Webinars

Table List of Webinar Recordings


Week 0: Get prepared! (Sept. 2-8)


How to Teach Online Orientation

Orientation session with your course Facilitators Brent Hirata, Rachael Inake and Greg Walker.

by sharyn morrow
Introduction to blogging and what you really need to know to get started

In this session Sue Waters, the editor of Edublogs, will introduce blogging, and tell you what you really need to know about blogging to get the most out of How to Teach Online  (TOMOOC).

By Sue Waters

Sue Waters an Australian based in Perth, is married with two kids. While her work as an aquaculture lecturer earned her the coolest job title, her passion is the use of technology to enhance student learning. Sue’s technology use has changed considerably since she was first introduced to it’s potential in 2000; from a LMS (WebCT) to Virtual Classrooms (Elluminate), mobile technologies (spyglasses, PDAs, iPods) and Web 2.0 (blogs, wikis etc).

Her passion has led to a transition from aquaculture lecturer, to facilitating professional development workshops on elearning and web 2.0 technologies, to her current role writing on The Edublogger and as Edublogs‘ Support Manager. Sue’s personal blog is also well known and as a blogger she  stands for — practical application of technologies in education, and most importantly HELPING OTHERS learn how to use these technologies.


Week 1: Start with the fundamentals (Sept. 9-15)


Similarities and Differences between MOOCs and Credit Online Courses

The recent hype around MOOCs would suggest that online learning has just been discovered. However, we now have more than 20 years experience of delivering credit online courses. There are now almost 32 million higher education online course enrollments in credit courses the USA, and one million in Canada. Some institutions are getting 85-90% completion rates for their credit online courses, with comparable performance to their classroom-based courses. As a result, a great deal is already known about what works – and what doesn’t – in teaching online. This session looks at which of these lessons can transfer to the design of MOOCs and which can’t.

 By Tony Bates

Dr. Tony Bates is the author of eleven books in the field of online learning and distance education. He has provided consulting services specializing in training in the planning and management of online learning and distance education, working with over 40 organizations in 25 countries. Tony is a Research Associate with Contact North | Contact Nord, Ontario’s Distance Education & Training Network. – See more at:http://www.tonybates.ca/#sthash.eX4AWUN3.dpuf

  • Full recording (opens in Blackboard Collaborate) (Note: Please advance the marker on the player control bar at the bottom, to about 1:40:00 indicated by the first | mark in Blackboard Collaborate.)
  • Video recording (edited version)
Why we Teach Online

The real promise of online education, experts say, is providing learning experiences that are more tailored to individual students than is possible in classrooms.  In this session Dr. Dreon will share some principles of Universal Design concepts and how they apply to online learning. He will also look at  national research on the effectiveness of online at meeting students’ educational needs .

By Dr. Oliver Dreon

Dr. Oliver Dreon is the director of the Center for Academic Excellence at Millersville University. Follow him on Twitter @ollied.

Weekly Roundup

Join our session of highlights from the week.

 

Week 2: Connect with your learners (Sept 16-22)


Use Human Touch to Engage Online Students

Online instructors first need to be engaged if they want their students engaged. Learn how “human touch” serves to get everyone engaged. Human touch is really all about creating and maintaining relationships. When students sense a trusting, caring relationship on the part of their instructor, students begin to perceive that their online experience is as much about them, or even more so, than the curriculum, projects, and test results. Students feel that their instructor is trying to establish a warm, supportive relationship, their sense of belonging and engagement increases. That’s just human nature.

By Dr. John Thompson 

Dr. John Thompson is Associate Professor Emeritus at Buffalo State College. Although retired, Thompson continues teaching 100% online college courses for several higher education institutions, and has taught over 100 online courses since 2000. He also operates his own  training and consulting business – Global Learning Institute, Inc.

 

So how do teachers close the “distance” gap and build rapport?

Discussion on

  •  the importance of intro videos (can be simple….recorded with an iPhone or iPad) and provide 10 tips to recording to set the students up for success
  • Importance of responding to emails within 24 hours and tips for managing emails and diminishing the amount of technical questions through a robust student orientation (that the students have access to until the completion of the program)
  • Ideas for humanizing the online classroom and building community
Suggested Activity:   Record a sample intro video and and upload to your blog for peer review.

By Dr. Melissa Kaulbach 

Dr. Kaulbach is currently the Sr. Director of Academic Services for Academic Partnerships and also serves as faculty at Sarasota University. She conducts faculty workshops for professional development on topics ranging from effective online pedagogy, instructional design, how to increase student engagement through robust online course design, and teaching online with technology.

Dr. Kaulbach has been in the education industry for twenty four years. She has presented at numerous conferences and has served on university-wide committees Dr, Kaulbach served as the Chair for the 2012 Academic Partnerships Online Research Grant program. She is also the co-host of the Ed Tech Du Jour web show, which focuses on improving online instruction. Dr, Kaulbach earned her B.A. In Elementary Education & Music, her MAED in Instructional Leadership, and her EdD is in Educational Leadership.

 

 The Art of Blogging: How to Connect, Interact, and Build Rapport with your Students

Experience how to blog to build rapport by connecting and interacting with others. Participants will reflect on how they can blog to build rapport with their students.

By Sue Waters

Sue Waters an Australian based in Perth, is married with two kids. While her work as an aquaculture lecturer earned her the coolest job title, her passion is the use of technology to enhance student learning. Sue’s technology use has changed considerably since she was first introduced to it’s potential in 2000; from a LMS (WebCT) to Virtual Classrooms (Elluminate), mobile technologies (spyglasses, PDAs, iPods) and Web 2.0 (blogs, wikis etc).

Her passion has led to a transition from aquaculture lecturer, to facilitating professional development workshops on elearning and web 2.0 technologies, to her current role writing on The Edublogger and as Edublogs‘ Support Manager. Sue’s personal blog is also well known and as a blogger she  stands for — practical application of technologies in education, and most importantly HELPING OTHERS learn how to use these technologies.

Principles of Effective Online Teaching: Best Practices in Distance Education

Teaching online for the first time is a little like trying to drive a car in a foreign country. You know how to drive, just like you know how to teach, but it sure is hard to get the hang of driving on the left side of the road … you’re not quite sure how far a kilometer is … and darn it if those road signs aren’t all in Japanese.

By Dr. Larry Ragan

Dr. Lawrence C. Ragan has played a leadership role in the development of Penn State’s World Campus since the start of the initiative in 1998 serving as the Director of Instructional Design and Development, Director of Faculty Development, and most recently appointed as Co-Director of the Center for Online Innovation in Learning. Dr. Ragan presents internationally on the topics quality assurance online, instructional design, multimedia integration, faculty development programming, and instructional design for distance and blended education.


Weekly Roundup

Join our session of highlights from the week.

 

How to make discussion boards effective learning tools
  • Examples of exemplary, mediocre, and poorly written post.
  • Tips for constructive guiding questions.
  • Tips for managing discussion board responses

By Dr. Heather Farmakis

Heather Farmakis, Ph.D. has extensive experience in professional development, distance learning, and online instructional design both in K-12 and higher education. She has presented at national and state conferences on professional development and online learning and recently published her ebook, iLearn: Tips and Tricks for Online Learners for students new to online learning.

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Weekly Roundup

Join our session of highlights from the week.

 

Week 4: Create a natural critical learning environment. (Sept. 30-Oct.6)


Objective: Decide how you create a “natural critical learning environment” in your online courses.

Please begin by reading and reviewing the topic Create a natural critical learning environment.


 Blackboard Collaborate Webinar Sessions

How to Promote Critical Thinking in the Online Classroom

Overview:  The webinar will comprise a 15 to 20 minute presentation on the fundamentals of presence in the online classroom, with a focus on strategies that promote critical thinking. Power point slides will accompany the presentation, and can be made available to participants. Questions from participants will be encouraged.

Webinar Description:Strategies for promoting critical thinking among online students are shared and discussed in this Webinar. Participants will identify the three core principles needed to create an online presence—the foundation of promoting deep and meaningful learning for online students. This interactive session will provide opportunity for discussion, and participants will leave with ideas and tactics for creating a strategy that promotes critical thinking in their own online classroom.

By Debbie Morrison

Debbie Morrison is an instructional designer and educator with ten years experience in creating meaningful, rich learning outcomes in higher education and business settings. Debbie’s work focuses on online instructional design and education, including experience as the Lead Curriculum Developer, Online Programs at a four-year university. She currently works as an independent instructional designer, and collaborates with a variety of organizations to develop effective online programs. She writes and blogs about online education.

Engaging Students in Taking Ownership of Content Through Thinking…

A key insight into content (and into thinking) is that all content represents a distinctive mode of thinking. Math becomes intelligible as one learns to think mathematically. Biology becomes intelligible as one learns to think biologically. History becomes intelligible as one learns to think historically. This is true because all subjects are: generated by thinking, organized by thinking, analyzed by thinking, synthesized by thinking, expressed by thinking, evaluated by thinking, restructured by thinking, maintained by thinking, transformed by thinking, LEARNED by thinking, UNDERSTOOD by thinking, APPLIED by thinking. If you try to take the thinking out of content, you have nothing, literally nothing, remaining. Learning to think within a unique system of meanings is the key to learning any content whatsoever. This session, in other words, explores the intimate, indeed the inseparable relationship between content and thinking.

By Dr. Linda Elder

Dr. Linda Elder is an educational psychologist and a prominent authority on critical thinking. She is President of the Foundation for Critical Thinking and Executive Director of the Center for Critical Thinking. Dr. Elder has taught psychology and critical thinking at the college level and has given presentations to more than 20,000 educators at all levels. She has co-authored four books, including Critical Thinking: Tools for Taking Charge of Your Learning and Your Life, Critical Thinking: Tools for Taking Charge of Your Professional and Personal Life and Twenty-Five Days to Better Thinking and Better Living. She has co-authored eighteen thinker’s guides on critical thinking and co-authors a quarterly column on critical thinking in the Journal of Developmental Education.

Dr. Elder has also developed an original stage theory of critical thinking development.  Concerned with understanding and illuminating the relationship between thinking and affect, and the barriers to critical thinking, Dr. Elder has placed these issues at the center of her thinking and her work.

With experience in both administration and the classroom, Dr. Elder understands firsthand the problems facing educators. She is a dynamic presenter who reaches her audience on a person-to person level.

 

Weekly Roundup

Join our session of highlights from the week.

Weekly Roundup

Join our session of highlights from the week.


Week 5 – Create Activities (Oct 7 – Oct 13)


Blackboard Collaborate Webinar Sessions

 

Designing productive tasks in authentic learning environments

There is no more important pedagogical role for teachers than the design of learning tasks and assessment. An authentic learning approach enables educators to design tasks and assessments that are authentic because they are ‘cognitively real’, and they focus on students collaboratively creating genuine products that are polished and professional. Authentic learning can be very challenging to design because of this need to create such all-encompassing tasks that effectively form the basis of a whole topic or unit of study. In this presentation, I will focus on the importance of creating a real product as an outcome of an authentic task, and discuss with participants some of the difficulties and benefits associated with this challenge.

Recording -opens in Blackboard  Collaborate 

By Jan Herrington

Dr Jan Herrington is a Professor of Education at Murdoch University in Perth, Western Australia, where she teaches in the educational technology area in the School of Education, including a compulsory first year unit in the BEd called ‘Living and Learning with Technology’. She has been active in the promotion and support of the effective use of educational technologies in learning in schools and universities for over two decades. In this time, she has co-written or edited a range of books specifically for teachers in higher education on a variety of technology and teaching-related subjects, including Authentic learning environments in higher education (with Anthony Herrington), and most recently, A guide to authentic e-learning (with Thomas C Reeves and Ron Oliver) which was winner of the AECT Outstanding Book of the Year Award in 2010.

Jan’s current research focuses on authentic learning, the design of effective online learning environments for schools and higher education, and mobile learning. She has led two ARC grants investigating authentic tasks and the design-research approach. She has published over 150 refereed journal articles, conference papers and chapters. She was the Project Leader on the ALTC funded project: New technologies: New pedagogies (2006-2008), which investigated pedagogies appropriate to mobile learning. She is a former Fulbright Scholar who, in 2002, conducted research in authentic learning environments at the University of Georgia, USA. She has won many awards for her research including the Association for Educational Communication and Technology (AECT) Young Researcher of the Year Award, and several Outstanding Paper awards at international conferences, most recently at ascilite 2010, Global Learn 2011, and IADIS, 2012.

Contact details
Professor Jan Herrington
School of Education,
Murdoch University
South Street, Murdoch, 6150
Western Australia
Phone: +61 8 9360 6256
Email: j.herringon@murdoch.edu.au
janherrington@me.com

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Panel Discussion: Using Problem-Based, Real-World Activities in Online Classes

Join this panel discussion for an opportunity to hear from several faculty who have taught online using Problem-Based Learning where they use real-world activities to engage students in a collaborative learning process. Participants will have the opportunity to ask panel members specific questions on their experiences teaching this way.

Recording- Opens in Blackboard Collaborate

By Lani Uyeno

Lani Uyeno, Professor, Leeward Community College. Lani teaches writing and reading at Leeward CC.  She has both bachelors and masters degrees in English Education from the University of Hawaii at Manoa and has taught developmental and college-level reading and writing courses for 30+ years.  Her English 211 course, Autobiographical Writing, is a Problem-Based Learning course in which students are interns at an online company that provides support to memoir writers. She has presented at several national and international conferences on her use of Problem-Based Learning and teamwork in her classes.

By Peter Leong

Dr. Peter Leong is an Associate Professor with the Department of Educational Technology (ETEC) where he has worked since 2008. A native of Malaysia, he received his Ph.D. in Communication & Information Sciences from the University of Hawaii-Manoa. He also holds a M.Ed. in Educational Technology and a M.S. degree in Travel Industry Management. Dr. Leong has extensive experience in the development and delivery of online courses and distance education. He teaches both undergraduate and graduate courses which cover topics including quantitative research methods, instructional design, educational technology in informal learning environments as well as teaching and learning in virtual worlds. Dr. Leong was honored as one of Hawaii’s 2007 top high-technology leaders and was recently recognized with the University of Hawaii Board of Regents’ Medal for Teaching Excellence award in 2012. Dr. Leong publications include articles in Distance Education,Journal of Virtual Worlds Research, and the International Journal of Design Education. His research interests include student satisfaction with online learning, faculty support for technology integration, technologies for distance education and teaching & learning in virtual worlds.

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  1. Pingback: A FREE MOOC: How To Teach Online | Greg Walker

  2. Pingback: Week 0 – Introduction | Leanne Riseley

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