ALOHA from rainy London My new blog is…

ALOHA from rainy London!

My new blog is in a POEM..

Taking into account the postings on the community wall about short attention spans and since I often think in lyrics and colour.

Please enjoy and thank you once again for a great week of materials from all participants and Tutors.

http://sineadyism.edublogs.org/2013/09/13/once-upon-a-time-in-an-online-learning-course-poetry-in-mooc-motion/

Getting started

Getting started with "How to Teach Online" with the University of Hawai'i.



About Me
I recently completed my PhD in Oceanography at the University of Hawai'i, Manoa.  I have a few years of classroom teaching experience, with the majority of my online classroom experience occurring as an undergraduate student.

Why This Workshop?
I enrolled in the "How to Teach Online" course because I am interested in developing my skills as an online instructor.  I am specifically interested in learning how to best design MOOCs, however, I would also like to become familiar with the techniques used by a variety of online instructors.

I know that there is a lot of resistance among faculty surrounding the quality of online courses, and I hope by becoming more versed in online education I will be able to build successful online courses in the future.

Overcoming Challenges
I have two main concerns with the workshop:
1) Making time to complete the work
- Just like everyone else, I have numerous, more pressing, commitments.  I plan to schedule blocks of time to devote the course so that I can both develop my teaching ability and contribute to our online community.
2) This is my first blog
- Like many of my fellow students, there will be some technology learning that needs to take place.

Better late than never? Week 0.

It has been 3 years since I finished my Ed Tech degree. Since that time I have been an administrator with limited chance to use what I had learned. I have no passion for being a principal, so I am looking around for the right opportunity as an online instructor, Instructional Designer, or as an Integration Specialist.
My intentions with this MOOC are to refresh those rusty skills and learn new ones. It is amazing how fast things have changed! Change itself is an issue I find important. Are things changing just because they can? Because it is expected? Or, is it a true improvement?
Coming from the k-12 world I understand another important issue is student safety. What should students have access to? What should be limited? In my part of rural Arizona parents and schools are concerned with blogging, students and teachers having too much contact in online situations. Just to mention a few.
I have a goal to contribute regularly and with great wisdom. We shall see, on both counts.
I have not been very involved with blogging, or networking with others in the e-learning field for that matter. I hope that will change, and I can become more comfortable and involved in the community and with other participants.
I have a goal to not be part of the 90% who don’t participate actively, but if I am I hope to learn quite a bit from the other 10%.


TOMOOC

I have registered in this course on “how to teach on line”. I have done some distance learning a long time back when the internet was not so prevelent and I hope to do the same after learning on this course

The entire technology of the web is a bit frightening but with patience I am sure I shall get around it

 


I need a good mini-lecture app or tool.

I am a relatively non-tech savy online instructor.  My first class was a cable course where students were supposed to watch a 45-minute lecture online, read instructions for essays online and then turn in essays and assignments via the internet.  It was awful, to say the least.  The lecturers had been prerecorded by another instructor many semesters prior, and the assignments weren’t even my own.  Because I was following someone else’s pre-designed course, I had to kind of follow along like a student. I’m going to be honest- I tried to watch the lectures.  They were exhausting.  They felt sloooooooooooooow, and since I couldn’t participate, they turned into a passive listening experience.  I usually started cooking or texting or painting my nails.  Usually cooking though.  I’d constantly tune out and then have to rewatch them looking for hints about the assignment.  After that experience, I knew that online lecturing was not the way to go.  

 

Nevertheless, I am auditory learner and I keep catching myself drawn to the videos over text when it comes to taking online classes.  Still, if the video is more than 3 minutes and starts off slow or resembles a power-point in any way, I’m out!  I may sound like some “over-stimulated” “tech-saturated” lazy-minded youngster with the attention-span of a hamster, but I’m not.  Give me a book and I’m satisfied sitting still for hours.  Put me on the internet and I want out as fast as possible.  I just like hearing things too.  

 

Thus, what I want, in order to make my online course more engaging for my auditory learners and my visual learners, is an app or a tool for recording short and sweet videos/teaching segments where I can highlight a concept that I really want my students to understand.  

I’ve never made a video in my life.  Help me?


Hello my name is @LeeBogner and I’m looking forward to taking #TOMOOC new online course how to teach online

My name is Lee Bogner, I am an adjunct professor of information systems and business analytics at Hofstra University in NY USA, where I teach Introduction to ECommerce as an online distance learning course.

I’ve been a CIO (chief information officer) and Digital Technologist at retail, media and tech companies where I’ve created and delivered online training, communications and community since 1996.

My intention is to learn from this course and my classmates to better my online instruction, and specifically by experiential and participative learning, and using best practices. Also I like to meet, and collaborate with, like-minded people from around the world. I believe engagement and participation are crucial to help remove the “distance” from distance learning.

I will contribute by communicating and collaborating with the class (people) as well as share learnings from my University online course which I just pushed live on Sept. 3. I would like to see “this” community develop naturally, perhaps with some “thought seeding” by the facilitators. I plan to participate and due to my background I see limited technical obstacles and I am open to assisting classmates and facilitators if and when needed.

I look forward to meeting you all!

Thank you!

LeeBogner

Reach @LeeBogner

LeeBognerHofstra@Gmail.com

Adjunct Instructor, IS and Business Analytics Dept. [new dept. name!]
Board Member, Zarb IT Executive Board of Visitors
Hofstra University
117 Weller Hall
Hempstead, New York
11549-1000
Google mail: LeeBognerHofstra@Gmail.com
Reach @LeeBogner on many Social networks and communities, including:
Twitter | LinkedIn | Google+  | Slideshare | LeeBogner.com | Hofstra U | St. John’s U | Skype | RebelMouse

WK0: GETTING MYSELF PREPARED

  1. What is your intention for this course (why are you here)? I'm here to learn about this approach to learning so that I can be more effective teaching online for my students. As I am by nature more constructivist leaning, the philosophical orientation of the cMOOC really resonates for me.
  2. What issues do you think are important? Collaboration, community, personalization, self-directed learning, creativity, challenging paradigms
  3. How will you contribute? Share any additional materials that I find, and, when I feel I have perspective to offer, share any thoughts that might contribute to the discussion. On a personal level, I am committed to making connections & documenting/reflecting on my experience through my blog.
  4. How would you like to see community develop among participants? Not sure. I'm thinking it will evolve organically, but guess I would like to see respectful interactions, constructive feedback so that we all feel encouraged/comfortable enough to participate, as well as, concise thoughtful postings as there will be so much material to engage.
  5. These types of courses are new for most people. In fact about 90% don’t even participate. How will you overcome the fear of learning in the open and the frustration of using new technology? How do you plan to courageously work through any setbacks, and not give up? I've been teaching technology for several years and so by now am fully used to the frustration it brings - I'm still here :0) I see this as a chance to play with some tools that I just havent had time to explore. My challenge is figuring out what tool or combination of tools work best for me in terms of capturing, organizing resources and documenting my learning process. I already feel that my fear of the open environment is subsiding - I just created an open public diigo group, About MOOCs, for this course. I'm challenged by the recognition of how stuck I am in a linear learning approach but open to confronting that. I'm intuitively drawn to the Chaotic domain, as described in Cormier's reference to Snowden's model, and agree this exploration of MOOCs fits best in this dimension, but am not yet used to working comfortably in it. 

One of the issues raised for reflection in…

One of the issues raised for reflection in this week’s activity was to describe a best teacher and a worst teacher ever. And when I think of school of my infancy and adolescence this brings no good memories.
University was an adult experience and something of my choice, so a different reality.
I’m a senior and my times of school go back to fascist times. I was a regular pupil, not at all problematic, but my emotions towards school are those of being imprisoned. My comfort zone was home.
I remember some of the teachers but I don’t regard any of them as mentors or model people that I particularly respected.
The interaction resumed to listen and be quiet. Speak when you are called – the 19th century authoritarian school.
At the time, genders were separate – schools for girls and schools for boys. No contact allowed. I had a friendly relationship with schoolfellows but didn’t kept contact with any of them aftering school.
As you can imagine, I didn’t like school. It was a repressive institution, and though I was not a rebellious girl I had a strong sense of injustice.
The education system, at the time, had primary schools separate from other levels and types of schools, with two main branches: (i) liceum and (ii) technical schools (commercial/industrial), which were linked t class strata.
In Portugal, we were much influenced by the French system and culture. After leaving the primary school with a final exam, I had to do a second national exam to enter «liceum» (very rational???). With several separate subjects, we had as foreign language French. Moral and Religion was also compulsory. In a catholic and fascist country anybody with a different religion was treated as an outcast. I had a schoolfellow who was a protestant and had required to be exempt from this class. The teacher humiliated her and persecuted her until she finally got permission to leave. Things like these were normal but for me unacceptable.
I’m very much in favour of democratic education, modern school movement and other free education alternatives inspired by A,S.Neill, Freinet, Ferrer Guardia, etc.

Getting started with online learning…

This format exploring the tools and resources that available through this course reminds me so much of a wonderful professor I had in grad school. He loved chaos and many minds coming together, bashing around, and finding enlightenment. I hope to apply some of his scope to the online work I put together. I’m already grateful to this course for helping me find this little gem of a tool called PowToon. Here is my first foray into video creation.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kjc83A_95B4

 


Proper English Will Save Us!

Proper English Will Save Us!

September 6, 2013 by  · No Comments · tomooc

I have been reading a lot of blogs lately.  Yes, for the MOOC to be inspired to write my own, but also via LinkedIn, where everything seems to link to something else.  I don’t have a lot of rules that determine what blogs I read.  They need to either be relevant to my work or of interest to me personally or professionally.  But I do expect that they be well-written and free of errors. More…

Introduction


Hello, my name is Hye Ri Joo. I teach Korean language at Leeward Community College. I am interested in developing a MOOC for Korean language in the future. Last year, I took an online course about e-learning from UH Manoa and would like to continue learning about e-learning from this workshop. A language MOOC would be different from MOOCs for other regular subjects. I would like to come up with a MOOC for language learning.

Why Am I Here?

I want to learn new skills. I have an online local news source business, but I also want to create a course useful for folks in my field—journalism. I love learning new things, and I love challenges. This seemed like a wonderful thing to challenge my aging brain. I hope I'm not the only "old" lady here - of an age when I SHOULD be retired, but am having too much fun with my business.

Resistance really is futile – only our eMedia Center could get me to blog

Hi everyone, my name is Tracie Losch and I want learn more about facilitating interaction online.  Online classes can be so impersonal, how do we make it more personal for students while maintaining the integrity of the course content?

One of the issues I am experiencing is too many different options for interaction with students [I needed to get a special APP just to keep the passwords straight].  Is there a way to connect all these things so I donʻt have to re-type the same comment X times?

Another issue I come across is that students donʻt always have access to these tools, or know how to use them.  Thus, I have to take time out of instruction to teach them the technical aspects.

Best and Worst

I remember teachers who seemed genuinely interested in my educational well-being and challenged me to work hard and that I could trust.  Based on my observations:

  1. DO make sure students know what is expected of them
  2. DO admit it if you don’t know something
  3. DO be firm yet compassionate when necessary
  4. DO have a sense of humor
  1. DON’T surprise students (warn them that you will be giving pop quizzes sometime…during the semester)
  2. DON’T quote dismal passing rates
  3. DON’T lose your sense of humor
  4. DON’T forget what is was like to be a student

I find this kind of blogging scary, knowing that everyone will be reading my thoughts, evaluating and yes, even judging is nerve-wracking.  I resisted Facebook, Twitter and all the other social media APPs so far.  I hope that this experience will help me work through those fears – who knows, soon you wonʻt be able to shut me up.

I have been teaching online for 3 years and can also share some of my experiences and hope they can help others.

 

I’m an experienced online learner and teacher but…

I’m an experienced online learner and teacher, but seem to be having difficulty understanding WHAT to do in this course so far. Anyone feeling a little lost? Are we supposed to post here? On our individual blogs? Where does the interaction take place? When we find out how to comment on others’ blogs? Do we need a gmail address (someone mentioned Google+)? It looked like things were organized until I started trying to DO them.

Hello from downunder

This is the first week of the How to Teach online MOOC and this is my introduction to my fellow learners….

I have been teaching online for a few years (in the Vocational education sector and now in the higher education sector) and I am here to glean new and share ideas with fellow educators.

7 principles for good practoce online by Giulia Forsythe CC-BY-NC=SA

Online teaching and learning issues that I think are important are:  setting the climate, supporting discourse, encouraging interaction and sharing of ideas, creating authentic contexts and tasks where students can produce real-world artifacts that are useful in the world outside the learning environment.

At this early stage I’m not sure how the course will unfold, but some of the ways I think I can contribute are:  responding on forums or in my blog, connecting with others by commenting on their blogs and creating spaces for everyone to share resources. E.G.  I am happy to start a Diigo library where everyone can post links to educational resources if people are interested.

I hope the community is friendly and supportive. I have participated in MOOCS previously and on some occasions some people just seemed to be there to argue and abuse others. I hope this is not the case in this course :) I have also made many online friends in previous cases, some I have not met in person yet, but hope to one day. I hope this may be the case this time as well.

I am an advocate of open learning and encourage my students to publish their work on the open web, so I don’t fear of open online learning. You can find links to my e-courses and research information on my website at: www.elearnopen.biz. Discovering new technologies is my passion. I don’t fear set-backs or frustrations, these are all part of the learning process and I welcome the challenges. As part of my research I have developed a wiki called the Technology Toolbox for Educators. This is a site where I curate information about technologies and provide examples about how technology can used in the classroom to support student learning. Primarily as cognitive tools used by students to learn and demonstrate their understanding.  One of the main challenges when working with new technology is making the time to explore and experiment with them. Courses like these help me “make the time” to explore and play.

I am looking forward to connecting and sharing ideas with people :)


Just started the class

Today, I started taking the How to Teach Online course.  A bit of catching up to do since the actual course started on Monday.  I’ve done a little bit of Blackboard and blogging, but I can already tell that this class will hold a lot of new experience for me and I am very excited, as well as a bit nervous.

So, here’s my Aloha Discussion.

I’m here because I would like to be an online teacher someday.  I currently teach part time in traditional classrooms and I love it.  But recently I have taken several MOOCs and it really opened up my eyes to what these courses can do.  I teach Biology, so I am especially interested in finding out how to get the hands-on component of science classes (such as lab experiments etc)  online.  I am hoping that I can use this class to build my online tools for my future classes, and that will motivate me to keep participating in the class.    For a beginner, it’s so overwhelming to face all these new technology, but it was encouraging to hear Greg say “Pick and Choose”.  Look forward to do my best to be a part of the online community and to see what others have to offer!

Week 0 Get Prepared

Welcome to How To Teach Online 2013, a massive, open, online course (MOOC). Here are some key details to help you get started this week, and prepared for next week. We look forward to connecting, learning, and building our community together. Your tomooc Facilitators


Week 0

  1. Get Prepared Here!
  2. Week 0 Activities 

Aloha Discussion
  1. What is your intention for this course (why are you here)?
  2. What issues do you think are important?
  3. How will contribute?
  4. How would you like to see community develop among participants?
  5. These types of courses are new for most people. In fact about 90% don’t even participate. How will you overcome the fear of learning in the open and the frustration of using new technology? How do you plan to courageously work through any setbacks, and not give up?

Webinar Session Recordings

How to Login and Post to the Community Wall
  1. Click on “Log in” at the top left corner.
  2. Your username and password will be the email address – BEFORE THE @ SIGN- you provided when you registered.
  3. After you login in, you will be in your Dashboard. This is where you can change your password, update your name, and upload an avatar/picture. Click on the Update Profile button to save.
  4. In the horizontal grey bar at the top, click on “How to Teach Online” to visit the community wall site.

We are currently working on a few issues with the Edublog blog feeds. Tech Support will be looking into the feed problem over the next few days. We are temporarily feeding those blogs through another service. Alternatively you can post a link to your blog on the Community Wall.  Thanks!

How to Teach Online – Week 0

Not sure if I did the Category thing right, so we’ll see.

Why am I here? This is my first MOOC so I’m curious to experience it. I work for an organization that offers instructor-led online courses. Students in a course are assigned to groups and have an instructor. Work is mostly done asynchronously, but according to a schedule. Most of the interaction between participants and with the instructor is via the class discussion boards. I’d like to see if there is anything in this MOOC that I can use to make our courses better.

What issues do I think are important? Getting people to interact online. Many complain that they feel isolated, but getting them to post to discussions, including reviewing and commenting on other posts is difficult. Also, I’m interested in learning more about how to use things like Twitter in courses as well as learning what some of the following are and how to use: Evernote, Socrative, Poll Everywhere, Schoology.

How will you contribute? I’m still trying to figure out the site (now I know how confused our students feel the first time they login our course site –lol!). If this posting works, I’ll continue to contribute that way. If there are other tools we can use to contribute I’ll try that as well as I learn more. Mostly, I’ll try to step outside of my comfort zone and share my experiences while also learning from others.

How would you like to see the community develop? Really not sure about this. I think that part of my experience will be just seeing how things evolve.


And now for the answers to the most pressing questions for the week 0 Aloha discussion…

Aloha Discussion
  1. What is your intention for this course (why are you here)?
    My intention... is to participate in my very first mooc experience, make some new connections through the virtual classroom, discover new ideas about online teaching through the conversations and assignments, and have some fun while doing all of that!  Also, I really like to learn new things and this satisfies my craving for new knowledge in a constructive manner.
  2. What issues do you think are important?
    As in any classroom, whether online or face-to-face, the most pressing issues are interactivity for students and application of what they are to learn.  Of course, it is always important to know what students should learn, identify and develop how they will learn and then assess the learning so that is on the list too, but just not at the top of my personal list.
  3. How will contribute?
    I plan to contribute by participating as much as possible in the blogs and in my own personal research reviewing other websites and published literature (whether print or online) relating to online learning and the psychology of learning.  And I'm hoping to not only be a sponge but actually have something of substance to say now and then to help others!
  4. How would you like to see community develop among participants?
    Oooo - what a great question!  And my answer is I really don't know.  Perhaps some group work now and then via synchronous and asynchronous tools or based on subjects of interest might be a couple of ways to develop the community.  What this mooc has already started is the synchronous webinar-type of presentations and once the participants get over initial shyness, I'm hoping we will be a lively and chatty group!
  5. These types of courses are new for most people. In fact about 90% don’t even participate. How will you overcome the fear of learning in the open and the frustration of using new technology? How do you plan to courageously work through any setbacks, and not give up?
    Again, another great observation and prompt.  For myself, I'm fairly confident that using new technology will not be too frustrating since I work in the online world daily.  As for learning in the open, I will follow my own general advice and say that whatever I put out in the open should be something I don't mind eating later (in case I need to eat my words).  My best guess about setbacks is that these will mainly be in the form of time allotted to accomplish tasks.  Life does not seem to get easier or less busy as I age so TIME will be the greatest hurdle.  With that thought in mind, I'm going to do some planning, list the items that need to be accomplished, schedule some time to get work and research completed and then re-evaluate and jump back in when there are the inevitable interruptions!

Why I’m here!

Actually having to write down my thoughts rather than just thinking them in my head was a useful activity. Reflecting (written) is something I get my students to do regulary, but I’ve just realised that I’d also benefit from doing this more often – and that’s why I’ve now started to blog! What is your [...]

Aloha Discussion I have been teaching online &…

Aloha Discussion:

I have been teaching online & hybrid courses for a few years and here is always so much to learn. The more I know, the more I realize how little I know. Besides attending workshops and webinars, I find that sharing tips and techniques with other educators is very beneficial.

I participated in the iFacilitate workshop last year and you folks at Leeward CC were great teachers! So I am here for an encore. Once again, I am seeking ideas and techniques to engage students, connect with them and motivate them to connect with each other.

My contribution will hopefully be activities that I had tried that were successful (or not).

Looking forward to spending the next few weeks with tomooc~

How to Teach Online MOOC

I just signed up for LCC's "Teaching Online" MOOC, and this will be my second foray into the world of MOOCs. My first MOOC was one through Coursera, in a Geography MOOC by Penn. State.  While I found the course material interesting, I had a hard time setting aside time for the course and ultimately didn't finish it in time.  Despite this, I still plan to finish the course.  I'm hoping that this MOOC will be a different experience for me, as this will be motivated by work rather than personally.  I have studied Educational Technology for the last 6 years, but I'm hoping that this MOOC will help me brush up on the latest technologies, research findings, and trends.

In the past I've been more of a lurker in terms of blogging or participating in discussion boards, but I hope to more active in the future.  I think being more active will hopefully improve my retention of the course material, and develop community with fellow participants.  By participating and commenting on others blogs, as well as whatever else is posted, I think is a great way for teachers and students to interact.  Nothing is more frustrating when you asked to post but no one comments.  It almost makes the exercise feel pointless.

DOs and DONT's for Teaching (Online and otherwise)

  • DO
    • Have clear instructions and expectations
    • Participate in class discussions
    • Offer positive and constructive feecback
    • Remind students of expectations
  • DON'T
    • Be a talking head, give students the opportunity to learn a little more about you
    • Post assignments and readings willy nilly.  Be clear at the beginning where everything will be posted
    • Expect all learners to come in with the same background.  If it is technology related, poll participants first to get a consensus, and if backgrounds are diverse, split up instruction so that people can pick what best fits their needs
    • be rigid.  Like teaching F2F, things can change and teachers and students need to be flexible.

Things I've learned this week:

  • Videos can be effective when they are engaging, like this week's video.

My first achievement


Although I'm sorry about missing last night's webinar, because somehow I didn't know about it, I did figure out today how to follow people, so Norene and Jenn I think I'm following you.

I hope somebody somehow will soon discover me, because I don't know how to "get out there: Hello! It's me, why doesn't anyone see me?"

Mary Alice

Hello from Big Island

Well, I’m just getting a feel for how to post blogs and such, so please forgive me if this is boring.

Today we taught nursing students how to take vital signs-temperature, pulse, respiration rate, blood pressure, etc, how to listen to lungs, oxygen delivery devices.  They are just starting out.

BTW, aloha Tanya, noticed you were on this course too!


Aloha and Introductions

Aloha Discussion:
1. What is your intention for this course (why are you here)?
I know nothing about teaching online and can barely figure out how to do this blog—or if this blog is even “linked” to the right place. I figure I have to dip my toes in the water at some point. I am hopelessly behind on social media and the uses of it and technology in the classroom and want to learn. I have taught no online classes so far but, pending my success at this class, might in the future.

2. What issues do you think are important?
For someone as hopelessly inept at the online world as me (no facebook!), I think technical issues of “how” are important. How do I use this site? How does managing an online class work? How do I know when there are new posts? How do I access them? How do I incorporate blackboard collaborate?

3. How will you contribute?
I can certainly contribute a lot of questions and enthusiasm! Hopefully I can contribute knowledge of pedagogy or working with students (“classroom” management)–the online management could be a whole new world.

4. How would you like to see community develop among participants?
People are the best resources and I would love to see a feasible, easy way to utilize that awesome resource within this community. I don’t know how to navigate this community right now and find the people who are interested in similar topics to me and I don’t know how to find the “seasoned” professionals and online teaching and to extract their wisdom, so I would like to the community develop pathways between us.

5. These types of courses are new for most people. In fact about 90% don’t even participate. How will you overcome the fear of learning in the open and the frustration of using new technology? How do you plan to courageously work through any setbacks, and not give up?

Well, I hope no one is judging here and that we all have the understanding that we came here to learn, share, give and be a community. That understanding certainly alleviates most apprehension. I am fearful of new technology, but have the will and desire to learn more and that should compensate. Intrinsic motivation is going to be a big key!


Working in the Open

In the introduction to for Week 0, Gregg Walker discussed the nature of the #toMooc and the modes of participation acceptable for the participants. I found his phrase, "working in the open" to be intriguing. I have added a page, "Working In The Open" where I will discuss the concept of unfiltered interaction as a learning model. Please visit the page to read my thoughts. I look forward to your comments.

Aloha!

I’m here, but it took me about 30 minutes to find my way. Too many directions to follow, so little time. I suppose that’s why we have the whole week to do it. Hooray for that.
Glad to be here, though.
I maintained online employment overseas while completing my Masters Program in the tail end of the 20th century. I believe online teaching is the way to go.

I am the Passenger

Image

  • What is your intention for this course (why are you here)?

I am an Ed.D student interested in doing a MOOC-based thesis. I am also interested in online education generally.

  • What issues do you think are important?

I am interested in front and back-end concerns with MOOCs. Instructional design is of particular interest, but also student experience, engagement, and success.

  • How will you contribute?

Probably by blogging and tweeting… but I look forward to the challenge of creating other kinds of media artifacts which reflect learning.

  • How would you like to see community develop among participants?

Organically and widely… I am interested in finding out how Garrison’s (2001) Community of Inquiry framework might apply to MOOCs.

  • These types of courses are new for most people. In fact about 90% don’t even participate. How will you overcome the fear of learning in the open and the frustration of using new technology? How do you plan to courageously work through any setbacks, and not give up?

The only hold-ups I can anticipate are work-related, or to do with my kids. I am a fairly self-motivated person. Personal issues / lack of time are more likely to curtail my involvement than any  problems with tech. And if those personal holdups arise, I am obliged to address them… possibly at the risk of not finishing this course.


Hello Everyone Since I seem to be having…

Hello Everyone,

Since I seem to be having trouble connecting my blog, I will post here instead. My name is Sara and I am the Online Coordinator at Allen Community College. While I am not currently teaching online, I have in the past and have enjoyed it. I am hoping that this course will provide me with some ideas that I can use should I teach online again in the future. In the meantime, I hope to take what I learn here and share it with the teachers I work with so that they can in turn improve their online courses.

In addition to gaining new ideas, I am interested in learning more about the MOOC experience. This is certainly a learning experience. This is my first MOOC and honestly right now it’s a little intimidating. I’m learning so much already as I have not previously blogged, used Twitter, or Google + before. Please forgive me for any slip-ups as I stumble my way through this. My blog address is: http://saradreisbach.edublogs.org.

The important issue I hope to see addressed is student engagement. It becomes difficult to get students to open up and be trusting in an online environment, but without doing so, they don’t seem to become fully engaged in the class. I hope to contribute by bringing unique insights and a wealth of experience to this course. I hope that by working together we can form a team and even maybe some long term working relationships that can help each of us.

Addressing Questions

Hello Everyone,

My name is Sara and I am the Online Coordinator at Allen Community College.  While I am not currently teaching online, I have in the past and have enjoyed it. I am hoping that this course will provide me with some ideas that I can use should I teach online again in the future.  In the meantime, I hope to take what I learn here and share it with the teachers I work with so that they can in turn improve their online courses.

In addition to gaining new ideas, I am interested in learning more about the MOOC experience.  This is my first MOOC and honestly right now it’s a little intimidating.  I’m learning so much already as I have not previously blogged, used Twitter, or Google + before.  Please forgive me for any slip-ups as I stumble my way through this.  My blog address is:  http://saradreisbach.edublogs.org.

 

Aloha Discussion Post am I posting in the…

Aloha Discussion Post (am I posting in the right area?)

What is your intention for this course (why are you here)?

I teach online for Hawaii Pacific University. While I think my course is a good one, there are things I would like to improve. Hopefully I can share what has worked for me with other participants, and they can do the same.

What issues do you think are important?

With respect to online teaching, I think creating true engagement between students is important. I think the more technology can be integrated to create a familiar environment for students the better. And as always, creating a way in which students can become better learners (rather than simply rewarding the folks who came with more resources) is critical.

How will contribute?

I hope to engage with fellow students through commenting and blogging.

How would you like to see community develop among participants?

I hope that we can all help one another become better online educators through fully engaging.

These types of courses are new for most people. In fact about 90% don’t even participate. How will you overcome the fear of learning in the open and the frustration of using new technology? How do you plan to courageously work through any setbacks, and not give up?

One thing I was taught is that part of using technology is having technological challenges. There will always be glitches- it’s just part of the process. Rather than be frustrated, it’s an exercise in troubleshooting and should be expected.

Here we go!

Hello! My name is Jenn and this blog is part of my participation in a massive online learning course (mooc) offered through Leeward Community College. The focus of the course is “How to Teach Online”, as so far I feel a bit like how I imagine the students in my online course feel when the course starts- a little overwhelmed, behind, and struggling to carve out space to truly engage! My family just moved from Oahu to Santa Barbara, and since our internet was just connected yesterday I should be on my way to full participation.

Currently I am a PhD candidate in Geography at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. I am also the instructor of record for an Introduction to Human Geography course at Hawaii Pacific University. I teach either one or two sections per semester, and usually a smaller section during the summer. I am always interested in how to improve my course- hence taking this class.

I have some aspects of my course that I would like to improve, and I am interested in learning from my classmates about how to address concerns specific to online teaching. I also hope to become familiar with tools that will enable more engagement with my students, such as Blackboard Collaborate. Overall I am looking forward to learning from and sharing with all of you.

Week 0: Get Prepared

9/4 Note: We are currently having difficulties with Edublogs blogs feeding to this Edublog site :0). We are working on a solution. Thank you for your patience.

Welcome to How To Teach Online 2013, a massive, open, online course (MOOC). Here are some key details to help you get started this week, and prepared for next week. We look forward to connecting, learning, and building our community together.

Your tomooc Facilitators

Get Prepared Here!
Week 0 Activities 

Aloha Discussion
  1. What is your intention for this course (why are you here)?
  2. What issues do you think are important?
  3. How will contribute?
  4. How would you like to see community develop among participants?
  5. These types of courses are new for most people. In fact about 90% don’t even participate. How will you overcome the fear of learning in the open and the frustration of using new technology? How do you plan to courageously work through any setbacks, and not give up?
Webinar Session Reccordings

Why this MOOC?

Let me start by saying my first intent was to research, or more appropriately, scavenge, ideas to use when teaching faculty in my institution how to teach online.  I am curious about the selection of topics and their relative importance.   How will the facilitators (how will I!) manage the overload of available information in order that the content becomes personally meaningful to each participant?  I’ve come to find a few more reasons why this fits my groove.  As a new online instructor, I wish to be intentional in my interaction with my students.

Community is important in the online environment, and I hope to get to know some of the 270 participants in this MOOC through reading, reflecting and commenting on each other’s blogs. It’s also important to understand factors affecting motivation. What kills student motivation? Is it hesitating due to lack of confidence and then falling so far behind it’s impossible to catch back up? That’s one idea, at least. How does this factor impact the course design, or currently, how I teach my course?

Greg Walker or Sue Waters mentioned in tonight’s webinar that one of the biggest challenges is getting participants to comment on each other’s blogs/ideas. I plan to develop my skill in this area, and as a result stimulate a healthy discussion. I won’t be able to keep up with everyone, but I can do something.

I’m not used to being so public with my ideas, so it makes sense that I am somewhat reluctant. I have a feeling the synchronous Collaborate sessions are really important to reduce the distance I might otherwise feel in the MOOC venue. I hadn’t realized how many ideas I could come up with to blog about until I was invited to share them in the webinar!  Thanks again to tonight’s webinar hosts for building our confidence and excitement in the process.  I look forward to your comments!


Getting started

I missed the first session tonight due to the time change but I did have a quick look at the resources pages and I am eager to get going with the actual course.  I appreciated the six categories of MOOC participants since I can appreciate each of the categories.  I am hoping to be an active participant in this course - heck I even have a blog started.