Tracking Online Education in the United States, 2014

Grade Level:Tracking Online Education in the United States is the twelfth annual report on the state of online learning in U.S. higher education. The 2014 Survey of Online Learning conducted by the Babson Survey Research Group and co-sponsored by the Online Learning Consortium (OLC), Pearson and Tyton Partners, reveals the number of higher education students taking at least one distance education course in 2014 is up 3.7 percent from the previous year. While this represents the slowest rate of increase in over a decade, online enrollment growth far exceeded that of overall higher education.

Key report findings include:

  • The year-to-year 3.7% increase in the number of distance education students is the lowest recorded over the 13 years of this report series.
  • Public and private nonprofit institutions recorded distance enrollment growth, but these were offset by a decrease among for-profit institutions.
  • The percent of academic leaders rating the learning outcomes in online education as the same or superior to those in face-to-face remained unchanged at 74.1%.
  • The proportion of chief academic leaders reporting online learning is critical to their long-term strategy reached a new high of 70.8%.
  • Only 28.0% of academic leaders say that their faculty accept the “value and legitimacy of online education.”
  • The adoption of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Course) is reaching a plateau, only 8.0% of higher education institutions currently offer one, another 5.6% report MOOCs are in the planning stages.
  • The proportion of academic leaders who believe that MOOCs represent a sustainable method for offering online courses dropped to 16.3%.

Read the Press Release

Teach the Web: The Web Literacy Standard for You & Your Students

The Web Literacy Standard is a map of competencies and skills that Mozilla and our community of stakeholders believe are important to pay attention to when getting better at reading, writing and participating on the web. Keep up to date with the latest changes to the Web Literacy Standard on the wiki.

Building

 Mozilla has  creative ways to help anyone teach web literacy, digital skills and making. Use our free tools, activities and lesson plans. Or make your own – with help from our global community of educators, techies and mentors like you. Webmaker —is  a Mozilla project dedicated to helping you create something amazing on the web. Our toolsevents and teaching guides allow webmakers to not only create the content that makes the web great, but — perhaps more importantly — understand how the web works. With this knowledge, we can make a web without limits. That’s the philosophy behind webmaker.org. We’ve built everything so you can see how it works, take it apart and remix it.

 

Webinar Tuesday: Designing productive tasks in authentic learning environments

Tuesday, October 8, 2013, 3 PM – 4 PM Hawaii Standard Time (HST). World Clock 

There is no more important pedagogical role for teachers than the design of learning tasks and assessment. An authentic learning approach enables educators to design tasks and assessments that are authentic because they are ‘cognitively real’, and they focus on students collaboratively creating genuine products that are polished and professional. Authentic learning can be very challenging to design because of this need to create such all-encompassing tasks that effectively form the basis of a whole topic or unit of study. In this presentation, I will focus on the importance of creating a real product as an outcome of an authentic task, and discuss with participants some of the difficulties and benefits associated with this challenge.

By Jan Herrington

Dr Jan Herrington is a Professor of Education at Murdoch University in Perth, Western Australia, where she teaches in the educational technology area in the School of Education, including a compulsory first year unit in the BEd called ‘Living and Learning with Technology’. She has been active in the promotion and support of the effective use of educational technologies in learning in schools and universities for over two decades. In this time, she has co-written or edited a range of books specifically for teachers in higher education on a variety of technology and teaching-related subjects, including Authentic learning environments in higher education (with Anthony Herrington), and most recently, A guide to authentic e-learning (with Thomas C Reeves and Ron Oliver) which was winner of the AECT Outstanding Book of the Year Award in 2010.

Jan’s current research focuses on authentic learning, the design of effective online learning environments for schools and higher education, and mobile learning. She has led two ARC grants investigating authentic tasks and the design-research approach. She has published over 150 refereed journal articles, conference papers and chapters. She was the Project Leader on the ALTC funded project: New technologies: New pedagogies (2006-2008), which investigated pedagogies appropriate to mobile learning. She is a former Fulbright Scholar who, in 2002, conducted research in authentic learning environments at the University of Georgia, USA. She has won many awards for her research including the Association for Educational Communication and Technology (AECT) Young Researcher of the Year Award, and several Outstanding Paper awards at international conferences, most recently at ascilite 2010, Global Learn 2011, and IADIS, 2012.

Webinar Tuesday: Engaging Students in Taking Ownership of Content Through Thinking…

Tuesday , October 1st, 12 pm- 1 pm, Hawaii Standard Time (HST). World Clock 

A key insight into content (and into thinking) is that all content represents a distinctive mode of thinking. Math becomes intelligible as one learns to think mathematically. Biology becomes intelligible as one learns to think biologically. History becomes intelligible as one learns to think historically. This is true because all subjects are: generated by thinking, organized by thinking, analyzed by thinking, synthesized by thinking, expressed by thinking, evaluated by thinking, restructured by thinking, maintained by thinking, transformed by thinking, LEARNED by thinking, UNDERSTOOD by thinking, APPLIED by thinking. If you try to take the thinking out of content, you have nothing, literally nothing, remaining. Learning to think within a unique system of meanings is the key to learning any content whatsoever. This session, in other words, explores the intimate, indeed the inseparable relationship between content and thinking.

By Dr. Linda Elder

Dr. Linda Elder is an educational psychologist and a prominent authority on critical thinking. She is President of the Foundation for Critical Thinking and Executive Director of the Center for Critical Thinking. Dr. Elder has taught psychology and critical thinking at the college level and has given presentations to more than 20,000 educators at all levels. She has co-authored four books, including Critical Thinking: Tools for Taking Charge of Your Learning and Your Life, Critical Thinking: Tools for Taking Charge of Your Professional and Personal Life and Twenty-Five Days to Better Thinking and Better Living. She has co-authored eighteen thinker’s guides on critical thinking and co-authors a quarterly column on critical thinking in the Journal of Developmental Education.

Dr. Elder has also developed an original stage theory of critical thinking development.  Concerned with understanding and illuminating the relationship between thinking and affect, and the barriers to critical thinking, Dr. Elder has placed these issues at the center of her thinking and her work.

With experience in both administration and the classroom, Dr. Elder understands firsthand the problems facing educators. She is a dynamic presenter who reaches her audience on a person-to person level.

Webinar Monday 9/30- How to Promote Critical Thinking in the Online Classroom

How to Promote Critical Thinking in the Online Classroom

Monday, September 30th, 12pm- 1pm, Hawaii Standard Time (HST). World Clock 

Overview:  The webinar will comprise a 15 to 20 minute presentation on the fundamentals of presence in the online classroom, with a focus on strategies that promote critical thinking. Power point slides will accompany the presentation, and can be made available to participants. Questions from participants will be encouraged.

Webinar Description:Strategies for promoting critical thinking among online students are shared and discussed in this Webinar. Participants will identify the three core principles needed to create an online presence—the foundation of promoting deep and meaningful learning for online students. This interactive session will provide opportunity for discussion, and participants will leave with ideas and tactics for creating a strategy that promotes critical thinking in their own online classroom.

By Debbie Morrison

Week 4 (Sept. 30-Oct.6)

Objective: Decide how you create a “natural critical learning environment” in your online courses.

Aloha and welcome to Week 4- Create a natural critical learning environment. Please begin by reviewing the resources on how to create a natural critical learning environment.  Choose and explore topics that meet your needs and interests. Topics:

  • What is a “natural critical learning environment”?
  • Thinking is Driven by Questions
  • Questioning Strategies

Week 4 Activities & Webinars. Pick and choose what you will do this week.


Recorded webinars

  • How to Promote Critical Thinking in the Online Classroom By Debbie Morrison
  • Engaging Students in Taking Ownership of Content Through Thinking…By Dr. Linda Elder,
    • President of the Foundation for Critical Thinking and Executive Director of the Center for Critical Thinking
    • Full recording (opens in Blackboard Collaborate)
  • Weekly Roundup. Join our session of highlights from the week.

Week 3 (September 23 – 29)

Objective this week: Decide how you will “build community” in your online courses.

Aloha and welcome to Week 3– Create a Community: Connect learners with each other. Please begin by reviewing the resources on how to connect learners with each other.  Choose and explore topics that meet your needs and interests. Topics:

  • Interaction: the keystone of contemporary education.
  • Community of Inquiry
    • Building An Online Learning Community
    • The Community of Inquiry theoretical framework
    • Critical Inquiry in a Text-Based Environment: Computer Conferencing in Higher Education
  • Creating Interactive Discussions
    • Why should I use a discussion board?
    • The Discussion Board Book
  • Blogs
    • How to use blogs for learning and teaching
    • Using a blog to create and support a Community of Inquiry in Secondary Education

Week 3 Activities & Webinars. Pick and choose what you will do this week.


Webinar Sessions (all sessions will be recorded)


Stephen Downes in Connectivism and the Primal Scream…

Stephen Downes in, Connectivism and the Primal Scream states,

“At a certain point, we want people to stop being novices, and to start being self-motivated and self-managing learners.The idea that we are treating university students and adults as ‘novices’ is, to my mind, appalling. If a grown adult still requires a teacher to provide encouragement and support, positive role models, to select resources and scaffold learning experiences, then that speaks to the substantial failure of the traditional system of education. To my mind, it is as astonishing a failure as it would be if adults expected their teachers to read the lessons aloud to them.”

Thoughts? Agree, why? Disagree, why?

http://halfanhour.blogspot.com/2013/07/connectvism-and-primal-scream.html

WEBINAR TODAY (9/18) Principles of Effective Online Teaching: Best Practices in Distance Education

Wednesday, September 18th,  12 pm- 1 pm, Hawaii Standard Time (HST).  World Clock  Teaching online for the first time is a little like trying to drive a car in a foreign country. You know how to drive, just like you know how to teach, but it sure is hard to get the hang of driving on the left side of the road … you’re not quite sure how far a kilometer is … and darn it if those road signs aren’t all in Japanese

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Dr. Lawrence C. Ragan has played a leadership role in the development of Penn State’s World Campus since the start of the initiative in 1998 serving as the Director of Instructional Design and Development, Director of Faculty Development, and most recently appointed as Co-Director of the Center for Online Innovation in Learning. Dr. Ragan presents internationally on the topics quality assurance online, instructional design, multimedia integration, faculty development programming, and instructional design for distance and blended education.

Webinars TODAY!

So how do teachers close the “distance” gap and build rapport?

Tuesday , September 17th,  2 pm- 3 pm, Hawaii Standard Time (HST). World Clock Discussion on

  •  the importance of intro videos (can be simple….recorded with an iPhone or iPad) and provide 10 tips to recording to set the students up for success
  • Importance of responding to emails within 24 hours and tips for managing emails and diminishing the amount of technical questions through a robust student orientation (that the students have access to until the completion of the program)
  • Ideas for humanizing the online classroom and building community

By Dr. Melissa Kaulbach Dr. Kaulbach is currently the Sr. Director of Academic Services for Academic Partnerships and also serves as faculty at Sarasota University. She conducts faculty workshops for professional development on topics ranging from effective online pedagogy, instructional design, how to increase student engagement through robust online course design, and teaching online with technology. Dr. Kaulbach has been in the education industry for twenty four years. She has presented at numerous conferences and has served on university-wide committees Dr, Kaulbach served as the Chair for the 2012 Academic Partnerships Online Research Grant program. She is also the co-host of the Ed Tech Du Jour web show, which focuses on improving online instruction. Dr, Kaulbach earned her B.A. In Elementary Education & Music, her MAED in Instructional Leadership, and her EdD is in Educational Leadership.

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 The Art of Blogging: How to Connect, Interact, and Build Rapport with your Students

Tuesday September 17th, 3pm-4 pm  Hawaii Standard Time (HST). World Clock  Experience how to blog to build rapport by connecting and interacting with others. Participants will reflect on how they can blog to build rapport with their students. By Sue Waters Sue Waters an Australian based in Perth, is married with two kids. While her work as an aquaculture lecturer earned her the coolest job title, her passion is the use of technology to enhance student learning. Sue’s technology use has changed considerably since she was first introduced to it’s potential in 2000; from a LMS (WebCT) to Virtual Classrooms (Elluminate), mobile technologies (spyglasses, PDAs, iPods) and Web 2.0 (blogs, wikis etc). Her passion has led to a transition from aquaculture lecturer, to facilitating professional development workshops on elearning and web 2.0 technologies, to her current role writing on The Edublogger and as Edublogs‘ Support Manager. Sue’s personal blog is also well known and as a blogger she  stands for — practical application of technologies in education, and most importantly HELPING OTHERS learn how to use these technologies.

Week 2 (September 16 – 22)

Objective: Decide how you will “build rapport” with your distance learners.

Aloha and welcome to Week 2- Connect with your learnersPlease begin by reviewing the resources on how to connect with your learners.  Choose and explore topics that meet your needs and interests. Topics:

  • What the Best College Teachers Do.
  • Close the “distance” gap and build rapport.
  • What the Best Online Teachers Should Do
  • Five factors for building rapport.

Activities & WebinarPick and choose what you will do this week.


Webinar Sessions (all sessions will be recorded)

  1. Use Human Touch to Engage Online Students. By Dr. John Thompson. Full recording (opens in Blackboard Collaborate). Video recording
  2. So how do teachers close the “distance” gap and build rapport? By Dr. Melissa Kaulbach. Prezi PresentationFull recording (opens in Blackboard Collaborate). Video recording
  3. The Art of Blogging: How to Connect, Interact, and Build Rapport with your StudentsFull recording (opens in Blackboard Collaborate)
  4. Principles of Effective Online Teaching: Best Practices in Distance Education. By Dr. Larry Ragan.Full recording (opens in Blackboard Collaborate). Video recording.
  5. Weekly RoundupPresentation slides (PDF)Full recording (opens in Blackboard Collaborate). Video recording

How to Teach Online Flipboard Magazine

Here is a magazine view the blog posts for How to Teach online. Flipboard works great on iPad’s and android devices. You’ll need to install the app first.  http://flip.it/SVHIe

Online Interaction- Every challenge can make you stronger if you allow it.

Lin, Dyer and  Guo point out that when it comes to task-related concerns, online instructors are most anxious and apprehensive about the “balance of three types of interaction: content – student interaction, instructor – student interaction, and student – student interaction.” Moore and Kearsley … Continue reading

The Game of Thrones and Online Teaching

www.noobgalore.us

The Game of Thrones and Online Teaching

In todays Webinar, Ollie Dreon stated he just wrote a new blog post on The Game of Thrones and online teaching. Here is his blog post.

Lately, I’ve been getting caught up on watching the Game of Thrones.  The series tells the tales of a number of families that vie for the throne in a fictional land filled with dragons, giants and icy zombies.  At first glance, the series may seem unconnected to our present day realities.  Closer inspection, however, reveals… <more> 

Why We Teach Online Tuesday September 10th 12…

Why We Teach Online

Tuesday, September 10th, 12 pm-1 pm, Hawaii Standard Time (HST). World Clock .

The real promise of online education, experts say, is providing learning experiences that are more tailored to individual students than is possible in classrooms.  In this session Dr. Dreon will share some principles of Universal Design concepts and how they apply to online learning. He will also look at  national research on the effectiveness of online at meeting students’ educational needs .

By Dr. Oliver Dreon

Dr. Oliver Dreon is the director of the Center for Academic Excellence at Millersville University. Follow him on Twitter @ollied.

 

Week 1 (September 9-15)

Objective: Decide how you will apply the “fundamentals of online teaching” in your own teaching.

Aloha and welcome to Week 1. Please start with the fundamentals. Choose and explore topics that meet your needs and interests. Topics:

  • Evidence of why online teaching is important.
  • Substantive Interaction.
  • Where Do You Begin? The Nine steps to quality online learning.
  • Good Practice in Online Teaching.

 Activities & Webinar. Pick and choose what you will do this week.


Webinar Sessions (all sessions will be recorded)


We are currently working on a few issues with the blog feeds. Tech Support will be looking into the feed problem over the next few days. If your blog post does not appear on the Community Wall please login and post the link to the wall. Thank you for your patience.


How to Teach Online Flipboard Magazine

Here is a magazine view the blog posts for How to Teach online. Flipboard works great on iPad’s and android devices. You’ll need to install the app first.  http://flip.it/SVHIe

Week 0 Get Prepared

Welcome to How To Teach Online 2013, a massive, open, online course (MOOC). Here are some key details to help you get started this week, and prepared for next week. We look forward to connecting, learning, and building our community together. Your tomooc Facilitators


Week 0

  1. Get Prepared Here!
  2. Week 0 Activities 

Aloha Discussion
  1. What is your intention for this course (why are you here)?
  2. What issues do you think are important?
  3. How will contribute?
  4. How would you like to see community develop among participants?
  5. These types of courses are new for most people. In fact about 90% don’t even participate. How will you overcome the fear of learning in the open and the frustration of using new technology? How do you plan to courageously work through any setbacks, and not give up?

Webinar Session Recordings

How to Login and Post to the Community Wall
  1. Click on “Log in” at the top left corner.
  2. Your username and password will be the email address – BEFORE THE @ SIGN- you provided when you registered.
  3. After you login in, you will be in your Dashboard. This is where you can change your password, update your name, and upload an avatar/picture. Click on the Update Profile button to save.
  4. In the horizontal grey bar at the top, click on “How to Teach Online” to visit the community wall site.

We are currently working on a few issues with the Edublog blog feeds. Tech Support will be looking into the feed problem over the next few days. We are temporarily feeding those blogs through another service. Alternatively you can post a link to your blog on the Community Wall.  Thanks!

Week 0: Get Prepared

9/4 Note: We are currently having difficulties with Edublogs blogs feeding to this Edublog site :0). We are working on a solution. Thank you for your patience.

Welcome to How To Teach Online 2013, a massive, open, online course (MOOC). Here are some key details to help you get started this week, and prepared for next week. We look forward to connecting, learning, and building our community together.

Your tomooc Facilitators

Get Prepared Here!
Week 0 Activities 

Aloha Discussion
  1. What is your intention for this course (why are you here)?
  2. What issues do you think are important?
  3. How will contribute?
  4. How would you like to see community develop among participants?
  5. These types of courses are new for most people. In fact about 90% don’t even participate. How will you overcome the fear of learning in the open and the frustration of using new technology? How do you plan to courageously work through any setbacks, and not give up?
Webinar Session Reccordings

Aloha and Welcome to How To Teach Online!

Welcome to How To Teach Online 2013, a massive, open, online course (MOOC). Here are some key details to help you get started this week, and prepared for next week. We look forward to connecting, learning, and building our community together.

Your tomooc Facilitators

Week 0 Activities 
Aloha Discussion
  1. What is your intention for this course (why are you here)?
  2. What issues do you think are important?
  3. How will contribute?
  4. How would you like to see community develop among participants?
  5. These types of courses are new for most people. In fact about 90% don’t even participate. How will you overcome the fear of learning in the open and the frustration of using new technology? How do you plan to courageously work through any setbacks, and not give up?
Webinar Session Reccordings

Become part of a community

en.wikipedia.org -

How we spend our time on the Internet matters.  We can choose to waste our time doing meaningless clicking and taking.  Or we can choose to be a  part of communities that are meaningful to us. We can help them grow and thrive.  Seth Godin, in his blog post Part of a community…, points out,

“What can I contribute today,” might be the very best way to become part of a community. Relentless generosity brings us closer together.

The alternative? The masses of web surfers spending their time wasting their time, taking, clicking, scamming or being scammed.

When you think of the real communities you belong to, your family, your best friends, the tribes that matter… of course the decision is easy… Take or give?

How To Teach Online (#tomooc) is designed to help you learn to engage in an online learning community. Online learning communities develop through interaction among participants. Acknowledging, valuing, respecting and accommodating diversity as a combination of similarities and differences plays a central role in fostering and maintaining online learning communities.

You will learn how to read or watch, understand, and work with various forms of content, and other people, to create your own new understanding and knowledge. Your job isn’t to memorize a whole bunch of stuff. Rather, your job is to practice and use different tools to create artifacts. We will show you by giving examples. Watch what we do, then practice yourself.

Sign up now for “How To Teach Online”.


Filed under: tomooc

What makes you stand out

Sara Blakely has never taken a business class, and had zero experience with the product she created. Using the Internet, tenacious cold calling, and $5,000 in savings, she created Spanx, a $500 million dollar-a-year company, and revolutionized women’s undergarments (Sara Blakely, Spanx and the American Dream).

Her greatest inspiration was her father. At dinner each night he asked how she failed that day. Gradually her father re-framed her thinking about failure. The greatest gift she received from her father was not to be afraid of failure. This gift, along with her experience, cold call selling fax machines, taught her to keep going.  On Fareed Zakaria GPS, she said,

I had never taken a business class. I had never worked in fashion or retail. But I knew that I wanted to be self-employed. I had really been visualizing that. I had been manifesting that.  I was very clear with my intentions but I wanted an idea. And if the universe gave me the idea, I would take it and run with it and create it on my own and sell it, because I knew I could sell fax machines. I didn’t really like fax machines or, half the time, understand them.

But if I could come up with that idea that I was excited about, then I would not waste it.

She learned from her success, “If you don’t know how it’s done you’re going to do something different. That’s what makes you stand out”.

How can we learn like Sara and stand out? Begin by registering for How To Teach Online. Learning in this MOOC results from the activities you choose to undertake, and will be different for each person. You visit other people’s blogs, and create discussions of your own.

You will feel a bit disoriented at first. However, if you keep going, you will learn from your confusion and mistakes. Your active participation in this course will help you to acquire the skills needed to function in this type of course. If you stick with it, you learn to manage complexity within networked learning environments. You will have done something different. You will stand out.

Do something different! Register for How To Teach Online.


Filed under: tomooc

Growing personal confidence and freedom

,  in his blog post From Learning Outcomes to Personal Corpus tools, writes that our obsession with Learning Outcomes has become the basis for quality and assessment in education.  A Learning Outcome becomes a process of “what a student can do is ‘about’ something, codified by outcome criteria”.  Fear of failure to comply with learning outcomes requirements often leads to inauthentic activities. We need to focus less on the aboutness of learning and begin to help learners discover what is within themselves.

The business of learning outcomes… encourages a mentality with individuals summing up their knowledge with a tick-list of achievements, verified by assessment, but often not demonstrable outside the educational setting. Learning Outcomes have led teachers and learners to believe that ‘aboutness’ of education is what matters: having found the ‘evidence’, the ticked box indicates that the thing that the box is about has been acquired.

Understanding the topic of learning…is to demonstrate fluent patterns of behaviour which others can judge for themselves. Moreover, it is for each individual to find ways in which they can find their own stories and relate their stories to particular topics. The path of learning should be a path of growing personal confidence and freedom.

Where can teachers go to develop the skills, and gain the experience needed, to guide, question, and develop students in ways that relate to each learner’s interests?

Start by registering or How To Teach Online, a massive, open, online course (MOOC) that takes a broad view of teaching online. This type of course is called a ‘connectivist‘ course and is based on the following  types of activity.

  • Pick and Choose
    • You will have access to a wide variety of things to read, watch or play with. There will be a LOT of content associated with this course. You are NOT expected to read and watch everything. Instead, what you should do is PICK AND CHOOSE content that looks interesting to you and is appropriate for you. If it looks too complicated, don’t read it. If it looks boring, move on to the next item.
  • Remix and Repurpose
    • Once you’ve read or watched or listened to some content, your next step is to create something of your own.  Please don’t simply repeat what other people have said. Create something of your own. This is the hardest part. Remember that you are not starting from scratch. Nobody ever creates something from nothing. That’s why we call this section ‘repurpose’ instead of ‘create’. We want to emphasize that you are working with materials you read/watched/listened to. Your goal isn’t to memorize a whole bunch of stuff. Your goal is Practice USING TOOLS. Think of every bit of content you create not simply as content, but as practice using the tool. The content almost doesn’t even matter – what matters is that you apply the tool. This will seem awkward at first, as any tool does. But with practice you’ll become an accomplished creator and critic of ideas and knowledge. And that is the purpose of this course!
  • Share (feed forward)
    • We want you to share your work with other people in the course, and with the world. You don’t have to share. You can work completely in private, not showing anything to anybody. Sharing is and will always be YOUR CHOICE. Sharing in public is harder. People can see your mistakes. People can see you try things you’re not comfortable with. It’s hard, and it’s sometimes embarrassing.  But it’s better. You’ll try harder. You’ll think more about what you’re doing. You’ll get a greater reward – people will see what you’ve created and connect on it- sometimes critically- but often (much more often) with support, help and praise. People really appreciate it when you share. After all, what you’re doing when you share is to create material that other people can learn from. Your sharing creates more content for this course. People appreciate that, you will probably appreciate the content other people in the course share with you.

Sign up here for “How To Teach Online”.


Filed under: tomooc

Critical connections The connection economy is changing the…

Critical connections

The connection economy is changing the way we learn. The concrete classroom, shut off from the outside world, is an inadequate environment for connected learning.
We need to embrace the revolution of the internet by learning how to make critical connections. Critical connections are made when we are willing to think critically and commit to interacting in ways  that are truly open and honest.  Seth Godin asks,

Will I see you tomorrow?
There is no greater indicator of future behavior than the answer to this question.

Fly-by, drive-by, anonymous, see-you-sucker interactions are easy to start, easy to be disappointed by, hard to count on when it comes to civility or a career.

We work to create the alternative. Masks off, snarkiness set aside, committed to long haul. That’s the connection that the connection economy is built on.

How To Teach Online is an open access course—no fees are required to join and participate.  For this course to be successful we emphasize, and are are dependent upon, participant contributions and discussions as a means of exploring how to teach online. Critical connections are what what makes the course a success.  The course is based on three principles.

  1. Building community. How To Teach Online is designed to provide participants with an experience of engagement in an online learning community. Online learning communities develop through critical interaction among participants. Acknowledging, valuing, respecting and accommodating diversity as a combination of similarities and differences plays a central role in fostering and maintaining a learning community based on critical connections.
  2. Playful Learning. During How To Teach Online you are encouraged participate in playful engagement and make learning fun. Playful learning involves participants taking small risks, playing with ideas, keeping an open mind and making critical connections where they are not obvious. Participants are encouraged to express their creativity through developing their ability to challenge, question and explore.
  3. Reflection. A key principle underpinning How To Teach Online is the emphasis on reflection as a learning process. Critical reflection on your own learning helps you to take ownership of your learning process. Articulating your reflections makes your thinking available for comment and feedback.

How To Teach Online

Begins September 2nd, 2013.

Please pass this opportunity on to everyone who might be interested!


Filed under: tomooc

A FREE MOOC: How To Teach Online

by blog.post.edu

How To Teach Online” is a MOOC that takes a broad view of teaching online. Whether you are new to online teaching or want to improve your craft of teaching, “How To Teach Online” is a great place to share, connect, and learn from others around the world.

 Participate as you desire. Start and finish at any time, working through the workshop at a pace that fits your needs. Recommended weekly activities are offered, but participants can engage in the course at any level that their schedule or interests permit.

Check out our list of Guest speakers.

How To Teach Online start September 2nd. Register Now!


Filed under: tomooc

How To Teach Online

How To Teach Online” is a massive, open, online course (MOOC) that takes a broad view of teaching online. This five-week MOOC is for instructors of all experiences who teach online. Whether you are new to online teaching or want to improve your craft of teaching, “How To Teach Online” is a great place to share, connect, and learn from others around the world.

This is an open-access MOOC – no fees are required to join and participate. For this MOOC to be successful, we emphasize and are dependent upon, participant contributions and discussions as a means of exploring how to teach online. Your contributions are what makes the MOOC a success.

Topics:

Week 0: Get prepared! (Sept. 2-8)
Week 1: Start with the fundamentals. (Sept. 9-15)
Week 2: Connect with your learners. (Sept. 16-22)
Week 3: Connect learners with each other. (Sept. 23-29)
Week 4: Create a natural critical learning environment. (Sept. 30-Oct.6)
Week 5: Create activities and assessments. (Oct. 7-13)

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