’s a little intimidating.  I’m learning so much already as I have not previously blogged, used Twitter, or Google + before.  Please forgive me for any slip-ups as I stumble my way through this.  My blog address is:  http://saradreisbach.edublogs.org.

 

Here we go!

Hello! My name is Jenn and this blog is part of my participation in a massive online learning course (mooc) offered through Leeward Community College. The focus of the course is “How to Teach Online”, as so far I feel a bit like how I imagine the students in my online course feel when the course starts- a little overwhelmed, behind, and struggling to carve out space to truly engage! My family just moved from Oahu to Santa Barbara, and since our internet was just connected yesterday I should be on my way to full participation.

Currently I am a PhD candidate in Geography at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. I am also the instructor of record for an Introduction to Human Geography course at Hawaii Pacific University. I teach either one or two sections per semester, and usually a smaller section during the summer. I am always interested in how to improve my course- hence taking this class.

I have some aspects of my course that I would like to improve, and I am interested in learning from my classmates about how to address concerns specific to online teaching. I also hope to become familiar with tools that will enable more engagement with my students, such as Blackboard Collaborate. Overall I am looking forward to learning from and sharing with all of you.

How to Teach Online (tomooc) Aloha Discussion

8831965236_e6123bb9bc_bThis is my first post for the How to Teach Online cMOOC. This is the second time I have signed up for a connectivist MOOC, but this time I have a better idea of what to expect and so my intention is very different.

Last time I didn’t realise there were different types of MOOC so I was putting a lot of emphasis on the ‘course’ part and expecting quite a clear structure, this time I am intending to view this as an extension of my PLN. Indeed, it was through G+ that I heard of the MOOC and apart from breathing life back into this blog the rest of the requirements are things I would normally be expecting to do as part of my online professional learning.

But why am I here specifically rather than in some other cMOOC? I work in the area of education technology in Higher Education and support others in using a VLE as part of campus-based courses but would like to develop my understanding of online teaching further as HEIs look to the future of distance learning.

What issues do I think are important? That’s a big question. I’m not sure if it relates to issues in online teaching or issues in cMOOCs or both. I suppose they are related. For learning in a cMOOC the issues are going to be about finding time to read materials, create artefacts and respond to others.

For teaching online, my initial thoughts are that issues are likely to arise if trying to translate classroom practices to the online environment. It will be interesting to see how the essence of good pedagogy can be transferred to a new space in new ways.

I will be contributing on this blog, via Google plus (which is the hub of my PLN) and not so much via Twitter (@annehole) and of course commenting on others’ contributions.

I would like to see the community develop into a lively professional learning network that will continue to share resources and discuss online teaching and related topics long after the MOOC has ended. The setting up of the G+ community is a good start on this.

I will try to be a good student and participate throughout the course. I’m not too fearful of learning in the open and if I get scared I’ll just retreat a little and lurk! The technologies involved are not new to me as I’ve been using WordPress for the RUSTLEblog for a couple of years so I don’t anticipate any insurmountable setbacks. I am going away for a few days during the run of the MOOC, but expect to have good Wifi so any silence will just be down to the need to unwind!

So, there you have it. Now I can’t wait to get started.


Teaching Online Introduction

Hi, my name is Sara Dreisbach and I’m the Online Learning Coordinator at Allen Community College in Kansas.  This is my first time participating in a MOOC so it’s a little intimidating for me right now.  I’m taking this MOOC with hopes of gaining some information that I might be able to pass along to the teachers I work with.  Also I wanted to experience what it is like to participate in a MOOC.